Saxophones How much is a Yamaha YAS280 worth

thomsax

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3,237
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Sweden
#42
So you’re basically saying that even made in China it could be a great instrument.
I don't think it matter so much "were and who" when it comes to saxophone manufactoring. The mexican saxophone workers were good. They were just doing was they wer told to do. It doesn't help if the owner or the mangement don't know anything about (saxophone) manufactoring.
 

nigeld

I think I need a different ligature
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#43
I think the "Made in Japan" issue is probably a red herring - a 280 is a 280 wherever it is assembled.
However the warranties offered by dealers in different countries vary, and sometimes they do not apply worldwide - so you need to be careful that you don't end up without a guarantee on your imported sax. or with a guarantee that would require you to send it back to Japan to remedy any faults.

But I'm a bit confused why you want to buy a Yamaha 280 when you own an SML.
I am the last person to want to dampen anyone else's GAS urges, but I think most people would say that the SML is a better instrument, and you should be able to get it set up in top condition for less than the cost of a Yamaha.

If you want to start playing right away while your SML is getting serviced then maybe you could hire a saxophone for a short period.
I don't know what the situation is in Canada, but in the UK, the large saxophone shops mostly have instruments for hire.
 

thomsax

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3,237
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Sweden
#44
I don’t know what you are talking about.
Is tone boosters some special thing that makes my saxophone sound better?

Then you state all I need is paper towels.
I’m a tad confused?
Sorry, resonators/reflectors/"tone boosters" is what we call resonators. Martin Company called them tone boosters. Use to be plastic or metal in middle of the saxophone pad. If you dry the saxophone pads after playing you don't need to clean them! I sometimes use a strong kitchen paper to dry the pads. To avoid mistakes use "pad paper". I use a pad stick the can be washed.

pictures of oversized brass resonator, how to use pad paper, and "pad-stick" .
PICT0657.JPG ytsmanual.jpg padstick.jpg
 
Messages
120
Location
Canada
#45
I think the "Made in Japan" issue is probably a red herring - a 280 is a 280 wherever it is assembled.
However the warranties offered by dealers in different countries vary, and sometimes they do not apply worldwide - so you need to be careful that you don't end up without a guarantee on your imported sax. or with a guarantee that would require you to send it back to Japan to remedy any faults.

But I'm a bit confused why you want to buy a Yamaha 280 when you own an SML.
I am the last person to want to dampen anyone else's GAS urges, but I think most people would say that the SML is a better instrument, and you should be able to get it set up in top condition for less than the cost of a Yamaha.

If you want to start playing right away while your SML is getting serviced then maybe you could hire a saxophone for a short period.
I don't know what the situation is in Canada, but in the UK, the large saxophone shops mostly have instruments for hire.
That’s a REALLY good question worthy of answering. The SML is an excellent horn. The sound is gorgeous. I hadn’t played in a while so was expecting to sound like a strangled goose but was delightfully surprised to hear a beautiful sound coming out of it. Last night I managed to fix the G# so now that works and the pads don’t look like they need replacing.

This is going to sound so exceptionally ‘lame’ but I’m a tad anal, possibly bordering on OCD about smells of things and no matter how much enjoyment I’m getting out of playing, that musty sax smell gets to me to the point of ruining the experience.

My sax has been airing out the last few days and already seems much better and I’m working on cleaning it. I’m going to actively look for a nice new case and get myself a saxophone stand. Do you know I’ve never owned a saxophone stand which is CRAZY!

Whats going on now is that I’m so excited about playing my saxophone again that I’m getting anxious and a tad on the manic side.
I should mellow out in a few days. I’ve actually considered renting a Yamaha 62 while I get my SML fixed up.

