Taming The Saxophone

New Year's Resolution - Grade 5 Theory

Jeanette

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no! sorry (i have no excuses...)
Don't apologies, I didn't spot it the first time only when I went to respond to Jazzaferri to check what I was saying about the diminished octave did I realise :)

It is slowly sinking in. I might be testing young @chadders tomorrow to check my homework :)

Thanks Mandy you have really helped, hope your students appreciate you.

Jx
 

MandyH

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I did the online course "Fundamentals of Music Theory" (twice) and lots of people got themselves knotted up by counting semi-tones and by using enharmonics.
If you think of the notes by the correct names (even if Fx is fingered exactly the same as G) you are more likely to get your intervals correct.
Start as you mean to go on. ;)

(I feel like some music theory warrior now :( )
 

tenorviol

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Always start on the lower note as ‘1’ and count. So for example an F something to a G something is always some form of 2nd (9th if it’s over the octane). It could be augmented, major, minor, or diminished. And going the other way a G to an F is some form of 7th...
 

Jeanette

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So my theory book has me learning about other instruments eg strings, woodwind and I quote "A brass instrument is played by blowing through a reed, or buzzing into a mouthpiece"

What brass instrument uses a reed?

Jx
 

Young Col

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Not the generally accepted use of the term "brass instrument" although factually correct when you consider most saxes are made of brass. I wonder which book you are using, J? Taking, again, Eric Taylor's AB Theory Guide (book 2 this time), he follows the more general line of describing trumpets, cornets, horns, trombones... as brass. He describes saxes, along with clarinets, as a single reed sub-category of woodwind (carefully avoiding whatever material they are made of!).
If one describes saxophones as brass instruments then perhaps cymbals should be similarly included.
 

Jeanette

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Not the generally accepted use of the term "brass instrument" although factually correct when you consider most saxes are made of brass. I wonder which book you are using, J? Taking, again, Eric Taylor's AB Theory Guide (book 2 this time), he follows the more general line of describing trumpets, cornets, horns, trombones... as brass. He describes saxes, along with clarinets, as a single reed sub-category of woodwind (carefully avoiding whatever material they are made of!).
If one describes saxophones as brass instruments then perhaps cymbals should be similarly included.
Book was recommended by a tutor "Music Theory for Young Musicians" by Ying Ying NG a little less dry than Eric Taylor's which I also have. Whilst the quoted comment is in the book he doesn't mention saxes in either brass or woodwind category but it is misleading. I was just wondering if there was another instrument using a reed that had passed me by that fell properly in the brass section...but I suspect not :)

Thanks Col

Jx
 
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Well a horn (French, German or Viennese) is often considered to be a woodwind. It plays in a woodwind quintet but not in a brass band. I can't think of an instance the other way round.
 
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French horns are brass but do play in woodwind ensembles... consistency is the last refuge of the competent....
...and not in brass ensembles.

It's a bit like a tomato. It's a fruit from a biological perspective but a vegetable from a culinary perspective.

The horn is quieter than the other brass so it blends better with the woodwinds. Functionally woodwind, physically brass.
 

Jeanette

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Nearly at the end of my second grade 4 workbook :but need some clarification :)

Question re chromatic scales starting on dominant of c# minor So a g# I have to enter notes on treble clef staff with key signature of Email

So I entered notes as follows, I haven't shown # unless I have had to add it as an accidental.

N= natural sign added
X= double sharp

G A #A B NC #C ND #D E NF #F NG new bar just has G

Ans was same until I got to fifth note they use #B C XC D E then we are the same.

Would I lose marks for my answer?

Jx
 
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