SYOS

Breaking a bad habit

Guenne

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I had a brief go it was difficult, I could do A and G before to long, do you think it is worthwhile?
If you can do some notes, no.
I'd rather go for some (major, minor, whatever) scales from low register to middle and high register without octave key, playing the triad also without OK. (All slurred).
I'd play major and minor scales, arpeggios on the MPC alone,
Like: Starting on a comfortable note, determining the pitch, the gradually adding the notes of a scale. Let's say the note is G (Bb Concert, which is rather high), and you practice a major scale.
Then you play: G-F#-G G-F#-E-F#-G G-F#-E-D-E-F#-G and so on until you play the full scale.

There is a passage in "Developing a personal saxophone sound", where Dave Liebman demonstrates that the changes in singing a pitch are much easier and more exact on an "ee" vowel* than on "ah". *(With a relaxed jaw).

Cheers, Guenne
 
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'd rather go for some (major, minor, whatever) scales from low register to middle and high register without octave key, playing the triad also without OK. (All slurred).
this is something i have done in the past, i am comfortable up to A and then it starts to get harder, sometimes i can do the C#
 
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I'd play major and minor scales, arpeggios on the MPC alone,
this is something i have always really struggled with, i tried again yesterday and managed a few squawks but eventually got 3 consecutive semitones. ( as this is so hard for me to do, it must be the thing i need to do)
 
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This thread has been a great help to me, hopefully it has been helpful to plenty of other people too.

Thanks everyone, it is very much appreciated!

My plan starting today is practice on the Mouthpiece during the
What‘s your setup?
I use a high baffle mouthpiece, 8 tip opening la voz medium hard reed,

I am using a more classical mouthpiece with a 6 tip opening and a la Voz medium reed for the MPC exercises
 
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This thread has been a great help to me, hopefully it has been helpful to plenty of other people too.

Thanks everyone, it is very much appreciated!

Please keep any thoughts and ideas coming
 

Ivan

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I did see an exercise on YouTube where you play the lower octave while pressing the octave key. Apparently you can't hit the notes unless your throat is open,. Whether this is good practice I don't know
This is along the lines of that taught by an excellent saxophone tutor not a million miles from this Café

Play Bb3, keep the note but finger Bb1 and maintain the harmonic. You can do the same for B, C and C#. This exercise has resulted in me better understanding and developing my embouchure
 
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Ballymenaboy

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Technique is a means to an end, not an end in itself..
Most of the 'rules' seem to come from classical saxophone methods and I don't listen to or play classical saxophone, so why be restricted by their methods? Would you go to a classical guitar teacher to learn to play the blues?
I'll take on board advice from anywhere, but if it doesn't work for me then I'll find another way

Personally I've never worried about any of this stuff about biting or how tight or loose my embouchure is, life's too short., I do what's necessary to get what I want out of the instrument - exactly how much pressure I apply with my lip and exactly where on the reed I apply it is crucial for altissimo and multiphonics.
All parameters are variable and open to experimentation in the cause of self expression, why limit yourself?
For me the embouchure is in a constant state of flux, shaping each note the way I want it. - classical players seem to want every note to sound the same, I want every note to have it's own individual personality, I'm a human being, not a sequencer.

One of my friends studied with Eugene Rousseau and asked him which techniques were considered legitimate. The reply was that "any technique is legitimate if it achieves the desired results" - the latter part of that sentence being crucial in that you have to understand clearly what results you desire.

I am of course a dangerous libertine with no regard for authority, so feel free to ignore any of the above
Surely it doesn't matter how you hit the notes as long as you can hit them - embrouchure is a very subjective subject but sometimes we can overthink things and overlook the objective
 
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Maybe you find this useful.
Bb to B is a point for change in voicing from head voice to falsetto (roughly):

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xAdhYakCsg&t=65s


One may argue that chest voice, head voice, are also very vague terms.
It's just about resonance, the voice is always at the same place :)

Cheers, Guenne
Thanks for that, very interesting Indeed,. It is exactly what I need to be doing. It's just a matter of fully understanding what he's saying. It looks as though it may be a book worth having.
 
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I had the same facial expression the other day but in hindsight I put it down to tight underpants as opposed to my
embrouchoure -having said that my facial expression might be generally contorted -I think I will stop looking at myself and solve the problem
You might have a good point there, next time I play I'll go commando
 

Pete Effamy

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Maybe you find this useful.
Bb to B is a point for change in voicing from head voice to falsetto (roughly):

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xAdhYakCsg&t=65s


One may argue that chest voice, head voice, are also very vague terms.
It's just about resonance, the voice is always at the same place :)

Cheers, Guenne
The main problem to learning a wind instrument is that the mechanics cannot be seen, or particularly felt and therefore visualisation and analogy are really important.

At least string players and pianists don’t have this problem....
 
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