I’ve already upped the game. Hahaha.
Yeah I’m a bit on the crazy side. :rofl:
 
Messages
120
Location
Canada
#46
Sorry, resonators/reflectors/"tone boosters" is what we call resonators. Martin Company called them tone boosters. Use to be plastic or metal in middle of the saxophone pad. If you dry the saxophone pads after playing you don't need to clean them! I sometimes use a strong kitchen paper to dry the pads. To avoid mistakes use "pad paper". I use a pad stick the can be washed.

pictures of oversized brass resonator, how to use pad paper, and "pad-stick" .
View attachment 11883 View attachment 11884 View attachment 11885
Really? I’m learning so much so quickly here. The Internet truly is a wonderful thing sometimes. Thank you so much.
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
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3,237
Location
Sweden
#47
But I'm a bit confused why you want to buy a Yamaha 280 when you own an SML.
A SML in good playing condition use to be a better player compared to a Yamaha 280. For some weeks ago I played with a guy that had bought a SML Rev D tenor for 17000.00 s e k. My G4M is a better player. I had to play the lower tenor part of te song "In the Midnight Hour" because his sax couldn't play down there. I bouhgt the G4M tenor for 2000.00 s e k!! They use to call SML's for mkVI killers! I would say a G4M is a Rev D killer!
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
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590
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Oneonta, NY
#48
The article you have linked to refers to Yamaha student line of instruments and not all Yamaha wind instruments.

As far as I am aware Yamaha's pro line of instruments whether they are drums, wind instruments, and acoustic guitars are all made in their Hamamatsu factory complex near Tokyo. A lot of their other products are made around the world in places like China, Indonesia and Malaysia. I also read years ago Yamaha had assembly facilities in Germany for the European market and in the US at Grand Rapids, Michigan obviously for the North American market.When purchasing any product especially on-line research and due diligence is paramount.

I personally own 3 Yamaha saxophones made in Japan and all they all play very well, a Yamaha acoustic guitar made in China that is a great instrument, and a Yamaha electronic keyboard made in Malaysia that is fantastic. I also own some Yamaha hi-fi gear made in Malaysia that is excellent. I have also owned Yamaha motorcycles as well...


Greg S.

I have 2 Yamaha altos and a soprano.
I really love the brand.
 
Messages
120
Location
Canada
#49
A SML in good playing condition use to be a better player compared to a Yamaha 280. For some weeks ago I played with a guy that had bought a SML Rev D tenor for 17000.00 s e k. My G4M is a better player. I had to play the lower tenor part of te song "In the Midnight Hour" because his sax couldn't play down there. I bouhgt the G4M tenor for 2000.00 s e k!! They use to call SML's for mkVI killers! I would say a G4M is a Rev D killer!
My SML can play all the low notes very nice as well as every high note. It can play every note right now except for middle & high C# but I’m working on it. It’s a very nice saxophone with a very nice tone so worst case scenerio is that I get two great playing saxophones. :happydance:
 
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Halfers

Finger Flapper
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810
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Hampshire
#50
My SML can play all the low notes very nice as well as every high note. It can play every note right now except for middle & high C# but I’m working on it. It’s a very nice saxophone with a very nice tone so worst case scenerio is that I get two great playing saxophones. :happydance:
What's the problem with middle and high C#? As that's no fingers, or no fingers with the Octave Key, how is there a problem with producing the note?
 
Messages
120
Location
Canada
#51
I have 2 Yamaha altos and a soprano.
I really love the brand.
Which ones do you have ?
I’ve pondered the idea of getting a soprano but that’s in a different key altogether.
I like how Kenny G plays it.
Did you start with Alto and then learn soprano and how difficult was it to learn?

I read that many people have a hard time with pitch at that high end.

I’m also starting to discover that there are many top professional saxophone players that LOVE Yamaha saxophones and swear by them. Many use the mid range model 62.
Very interesting stuff. I’m not sure what model I will get but it’s definitejy going to be a Yamaha.
 
Messages
120
Location
Canada
#52
What's the problem with middle and high C#? As that's no fingers, or no fingers with the Octave Key, how is there a problem with producing the note?
Well I don’t know! All I know is when I go from a natural C to a C# not much changes. It’s certainly not a semi tone transition.
 

