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Wine

CliveMA

Member
Messages
783
Location
Brisbane, QLD, Australia
I am partial to Spain's Barbadillo Pedro Ximenez Sherry (I call it Port). Lush raisin flavours, richly sweet.

Junmai Sake, too. Perfect with all Asian food. (My wife is Malaysian and we eat Asian food every day). I like Sake both hot and cold (Yes, even at the same time!) and prefer Junmai style.

Canadian Ice Wine. Best served at Niagara Falls. Very hard to get in Australia.

Various Dessert wines although I don't have them for dessert but rather for any time! These are my Australian substitutes for Ice Wine.

Oh and someone pass the chocolate, preferably Cadbury's Jamaica Rum dark chocolate. :p
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Café Supporter
Messages
6,127
Location
Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
The Pedro Ximenez is very sweet in the manner of a dessert wine. Eiswein is in general difficult to find due to it being both rare (due to how it's made) and inevitably expensive. Something like a half-bottle of German or Austrian eiswein will be at least £30 in the UK.

German trockenbeerenauslese aka TBA is my preferred dessert wine, but it's very expensive, so I usually opt for the much cheaper Aussie ones, some of which are very good.
 

randulo

Living the dream
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Messages
5,679
Location
France
Have any of you had Grüner Veltliner? It's very nice with Asian food. Occasionally, I'll see it at an affordable price in the supermarket.


An article by Jancis Robinson explains it better:

 

Nikki

Formerly SaxyNikki
Café Supporter
Messages
976
Location
Canada
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It’s belated but still:
 
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Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Café Supporter
Messages
6,127
Location
Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
I toured three wineries on my recent trip to Waiheke Island in New Zealand. It was interesting that one vineyard would grow so many varieties of grape. Mudbrick for example has Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Petit Verdot, Merlot, Tempranillo, and Cabernet Franc for its reds, and Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, and Viognier for white.

I found I enjoyed the Pinot Gris wines a lot.

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John Setchell

Member
Messages
139
Location
Norfolk UK
I reckon the English Chapel Down wines, white red or pink, can't be beat, especially the Bacchus and especially when it's on offer.
Bacchus is a bit of a “Marmite” grape in my experience. People either love it or hate it.
Just lately I’ve been devouring Sicilian Negro Oro white, which is made by the Appassimento method of drying some of the grapes - much like the Amarone reds but much cheaper.
Cheers!
 

DavidUK

Well-Known Member
Café Supporter
Messages
5,517
Location
Near Lutterworth, Leics.
When I was younger, around 22, my father, a rather snobbish wine merchant, asked me to blind guess a wine during a visit to his for Sunday lunch. I'll always remember the look of shock when I sipped and immediately said "Torres Gran Coronas Black Label 1973." If, like me, you'd tasted it once you'd also have sought to ensure you always remembered what it was. Delicious.
 

John Setchell

Member
Messages
139
Location
Norfolk UK
When I was younger, around 22, my father, a rather snobbish wine merchant, asked me to blind guess a wine during a visit to his for Sunday lunch. I'll always remember the look of shock when I sipped and immediately said "Torres Gran Coronas Black Label 1973." If, like me, you'd tasted it once you'd also have sought to ensure you always remembered what it was. Delicious.
Yep - Torres do some lovely stuff.
 

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