The Worst Gig I Ever Played

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544
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Mount Erebus, Antarctica
#25
It was certainly a different time in the early to mid 1970s WMCs back then. For one thing, the comedians told different jokes. There were mother-in-law jokes, "blue" jokes and double entendres. Additionally, there were jokes you couldn't tell in 2018 e.g. wisecracks about (and I'm choosing my words very carefully here!) the IQ rating of people originating from the Republic of Ireland, stereotypical attributes of men from African countries, vocal impressions of people originating from Pakistan, and impressions of camp homosexuals etc. All were considered fair game. Political correctness simply didn't exist back then.

I remember in the 1970s you could walk into any gunshop in the UK and buy a pack of 12-bore shot-gun cartridges over the counter. No certificate/paperwork was required and no questions were asked. If you were aged over 18 anyone could do it. Yes, anyone. No records were kept and no controls were in force. Buying a carton of shotgun ammo was every bit as straightforward as picking up a loaf of bread from the bakers on the way home. Incredible, when I look back on it now now. Like I said, a vanished world. I'd go back there in a heart-beat if the chance arose, because it would be a wonderful opportunity to meet again some of the long-dead people I've loved and lost.

LP Hartley was right when he said:- "The past is a foreign country. They do things differently there."
 

Alice

Psychedelic
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Kent
#26
It was certainly a different time in the early to mid 1970s WMCs back then. For one thing, the comedians told different jokes. There were mother-in-law jokes, "blue" jokes and double entendres. Additionally, there were jokes you couldn't tell in 2018 e.g. wisecracks about (and I'm choosing my words very carefully here!) the IQ rating of people originating from the Republic of Ireland, stereotypical attributes of men from African countries, vocal impressions of people originating from Pakistan, and impressions of camp homosexuals etc. All were considered fair game. Political correctness simply didn't exist back then.

I remember in the 1970s you could walk into any gunshop in the UK and buy a pack of 12-bore shot-gun cartridges over the counter. No certificate/paperwork was required and no questions were asked. If you were aged over 18 anyone could do it. Yes, anyone. No records were kept and no controls were in force. Buying a carton of shotgun ammo was every bit as straightforward as picking up a loaf of bread from the bakers on the way home. Incredible, when I look back on it now now. Like I said, a vanished world. I'd go back there in a heart-beat if the chance arose, because it would be a wonderful opportunity to meet again some of the long-dead people I've loved and lost.

LP Hartley was right when he said:- "The past is a foreign country. They do things differently there."
I know. My mother used to send me to the local shop when I was five with a note in my toy basket for 20 Rothmans and a carton of shotgun ammo :eek:
 
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Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
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Ilkley West Yorkshire
#28
The Sunday lunch gig at the Dalton Miners Welfare, or The Bag Inn as it was called was the regular haunt for our band. Stripper first, half an hour of us and bingo. The best stripper I saw danced to "My Boy Lollipop" while pulling lollies from her knickers. Still had the wrappers on thank goodness. When the "reveal" happened the drum and organ combo would stop playing to get a better view. The Good Old Days? I don't think so.
 
Messages
544
Location
Mount Erebus, Antarctica
#29
The Sunday lunch gig at the Dalton Miners Welfare, or The Bag Inn as it was called was the regular haunt for our band. Stripper first, half an hour of us and bingo. The best stripper I saw danced to "My Boy Lollipop" while pulling lollies from her knickers. Still had the wrappers on thank goodness. When the "reveal" happened the drum and organ combo would stop playing to get a better view. The Good Old Days? I don't think so.
It's so long ago I'd forgotten the strippers turning up at WMCs to do a turn. Needless to say coal-miners' wives generally didn't attend. I seem to remember that strippers would do a "standard show" for the club-members, then offer to do another turn which was "more spicy" - if enough people dropped a quid into the hat. Modesty forbids a detailed description of the "more spicy" show, but it can best be described as eye-catching. Good, clean, dirty fun.

Strange to think that all those gorgeous, gum-chewing, haughty & disdainful dollybirds in their sparkly G-strings will now be pensioners in their 60s. Tempus fugit. God bless 'em all!
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
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2,694
Location
Ilkley West Yorkshire
#30
Yes @Tomasz Stripper Sunday was boys only. Most blokes didn't even watch the turn. I used to feel so sorry for the girls, but one lold me what she earned and it was twice what we got for the gig. And I'd got longer hair than her.
 
Messages
544
Location
Mount Erebus, Antarctica
#32
Yes @Tomasz Stripper Sunday was boys only. Most blokes didn't even watch the turn. I used to feel so sorry for the girls, but one lold me what she earned and it was twice what we got for the gig. And I'd got longer hair than her.
It's many years ago now, but I seem to recall that the general "nudge-nudge, wink-wink" atmosphere resembled this scene from "Carry On Behind". Of course the strippers brought their own recorded music, but our band would have happily provided a live accompaniment if it had been requested. From the bar, you could hardly make out what a stripper was (or wasn't) wearing due to the dense blue fug of tobacco smoke hanging in the room. Halcyon days:-

Stripper in a Carry On Film (1975)
 
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Alice

Psychedelic
Subscriber
Messages
4,970
Location
Kent
#39
It's many years ago now, but I seem to recall that the general "nudge-nudge, wink-wink" atmosphere resembled this scene from "Carry On Behind". Of course the strippers brought their own recorded music, but our band would have happily provided a live accompaniment if it had been requested. From the bar, you could hardly make out what a stripper was (or wasn't) wearing due to the dense blue fug of tobacco smoke hanging in the room. Halcyon days:-

Stripper in a Carry On Film (1975)
I can’t really remember this film but there is a certain familiarity about it. I watched this clip and mostly thought how sweet it was... so sedate in comparison to a strip club today. Not that I’ve ever been to any... apart from one “Chippendale” hen night, which was absolutely unbelievable. I was expecting David Dickinson and some sort of “Bargain Hunt.”
 
Messages
544
Location
Mount Erebus, Antarctica
#40
I can’t really remember this film but there is a certain familiarity about it. I watched this clip and mostly thought how sweet it was... so sedate in comparison to a strip club today. Not that I’ve ever been to any... apart from one “Chippendale” hen night, which was absolutely unbelievable. I was expecting David Dickinson and some sort of “Bargain Hunt.”
Listen carefully to the strippers' music in that clip. Saxophones are heavily featured.
 
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