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What really gets on your nerves!!

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,432
Ian, your list is like so random? No doubt that blows out any chance of you buying me a drink on 10 April!

Actually I agree lots of that. I don't have a problem with Americanised spelling as such. I wonder whether an etymologist would say that we are seeing the development of a separate but similar language to English. That would not be surprising given the mix of diffrent nationalities and indigenous peoples of North America and a need for standardised spelling. However, that doesn't mean we have to accept that spelling in the UK where we may have a different reason for spelling words in a particular way. Has anyone else noticed, as well, the trend towards missing and out in numbers, eg "Two thousand ten". A literal translation from some other languages gives that, but it is not English.

Interesting that this seems to apply more to spelling than to actual nouns. We have not substituted American "trunk" or "hood" for our "boot" and "bonnet".

On the other hand, I have no problem accepting new words with a specific meaning from other langauages. English has a long history of that. I am thinking of words like "program" with its particular meaning in IT. But I differentiate that from a broadcast programme.

Finllay, has anyone noticed the trend by newsreaders and weather forecasters, even on the BBC, to say "slippy". Any TV or radio presenters on here, please note the correct word is "slippery"!

Colin
 

Nick Cook

Member
Messages
864
Way too much to list here, I'd be at all day. >:)

Here's a few some of which have been mentioned before:

Words spelt in the american manner! - I work for an English company with a small US office. We had to change all our wording as they (in the US) just think we can't spell words like labour, colour, rationalise etc etc

People who invade my space or just walk in front of me making me stop or change direction especially when I am in London or on the tube!

Incorrect and lazy use of English be it verbalisation of nouns, incorrect use of words, especially on the BBC

Celts (and others) who think they are extra special because they are x or y nationality and who spout on endlessly about the homeland whilst living and working over here whereas if I express any nationalistic tendencies (about being English English) I am accused of being a racist

Anyone who use the term like in the context of "Well she was like, hello and I was like, no way"

Anyone who's voice raises at the end of a sentence

The use of the word random to describe something that quite clearly isn't! As in "I can't believe you said that, you're so random" when I merely said to my daughter, " no we don't watch that here - in reference to Big Brother)"

Drivers (women :w00t:) who stop at roundabouts for no reason whatsoever

Text speak

I'd best end here but I have a few more I could list!!

Fantastic!!! I agree with all of those!!!
 

Nick Cook

Member
Messages
864
People who tailgate me through the car park barrier at work, just because they can't be a**ed to wind down their windows and use their own keys. I make a habit now of stopping when I'm just through the barrier, in the hope it'll drop onto their cars. Yes folks, I'm that mean.
Love it!! I'll have to try that one too!!
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,550
Ian, your list is like so random? No doubt that blows out any chance of you buying me a drink on 10 April!

Interesting that this seems to apply more to spelling than to actual nouns. We have not substituted American "trunk" or "hood" for our "boot" and "bonnet".Colin
As my number one 'soldier', did you not say on your return from settling a recent misunderstanding, "I booted 'im in the trunk an' bonnet for being in our 'ood"?

After due consideration I agree with your (plural) objections to non-English spelling. As Chaucer is a little dated, suggest that we all adopt the best English spelling as used by William Shakespeare although that is not how he spelt his name.
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,432
Bill
Yes, that was in the vernacular.

Oh come on, let's go back to Chaucer. It's nearly the right time of year:

Whan that Aprill, with his shoures soote
The droghte of March hath perced to the roote
And bathed every veyne in swich licour,
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;

Colin
 

RedBottom

Member
Messages
191
Love it!! I'll have to try that one too!!
It hasn't worked yet, but you should see them squirm when they think it's going to happen.

The Polish car valeting man on the corner does a lot more business when I'm around, I can tell you!;}
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
Subscriber
Messages
8,675
And "there", "their" and "they're"!!
That reminds me of another one.
People who say "he slash she" and "his slash her's" because they don't know they and their's are used as a singular when gender is unkown.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,971
That's also incorrect in english - it should be 'he or she'.
 
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Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
13,200
That's also incorrect in english - it should be 'he or she'.
Or 'it'

I believe 'they' is becoming accepted as a singular when you don't know the sex. Whether right or not I think it's a bit more elegant than 'he/she'
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,971
Or 'it'

I believe 'they' is becoming accepted as a singular when you don't know the sex. Whether right or not I think it's a bit more elegant than 'he/she'
true, but 'they' sounds contrived to me. I'd prefer the language to evolve in a more elegant way.
 

half diminished

Senior Member
Messages
1,343
OK, two more.........

This Ali G way of speaking - it was funny 20 years ago but now a whole generation of white people from the central southern/eastern side of the UK speak like it.

Trousers that are so low you can see there arse - or at least their pants at cheek level! What's all that about?
 
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