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Jazz standards in Education

jbtsax

old and opinionated
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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
I don't understand how the word jazz is implied by (or to be inferred from) aspiring young musicians. This seems to be the whole crux of various misunderstaings. Neither I nor (I think) Wade would deny that standards or jazz standrads are important in jazz education, but the thread seemed to be about music education in general.
Let me say it another way. "Aspiring young musician" was my choice of words and in my mind I was thinking of someone learning to play jazz.
 

Caz

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110
New standards are allready appering; snarky puppys "lingus" is pretty much on every highschool bigbands setlist. It seems like kids today play what they think is cool and fun :)
 

Jazzaferri

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As an aside I've been playing in a Gypsy Jazz group in festivals for a few years. Yea, sax isn't a prime instrument, but they like me to be in there anyway. Gypsy Jazz is another example of improvisation that's not based on mainstream standards and a lighter style of playing that crosses over to dance. The sax is an amazing and versatile instrument that can fit into many situations with a lot of different ways of improvising...and that's the point. Gypsy Jazz is light fun that's not as preoccupied with everybody trying to impress the audience with their technical prowess. It does all sound "samey" after a while, so is best in small doses, kind of like Dixieland. The pay sucks, but hey, it's another fun style of gig. One thing I can say for sure: they would NOT want to hear a mainstream style player as the attitude and style does not fit.
There is a clip of James Carter playing with the Rosenberg Trio. He gets going in his incredibly notey way and after a bit you can see the band starting to laugh a bit. It was impressive but sooo over the top given what was going on in the background.

Django loved to play with sax and clarinet players. While some it can be "samey" the young French guys are really braking out of that mould.

Check this one out

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ndalUPwjM0
 

Jazzaferri

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Victoria BC Canada
A good bit of the GJ book is taken from Jazz standards. The GJ band that I am in, Swingsation, features a female vocalist as I have found, audiences relate much better to our material with a singer. We keep em fairly shortand mix up the rhytm styles to try and avoid the "sameyness" which I do acknowledge is something that requires work to avoid.

AS far as standards go, when I was doing my jazz degree several years ago there were auite a number of 50's to 80's jazz numbers that had become "standards" I always understood this to mean, if one were a jazz sideman, they were the songs that one would know and have as part of one's repertoire.
 

Wade Cornell

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New Zealand and Australia
There is a clip of James Carter playing with the Rosenberg Trio. He gets going in his incredibly notey way and after a bit you can see the band starting to laugh a bit. It was impressive but sooo over the top given what was going on in the background.

Django loved to play with sax and clarinet players. While some it can be "samey" the young French guys are really braking out of that mould.

Check this one out

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ndalUPwjM0
Sounds like a lot of middle eastern/Klezmer influence. A Django style guitar, but not really Django style music. Liked this track a lot. wonderful musicianship and great sound.