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How imprinted are you?

Targa

Among the pigeons
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Here’s a hypothesis for you:
“Pythagorus killed popular music. Before him music was owned, played, danced to and enjoyed by everyone. After him it became property of The Intellectuals, and everyone else became The Audience”
Being a Libran I can see both sides of this argument.
Pythagorus just liked the squares.
 

Vetinari

Senior Member
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East Manchester
I like most music, from all eras, the exceptions being individual tracks from various bands whose music I usually enjoy.
General dislikes are excessivley screamed/shouted and heavey metal, also modern disco rhythm only and rap are definately dislikes.
As far as playing then every thing brought to the Cafe ensemble by @Tenor Viol (stone age to modern) and @chadders is great. One exception being One day like this, as my baritone line is about 50 identical bars of low D, top D.
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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Whitchurch, North Shropshire UK
...
As far as playing then every thing brought to the Cafe ensemble by @Tenor Viol (stone age to modern) and @chadders is great. One exception being One day like this, as my baritone line is about 50 identical bars of low D, top D.
I'll have you know that none of it is Stone Age, Renaissance C16th maybe... :w00t:
 

ESJohn

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Ohio USA
I hope I am answering this question appropriately. Please let me know if this is not the original focus of your question.

I enjoy a fairly large variety of music and the sources of that enjoyment has come from events and experiences over most of my life from childhood and the years of youth and adulthood.
1. Early Rock--I'm the youngest of three (all boys) and am 66 years old. We had an old (40's era, tubes and all!) radio in my dad's basement work room that was on most of the time. My oldest brother still had the radio. I remember the songs from 1960 through 1973 as the genre changed from Elvis to The Beach Boys to Strawberry Alarm Clock and then Bread and The Carpenters. All on the AM dial of course! I was actually witnessing music history as I grew up but didn't realize it at the time. In the mid 70's (my teen years) there was a real revival of this music and many radio stations focused solely on it while others spent their drive times to it. My wife is astounded sometimes when I name a song from that era as it first begins to play. I'm not sure what the state of rock (or music in general) is at this time. It seems that we've lost the appreciation of music overall.
2. Strauss (Johann Sr and Jr and Josef)--I first heard this music when I watched 2001 A Space Odyssey. You might remember that the first scenes in space have that music playing in the background. I also followed The Strauss Family on TV when it first aired. In fact, my wife and I had just enjoyed watching that series together just a few months ago.
3. Barbershop--In my high school senior year, the school play was The Music Man. The marching band had a part at the end when the mayor cries out "Where is the band?? We all marched up the aisles and played 76 Trombones. I love it to this day and my wife has surprised me a few times with tickets to Barbershop concerts over the years!
4. Big Band Era--One Christmas I purchased some music CD's for my parents since they had been young adults. It turned out that they didn't care to listen to them so I somehow got them back and began listening to them. I found that I enjoyed them quite a bit! Being an armchair history buff tended to reinforce my pleasure as I try to reach back and understand that era.
5. Classical--This is somewhat limited. I love Handel's Messiah. We were able to go to see that a few years ago at a local high school. My brother had a love for Bach in his youth. Maybe that was because he played trumpet.
6. Marches--I never tire of Sousa and other patriotic fare. Along with myself, one of my brothers was also in the marching band in his high school years so I grew up on that tempo.
7. Hymns of the church--I grew up in and still attend church regularly. I am ministered to, sometimes, more by the music I hear then the messages preached. HIs Eye is on the Sparrow can bring a few tears to my eyes at the right moment.
8. Classic Country--In the 80's and early 90's my sales territory covered a fair slice of West Virginia. In those days, AM was mostly music, not talk. I was more or less forced to listen to Country and really developed a love for Randy Travis, The Judds, etc.

I think that is it for the most part. It is a long list, and I think that is a good thing.
 

turf3

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500
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Earth
Well, my early teen years coincided with the absolute worst period of pop music - 1974 to 1980. Disco, soft rock, etc. I and all my friends simply looked backward to the period 1962-1972; one of the most fertile periods in popular music ever. So basically we all got "imprinted" with the music of our older siblings and cousins.
 

