What are you listening to (plus reviews)

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
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4,374
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brighton by the sea
#1
An idea for an on-going thread (or maybe even it's own section..?) If anyone else is up for it, how about a rolling "what i'm currently digging" & CD review? any genre. We're all interested in music here, lets hope we can cross inspire each other.... What do you reckon?
I'll post when I've had an hour to knock something together...
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
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5,232
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
#2
Well Done, that man!

Obviously I am very into Reggae and Ska at the mo, and have been listening (as I did in the very early 70's) to "Catch a Fire" by the Wailers, and "Marcus Garvey' by Burning Spear - both defining albums. I have also been listening to "Somewhere in the Between" by Streetlight Manifesto, "Live in Paris" by the New York Ska-Jazz Ensemble, The Specials "Singles" and the complete collection of CDs by Sigur Ros, an Icelandic group.

Quite enjoying a break from all types of jazz, and back to my roots, so to speak.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

dooce

Well-Known Member
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1,360
Location
Daventry
#4
I have surprised myself by getting very into Radioheads "In Rainbows". I only bought it 'cos it was 5 quid in HMV and I was vaguely aware that one of the tracks was in 5/4 time. It's not been off the cars CD player in 2 weeks now. Lyrics are a bit miserable/navel-gazing but the music is fascinating, multi-layered and complex. It's very encouraging that music this well-made and thought out is so popular.

The other stuff that is making a change from my usual listening is gangster bop/swing revival, particularly Royal Crown Revue, an American band - haven't bought any of it yet but spend hours with it burbling away on Last FM. Some spectacular tenor sax playing on it. I guess Jools is familiar with their stuff from his Fat 45 involvement?
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,374
Location
brighton by the sea
#5
The other stuff that is making a change from my usual listening is gangster bop/swing revival, particularly Royal Crown Revue, an American band - haven't bought any of it yet but spend hours with it burbling away on Last FM. Some spectacular tenor sax playing on it. I guess Jools is familiar with their stuff from his Fat 45 involvement?
Not 'alf! Get yourself a copy of their "Mugzy's Move" CD, it's a corker! If you like this kind of stuff- check out Big Bad Voodoo Daddy as well, especially their first 2 CDS &, if you can find it, the one CD by The Atomic Fireballs (the most lively of any of those bands- thrash jive, fronted by a hybrid of Tom Waits and Screaming Jay Hawkins)
 
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dooce

Well-Known Member
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1,360
Location
Daventry
#6
Not 'alf! Get yourself a copy of their "Mugzy's Move" CD, it's a corker! If you like this kind of stuff- check out Big Bad Voodoo Daddy as well, especially their first 2 CDS &, if you can find it, the one CD by The Atomic Fireballs (the most lively of any of those bands- thrash jive, fronted by a hybrid of Tom Waits and Screaming Jay Hawkins)

Thanks for the shopping list! I'm hoping to persuade our band to do some of this stuff (but I promise we won't tread on Fat45's turf :))))
 
Messages
1,361
Location
Buckinghamshire
#8
An idea for an on-going thread (or maybe even it's own section..?) If anyone else is up for it, how about a rolling "what i'm currently digging" & CD review? any genre. We're all interested in music here, lets hope we can cross inspire each other.... What do you reckon?
I'll post when I've had an hour to knock something together...
Jules

Great idea mate - only issue will be finding the reviews amongst all the additional comments as the thread grows. How about a separate section for Music Reviews Pete?
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,374
Location
brighton by the sea
#10
As the weather gets nicer I always feel drawn to upbeat, put a smile on your face, toe tapping world music. Two absolute corkers on my car stereo at the moment- Los De Abajo, a lively, slightly punky Mexican street band - their "Vs the lunatics" album is great, especially a cover of 'The Lunatics have taken over the Ayslum' which features Dennis Rollins on trombone and Neville Staples toasting. Also a single track by German band/Dj(?), Shantel- 'Disco Partizani' is a slightly techno-ed up take on East European brass band music (ok, that doesn't sound great on paper, but-trust me- this one's a real toe tapper). both are well worth a download for good, perky summer music.
Elsewhere its Jan Garbarek's Twelve Moons (goergeously atmospheric stuff- but is it jazz?) & my bible- The "Big Horn" 1950s R&B boxed set (another corker- loads and loads of tracks by the likes of Earl Bostic, Big Jay MCNeely etc).
 
Messages
346
Location
Exeter
#11
recommended

I have been sent 2 great new jazz releases to play on my radio show in the last week or two 1. Gilad Atzmon - In Loving Memory of America - his quartet plus the Sigamos String Quartet - superb nostalgic tribute to Bird, American jazz with moody, even sinister undertones and exemplary alto, soprano and clarinet playing by the man. 2. Dave O' Higgins Quintet featuring Eric Alexander - Sketchbook - good old fashioned 2 tenor burn up with one of my favourite contemporary American tenor players - Dave is very brave to record with him - the difference in sound is fairly obvious so it's fun comparing the two players who are both great. A couple of good compositions by Dave O Higgins. Recommend both albums if you like jazz.:welldone
 
Messages
201
Location
Buckinghamshire, UK
#12
Adam's Apple - Wayne Shorter.

