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Brass Trumpets......

HPS

New Member
Messages
28
Sean - If it helps I have played brass instruments regularly since 1990. Mainly traditional brass bands but some other ensembles too. I play cornet, flugel, soprano cornet and piccolo trumpet.

If you need any specific info let me know and I should be able to help you.

Regards
 

Greg Strange

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,053
I love the Trumpet. I remember the day in Junior School (must have been 8 or 9) when we were asked which instrument we wanted to learn. In my head I had Saxophone, Saxophone, Saxophone, but when it came to me I found myself saying "Trumpet"!?

I played for a few Years then it was put aside! Still remember my Trumpet Teachers name. Mister Lister..he had fag yellow hair and fag yellow fingers. He died of Cancer quite soon after I started lessons with him..

To those that double Sax and Trumpet, Any pros and cons that cross over to the other instrument?
I don't know whether it's a pro or con - for me trying to remember the different fingering systems and also the different embouchures for trumpet, clarinet, saxophone and flute...:w00t:

Danny Pelfry refers to the trumpet as "The Coil of Torture" as quoted in an interview in Saxophone Journal" magazine...


Greg S.
 
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SeanLR

Member
Messages
33
Sean - If it helps I have played brass instruments regularly since 1990. Mainly traditional brass bands but some other ensembles too. I play cornet, flugel, soprano cornet and piccolo trumpet.

If you need any specific info let me know and I should be able to help you.

Regards
Thanks, I think I've narrowed it down between a John Packer JP251SW, a Yamaha 1335 or the pTrumpet, but I could purchase either of the first 2 in used condition for a little more than a new pTrumpet. If it turns out I can't get on, I could probably sell either of the first two without any financial hit.
 

Hammie 1982

Member
Messages
122
The ptrumpet is fairly impressive.... i know a couple of lads that play them! They mostly use them where they wouldnt want to take the expensive ones!!!! they have told me "like any instrument, the standard mouth piece is rubbish! but using my own mouth piece it is very nearly as good and easy to play as the professional ones"

coming from one of these lads inparticular, thats a BIG thumbs up and endorsement
 

Nikki

Formerly SaxyNikki
Subscriber
Messages
792
The ptrumpet is fairlyThe professional player seemed genuinely impressed. It’s the kind of instrument you take to a party. It’s waterproof and you’ll never lose it.
 

HPS

New Member
Messages
28
Sean - Personally I would recommend a Yamaha. The 1335 is the entry level and a decent trumpet. If you can increase your budget a little the next model up - Yamaha 2 series trumpets are good and play similar to the 'pro' level models. They are marketed as student instruments but play well and hold their value should you decide to sell. I have a few spare trumpet mouthpieces, if you need one in the future let me know and I will post you one for free.
 
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SeanLR

Member
Messages
33
Sean - Personally I would recommend a Yamaha. The 1335 is the entry level and a decent trumpet. If you can increase your budget a little the next model up - Yamaha 2 series trumpets are good and play similar to the 'pro' level models. They are marketed as student instruments but play well and hold their value should you decide to sell. I have a few spare trumpet mouthpieces, if you need one in the future let me know and I will post you one for free.
Hi, as I've never even touched, held or seen a trumpet up close, I played safe and purchased the 1335 along with a SSHHMute ( Thanks @Greg Strange ) and a starter book all for under £200 so fingers crossed all will arrive safely within the week. 'IF' it all goes horrbly wrong, then I should be able to move everything along and not be too much out of pocket. I'm still interested in the John Packer JP251SW and if I take to this, I will probably grab one of those too.

Many thanks for your advice and your kind offer @HPS , and thanks everyone for your input.
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
Subscriber
Messages
1,599
That's very cool. Best of luck. It should be a lot of fun.
 

HPS

New Member
Messages
28
Sean - That's great, glad you managed to get a trumpet and a mute.

If you need any help getting started let me know and we can do a skype or zoom call and I can help (if you need it of course!)

Good luck
 
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SeanLR

Member
Messages
33
One mute? There's lots. Excercise your gas. There's nothing quite like a muted trumpet. Makes me feel kind of blue. :)
Totally agree. Beautiful sound, but this one is purely to keep the neighbours happy ;) If and when I get to the level of a muted trumpet sound to 'make you weep', I shall post some tunes :)
 

EdJ

Member
Messages
102
My grandad was a professional trumpet and cornet player (among other things) I inherited his Besson Prototype before circuitously being promoted via clarinet to play my preferred bassoon. No expert having not played for decades but the cornet is a bit more compact as well as the sound differences because of the tube wrap. The pTrumpet mouthpieces are usable plastic ones not sure about cornet ones but they are plastic too. Cornet and trumpet mouthpieces are different (shorter length different cup) but the technique is interchangeable like flugel horn or valve trombone. Yamaha silent brass works well as a practice mute much better than sax mutes as trumpets, corners etc do not have holes leaking sound all the way down their length.
 

HPS

New Member
Messages
28
Cornet and trumpet mouthpieces are different (shorter length different cup) but the technique is interchangeable like flugel horn or valve trombone
Cornet and trumpet mouthpiece cups can actually be the same dependent on different scenarios. For example when I play Bb cornet in a brass band I use a deep 'V' style mouthpiece which helps with a darker, richer tone. When playing soprano cornet (Eb) I use a shallow mouthpiece with a 'bowl' shape cup which helps with producing a brighter tone and makes playing in the higher register easier. Trumpet mouthpieces come in varieties of shallow, medium or deep cups, the same as cornet mouthpieces.

Whilst the basic technique is similar for playing all brass instruments, the approach is often quite different between instruments. Flugelhorn requires different breath control and dynamic restraint compared to cornet or trumpet to achieve the desired tone.

Playing with mutes is ok if necessary due to circumstances. Playing without a mute develops better tone and diaphragm control, especially in the early stages of learning. Mutes are generally used to make certain effects but can have a negative impact on tuning and intonation.
 
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