Halfers

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#53
Well I don’t know! All I know is when I go from a natural C to a C# not much changes. It’s certainly not a semi tone transition.
I only have a tiny mind, so I'm sure someone with more knowledge can unravel that which is a mystery to me!

I had the opportunity to play a 62 and a couple of equivalently priced horns on a trip to Sax.Co.UK earlier in the Year I have to say the 62 underwhelmed me, to say the least. I am more than happy to be wowed by the possibility of an upgrade, but, to me, the 62 neither felt, nor sounded significantly different or more 'Professional' than my 280. To be fair, neither did the equivalently priced Yani strike me as something that would create an itch that could only be cured with a spending scratch.

Granted, the above no doubt says a lot more about me and my pathetic ear, than indicate a lack of class in the horn. But my Credit Card Demon didn't feel inclined to start whispering into my right ear.

EDIT: I have to add that I'm talking about Tenors here (and of course my humble experience of them), rather than Alto, so may well be very different with the Eb variant. And of course I'll add the Forum favourite regarding variable mileage etc..
 
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thomsax

Well-Known Member
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3,237
Location
Sweden
#54
My SML can play all the low notes very nice as well as every high note. It can play every note right now except for middle & high C# but I’m working on it. It’s a very nice saxophone with a very nice tone so worst case scenerio is that I get two great playing saxophones. :happydance:
Yes, SML saxes are good. But a little bit overrated, IMO. Been lost of good writing on internet about SML the last years and that pumped up the prices. In the late 70's they were not mentioned to be among the best saxes. Selmer , Buffe and Yamaha were the big 3 back then. But SML's are very good saxes.
 
Messages
120
Location
Canada
#55
Yes, SML saxes are good. But a little bit overrated, IMO. Been lost of good writing on internet about SML the last years and that pumped up the prices. In the late 70's they were not mentioned to be among the best saxes. Selmer , Buffe and Yamaha were the big 3 back then. But SML's are very good saxes.
That’s where I’m on the naive side. Until a few days ago I had never heard of my saxophone brand nor did I ever look it up.
To be blatantly honest, I’ve only tried one other type of saxophone in my life and that was a top of the line Selmer in the early ‘90’s that I rented for a month and I actually preferred mine. It may well have simply been that I was so used to mine that it was more familiar so more comfortable to me.

I’m never tried a Yamaha but I like the sound of them and I like their reputation.
One of the things that appealed to me about the YAS 280 is the weight of it. It’s about half the weight of most other saxophones yet still holds a beautiful sound. While practising for hours the sax can get a bit on the heavy side. It might be because I’ve broken both sides of my collar bone but I did find that if I played a long time ( like at professional events ) it would aggravate my collarbone some.

With a nice light clean saxophone I think I’d be apt to play more. My consideration of the 62 is just my greediness taking over. My rationalization being that if I can afford a brand new 280 then perhaps I could spring for a used 62 . It’s pushing the envelope a little too much. Plus the 62 is 12.5 pounds which is a bit on the heavy side for my preference. Weight probably isn’t an issue for most of you but it is for me.

I’ve seen some cool really cool sax straps though so I’m interested in trying something new.

I think I’m so overwhelmed right now because I’ve never considered going online to look up stuff about saxophones and now I’m getting flooded with all new information. It’s a bit of info overload but it’s so exciting.
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,237
Location
Sweden
#56
As I wrote before SML saxes are pretty common here in Sweden. For me and my freinds (born in the 50's) it was posssible to buy a used Rev D or Gold Medal in the 70's for less money. I know four guys who owns SML tenors. But they are not playig thier saxes. To bring back an old SML sax in good playing condition is quite expensive. So they are on more modern saxes; Selmer,, Keilwerth, Yamaha ... . My former sax tech here in Sweden was trained and worked also for SML, Paris for some years in the late 60's and early 70's. I was close to buy is alto but I didn't do it. I don't play alto. But I have some new SML reeds. It's better to own SML reeds instead of a SML alto. Less money and they don't need any service!!
smlreed.JPG
 

