SYOS

The CaféSaxophone saxophone

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Pete Thomas

Pete Thomas

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Trying to imagine the effect on the horn’s action of the mass reduction - I guess (hope) the action will be surprisingly light and swift.
Yes, this is what we are thinking of as the main advantage. Beautiful action and also a much lighter instrument.
 
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Pete Thomas

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Café Supporter
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12,714
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McLean, Virginia
How could such material be swedged if the sax were to need it?
Swedging is not possible, nor will it be needed.

Bear in mind there is more to this than a point screw sticking into a bit of Portsmouth carbon fibre. As I said above there are other materials involved but for reasons I hope people understand I'm not saying too much. Partly it's a secret, partly I am not qualified to explain technically and partly, we are still in the teaser stage :)
 

Wonko

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Belgium
If you are looking for people with experience in combining carbon-fibre with other materials. You could look at manufacturing of road racing bikes. Their frames are mostly carbon-fibre, and just about every other part is in aluminium or other alloys.
 

Stephen Howard

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UK
I think all will be revealed when you see the actual thing, and i think you will be one of the first to have a proper butchers.
My biggest concern with 'pegged' key arms is that the stresses involved are focussed around a very small area, and this can lead to the hole for the pin becoming enlarged.
I see it on flutes from time-to-time - which traditionally use small pins to secure parts of the keywork to a single rod. The forces involved are quite low on a flute - but the fact that it still occurs leads me to wonder what will happen when you scale it up.

But...there is a precedent on a sax - the Boosey & Co soprano had pins fitted to the low B/B key. There wasn't much (if any) wear present on the example I serviced, but the stresses involved wouldn't have been that great. However, once you start dealing with keys that are more strongly sprung it may well become an issue over a relatively short space of time.
This is why I'd favour a hex-shaped key barrel, so that the profile of the barrel takes most of the strain and leaves the pin to serve merely as a locking device.
 
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