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New Year's Resolution - Grade 5 Theory

Jeanette

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#1
Actually this was this year's new years resolution but for a variety of reasons which I won't bore you with it hasn't happened. However I have started serious structured study and intend sitting it some time in 2017.

You can feel free to nag me and make sure I don't give up :)

Meanwhile I will use this thread to ask questions of all our clever members.

First question:

I have a piece of music n 2/4 with various semi quavers and quavers that I have to rewrite inserting the appropriate beams. I'm struggling with one bar. It has 3 semi quavers, quaver, 3 semi quavers. I'm thinking beam the first and last two semi quavers but leave the other notes without a beam.

Any help appreciated:)

Jx
 
Last edited:

nigeld

festina andante
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#3
I have a piece of music n 2/4 with various semi quavers and quavers that I have to rewrite inserting the appropriate beams. I'm struggling with one bar. It has 3 semi quavers, quaver, 3 semi quavers. I'm thinking beam the first and last two semi quavers but leave the other notes without a beam.
Are you allowed to rewrite the middle quaver as two tied semiquavers?

(Translation for non-Brits: quaver = 1/8th note, semiquaver = 1/16th note)
 

Jeanette

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#4
So which month are you going to take the exam in?
And which Exam Board?
I haven't decided when but ABRSM I think unless anyone has a good reason to suggest another?
Are you allowed to rewrite the middle quaver as two tied semiquavers?
If that makes sense yes but the books do say to avoid ties where possible.

I think that does make sense though, I can beam two sets of semi q which nicely separates the beat :)

Jx
 

nigeld

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#6
If I was playing, I think I would prefer to see them grouped in pairs in this case, so it's obvious where the fourth beat goes. But it's more important to do what the examiners want.
 

Jeanette

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#7
If I was playing, I think I would prefer to see them grouped in pairs in this case, so it's obvious where the fourth beat goes. But it's more important to do what the examiners want.
But it is in two four, isn't that two crotchet beats to a bar? :)

Jx
 

Jeanette

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#10
Question number 2 :)

I have to identify the key of a piece?

Key sig is showing a Bb so first thought F maj but I note all the Cs are sharp so presumably the key is D minor?

Jx
 

nigeld

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#11
But it is in two four, isn't that two crotchet beats to a bar? :)
Yes, but he's thinking quavers. And although it's not really a beat, it makes sense.
Yes, I was imagining quaver beats. Sorry. :oops:

In practical terms, how many beats there are in the bar might depend how fast the piece is supposed to be played, rather than on the time signature. My idea was to give the player as much visual help as possible. But in exam terms there are two beats in this bar.
 

nigeld

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#12
Question number 2 :)

I have to identify the key if a piece?

Key sig is showing a Bb so first thought F maj but I note all the Cs are sharp so presumably the key is D minor?

Jx
Sounds like it.

You can also check which notes it starts and ends on. For example, if it ends with a D, then that is also an indicator that it is in D minor.
 

nigeld

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#16
If there is one flat, then it is presumably F major or D minor. The examiners will have to give you a clue which it is. So you can start by looking for an obvious clue. C# is a pretty big clue. It would be sneaky to include C# if the piece is in F. Starting or ending on, for example, So Do, would be a smaller clue. So if the piece starts or ends with A-D it is more likely to be in D minor, whereas C-F would suggest F major. If the harmony is indicated, then the final chord will hopefully be a tonic chord. But in this case the final note, A, is the third of F or the fifth of D, which doesn't really help.
 

Jazzaferri

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#17
Not sure about your grading system but in arranging here it is important to show beat 2 in 2/4 or beat 3 in 4/4 which would mean writing the middle as tied semi-quavers rather than quaver bridging the beat at which point the beaming becomes obvious
 

kevgermany

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#18
But given you shouldn't tie the third beat wouldn't that be wrong?

Jx
I don't really know. But you have a rhythm which doesn't fit the standard rules. So how best to show it. Writing it as 8 semi quavers with the middle two tied and putting beams across each crotchet group is really clear. Alternately beam 2, single, tie 2, single, beam would work. But it puts the bar into 4/8.
 

kevgermany

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#19
Sounds like it.

You can also check which notes it starts and ends on. For example, if it ends with a D, then that is also an indicator that it is in D minor.
It ends on an A but I didn't know that fact so thank you :)

Jx
Classical rules. Generally applies to most music. Last note is the more important. Beware of pieces that modulate. But if you only have a couple of bars, the Accidentals and the key sig are your clues. Also the presence of the tonic and fifth. But which minor is it? And are they expecting it as the answer, or just minor?