  • Great idea Jules! I bought this as a download from Amazon.
    1966
    Personnel:
    Wayne Shorter - Sax
    Herbie Hancock - Piano
    Reggie Workman - Bass
    Joe Chambers - Drums

    Track List:
  • Adam's Apple
  • 502 Blues (Drinkin' and Drivin')
  • El Gaucho
  • Footprints
  • Teru
  • Chief Crazy Horse
  • The Collector
    This is Shorter's 3rd album, I believe. It's a collection of AABA form bluesy tunes. Shorter's buzz-saw sound is beautifully recorded here as he weaves in and out of the fantastic rhythm section like an incensed hornet. Things are a little more laid-back on 502 blues and Teru is a floaty kind of track, but there's still a real edge to his playing. Shorter 's style is to build quite short bursts into longer phrases. He can be very inventive harmonically, but this album is fairly restrained in that department. My favourite track is Footprints. I first heard this played live by Peter King and it sent shivers down my spine, so I tracked down the Miles Davis and Shorter versions which all have their own identity. I like them all. The other personnel are first-class here as you'd expect with Herbie Hancock playing some great stuff, but really it's all about Shorter.

 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
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5,232
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
#13
An excellent album indeed - played El Gaucho for my Grade 4 jazz cornet exam. I do prefer Shorter to Coltrane on the whole - he seems more aware/in control of what he is doing, which is enjoyable.

The horn section on the New York Ska-Jazz ensemble is also well worth a listen - on their myspace site, for example.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,232
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
#15
Buenos Nachos Jules!

Ish. I certainly know the Jazz Warriors - have their first LP, but I will duly investigate them. I seem to remember noticing them in a recent JazzWise magazine.

Have a lovely dayBTW:w00t:
Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,232
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
#16
Also, on the theme of 60's jazz I've been enjoying "Sidewinder" by Lee Morgan over the past few weeks. Great trumpet player, and the album features many decent numbers, including the legendary title track.

Have a nice day!:w00t:
Kind regard
Tom:cool:
 
Messages
125
Location
Rochester, Kent
#17
Follow The Red Line - Chris Potter

I've been listening to Follow The Red Line by Chris Potter. This catches his 'underground' band in a live setting. This album is truly about improvising with other band members that manage to transport the ideas of the soloist to whever they want to go. It reminds me of Mahavishnu in places for shear energy, spontaneity and virtuosity.

Potter's tone has a visceral edge to it, thats not to say that he isn't in control - quite the opposite, he is able to generate a raw sound with a solid core and uses it to improvise without cliche, licks or patterns - with such a strong technique he can let his mind run free.

This is a modern album that could typify the current direction of jazz (irregular meters, eclectic rhythms, irregular instrumental formats).

Potter ends a frenetic set with some beautiful compositions (could almost be orchestrated) lead by his bass clarinet - nothing flashy; just tasteful musical colours of emotion.

You don't neccessarily have to play loud or fast to get the message across - There are many dimensions to Chris Potter.
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,374
Location
brighton by the sea
#18
Also, on the theme of 60's jazz I've been enjoying "Sidewinder" by Lee Morgan over the past few weeks. Great trumpet player, and the album features many decent numbers, including the legendary title track.

Have a nice day!:w00t:
Kind regard
Tom:cool:
Oo that's a good one ot follow up- I obviously know the Sidewinder but i've not explored his output further (there's one fro the list)...
 
Messages
201
Location
Buckinghamshire, UK
#19
An excellent album indeed - played El Gaucho for my Grade 4 jazz cornet exam. I do prefer Shorter to Coltrane on the whole - he seems more aware/in control of what he is doing, which is enjoyable.
Yes I like more of Shorter, in fact I like everything I've heard. Coltrane I like some of, particularly "My Favourite Things" album. Thelonius Monk is superb here also.

The horn section on the New York Ska-Jazz ensemble is also well worth a listen - on their myspace site, for example.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:
That's something to follow up on later. Thanks.
 
Messages
201
Location
Buckinghamshire, UK
#20
I've been listening to Follow The Red Line by Chris Potter. This catches his 'underground' band in a live setting. This album is truly about improvising with other band members that manage to transport the ideas of the soloist to whever they want to go. It reminds me of Mahavishnu in places for shear energy, spontaneity and virtuosity.

Potter's tone has a visceral edge to it, thats not to say that he isn't in control - quite the opposite, he is able to generate a raw sound with a solid core and uses it to improvise without cliche, licks or patterns - with such a strong technique he can let his mind run free.

This is a modern album that could typify the current direction of jazz (irregular meters, eclectic rhythms, irregular instrumental formats).

Potter ends a frenetic set with some beautiful compositions (could almost be orchestrated) lead by his bass clarinet - nothing flashy; just tasteful musical colours of emotion.

You don't neccessarily have to play loud or fast to get the message across - There are many dimensions to Chris Potter.
It's now on my wish list!
 
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