Ballymenaboy

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267
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Ballymena.Co.Antrim
Born in 1945 so the sixties were my musical grounding in an Irish Showband playing anything from Wild Thing to Ave Maria..nothing taxing.
Developed a catholic taste in music (easily misunderstood phrase in N.Ireland)
After a break of c40yrs started to play again and got hooked on Jazz imprinting on Stan Getz and Paul Desmond however recently been listening to Spyro Gyra and re imprinting..if a duck can do it so can I.
 

jbtsax

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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
What a wonderful discussion this has been---one of the best at the Cafe IMO. Thanks @Wade Cornell for introducing the topic. One thing I have found is that my musical tastes have grown more conservative as I get older. That is not to say that I am not continuously discovering genres and styles of music I enjoy that I have not listened to before. My more recent ones have been "British Brass Band" literature, Gypsy Jazz, and "Traditional Jazz" (formerly called "Dixieland"). Yeah, I know I am a few decades behind others discovery of them, but you should realize I live in Utah where when you cross the state line, you have to turn your watch back 20 years. :rolleyes:
 

Wade Cornell

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New Zealand and Australia
What a wonderful discussion this has been---one of the best at the Cafe IMO. Thanks @Wade Cornell for introducing the topic. One thing I have found is that my musical tastes have grown more conservative as I get older. That is not to say that I am not continuously discovering genres and styles of music I enjoy that I have not listened to before. My more recent ones have been "British Brass Band" literature, Gypsy Jazz, and "Traditional Jazz" (formerly called "Dixieland"). Yeah, I know I am a few decades behind others discovery of them, but you should realize I live in Utah where when you cross the state line, you have to turn your watch back 20 years. :rolleyes:
More than alright to turn the clocks back when going to Utah. When I've visited there it's more like turning back the geological history that's evident in the land. The most stunning place on earth to visit. And the natives are friendly!

Going to New Zealand to live in the 1980s was also a turning back the clocks exercise. One of the first houses I lived in did have a phone though. You picked up the hand-piece and cranked the handle. Mable would answer and you told her the number you wanted. If it was local there were only three digits... or you could just tell her who you wanted to speak to. You had to be careful though as it was a "party line" so around 10 other houses shared the same phone line. You knew when the phone rang if it was for you by the pattern of rings. You never discussed personal stuff as it was likely someone else was listening!

The imprinting thing is an interesting phenomena. One can just embrace it and enjoy, or challenge yourself to be continually amazed and inspired by something that's new to you. We each draw our own limits. So glad that the members have used this opportunity to take those little journeys to explore their tastes and especially thank those who offered musical challenges.
 
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ESJohn

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Ohio USA
Well, my early teen years coincided with the absolute worst period of pop music - 1974 to 1980. Disco, soft rock, etc. I and all my friends simply looked backward to the period 1962-1972; one of the most fertile periods in popular music ever. So basically we all got "imprinted" with the music of our older siblings and cousins.
Yes, those years were strange. I remember a conversation with my sons and telling them how tired and lost those years were. The Vietnam war was over (I registered for the draft in '73 but was never called). The drug culture was mostly silent but there, and I don't think there was any one direction that music was headed.
Here are the "top 10" tunes of 1975:
 

turf3

Member
Messages
500
Locality
Earth
Even though I was only 13 when the war ended, I had been convinced since earliest childhood that as soon as I turned 18 I'd be drafted and sent to Vietnam. After all, the war had been going on almost my entire life. Even now, near 60, somewhere in the back of my mind I still harbor ideas about how I could get out of the draft...

Just think of the 70s - disco; soft rock; the pitiful end of the Vietnam war with the first clear defeat of the US in war; the armed forces ridden with drugs and futility; double digit inflation; Nixon having the big fires in the White House fireplaces with the AC going full blast in the summer while implementing wage and price controls; the first oil crisis; 55 mph speed limits; year round daylight savings time meant you were always going to school/work or coming home in the dark; gas lines; Watergate; Jimmy Carter's failed presidency; the second oil crisis; the SLA and Patty Hearst; the Iranian revolution and the hostages held for 444 days; the explosion of crime in the cities; the hippies losing their dynamism and critique of American society and just descending into drugginess; cocaine; etc., etc., etc. In the 20th century that period is second in miserableness only to the Great Depression.
 

ESJohn

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Ohio USA
What a wonderful discussion this has been---one of the best at the Cafe IMO. Thanks @Wade Cornell for introducing the topic.
Looking over the many entries, I'd also like to thank bogdonly for reviving it! I would have totally missed the conversation without either one. Very thought provoking...I left for work 20 minutes later than usual this morning just because I had to throw my thoughts out there!
Looking forward to hearing of even more experiences!
 

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