Ivan

Undecided
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#58
I had the opportunity to play a 62 and a couple of equivalently priced horns on a trip to Sax.Co.UK earlier in the Year I have to say the 62 underwhelmed me, to say the least...
It's about personal taste. But I wouldn't assume that the next sax you fall in love with has to be a Yamaha @SaxyNikki

In fact if the SML stirs your soul, I wouldn't be surprised if you found a Yamaha a tad underwhelming. If you can, play as many examples of sax before you buy... easier said than done, I know, if you live in the boondocks
 
Messages
120
Location
Canada
#59
As I wrote before SML saxes are pretty common here in Sweden. For me and my freinds (born in the 50's) it was posssible to buy a used Rev D or Gold Medal in the 70's for less money. I know four guys who owns SML tenors. But they are not playig thier saxes. To bring back an old SML sax in good playing condition is quite expensive. So they are on more modern saxes; Selmer,, Keilwerth, Yamaha ... . My former sax tech here in Sweden was trained and worked also for SML, Paris for some years in the late 60's and early 70's. I was close to buy is alto but I didn't do it. I don't play alto. But I have some new SML reeds. It's better to own SML reeds instead of a SML alto. Less money and they don't need any service!!
View attachment 11892
I understand everyone has a right to an opinion but yours seems really bias and actually a bit on the rude side.

Quote: “It’s better to own SML reeds than an SML saxophone?”
Could you be any more insulting?

Saxophones, like anything else in life are a personally preference. Some people don’t even like the instrument at all. There are some that think it’s a devil worshipping instrument and anyone playing it is loose with no morals but most of us know better.

It’s 2018, so by now we should ALL understand that all of this is personal preference. Life is about personal preference.

I completely understand the ‘old sax lovers.’
Old saxophones have that sexy, raspy, airy quality that new modern saxophones don’t have. A quality worthy of appreciation. Many people who own these saxophones grew up in the era in which they were made so carry this appreciation and while I was born a few years later, I STIL value these instruments highly as do others.

While my SML is old and musty, it’s been a highly valued part of my life that I’ve had since 1973. That’s FORTY FIVE years! To tell me I’d be better off just having their reeds is insulting.

I happen to have VERY diverse musical tastes. I love the old Glen Miller , Tommy doresy era but I also love all the stuff inbetween including the sax players from Pink Floyd, Bob Seger, Supertramp, etc.
I love modern bluesy jazz , rock, pop ....
the list is endless.

It’s possible to appreciate the old saxophones as well as the new modern ones. Someone stated that Yamahas are too clean sounding and I can appreciate and understand that statement. It’s not meant as a criticism but stated as a musical preference and there’s a big difference.

I think I’d like to have polar opposites in my saxophone musical tastes. Keep the old musty,raspy, sexy old saxophone for the stuff that sounds best with that type of tone but upgrade to a more modern make like Yamaha for the bright clarity for my other musical tastes .

In my opinion, there is no right or wrong. There’s what’s right for me.

Perhaps save your reed comment for those who purchase the $49 super sax specials on eBay or just keep them to yourself.
 

Halfers

Finger Flapper
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810
Location
Hampshire
#60
It's about personal taste. But I wouldn't assume that the next sax you fall in love with has to be a Yamaha @SaxyNikki

In fact if the SML stirs your soul, I wouldn't be surprised if you found a Yamaha a tad underwhelming. If you can, play as many examples of sax before you buy... easier said than done, I know, if you live in the boondocks
Just to expand on my comment on the 62. I think it was more that I was possibly expecting a lot more from a Sax that cost twice as much as my 280. Not so much that I didn't like the sound of the 62 but that it was really quite similar to the 280 (sound and feel). I have to say I felt the same about the other horns from Yanigisawa and P Mauriat that I played in the same £2.5 - 3K mark in that I was underwhelmed that I didn't get that sense of 'speciallness' from such an expensive instrument.
 
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