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How imprinted are you?

Jeanette

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What I forgot to say was there have been other clips, not on this thread where I too have found 4 seconds more than enough. Not from nowhere did we get the saying "music to my ears" :)

Jx
 
D

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you’re welcome wade, don’t forget something classed as an object is just something made up in your minds and universally accepted (if you can feel something solid, it’s an object, if you can feel the music it’s an object). In the world of AI, everything is classed as objects. What probably started out as a form of communication, may have evolved a side product which today some people class as music.

When our brain switches on in the early years, there’s something else in the mind that automatically says ‘ i don’t like this’ , or ‘i like this’ way before we become aware of our environment or conditioned by our environment (another vague term for imprinting).

I could go on all day taking everything apart, but i won’t do that, suffice to say it was an experience of taste much to my dislike... but there’s nothing wrong with that, no knowledge is gained without debate, on both sides of the coin.

Another interesting topic, the phrase ‘a civilised country’ ? based on the behaviour of so called ‘civilised’ countries and looking back at their track records, is it just something to hide behind to make themselves feel better?
 

specs

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My first ever muse was a genuine Grandma washboard (I know a sax is different but I'm working on that. Trust me).
Thus I learned that happiness is a rock solid rhythm section.
As J.S.Bach put it "If it ain't got that swing, it don't mean a thing".
Swedish Johan Eliasson aka Bottleneck John knows a cool hydraulic pump when he hears it.
Archetypal. Synchonise your heartbeat.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5ZEYMl9VIs
 

Wade Cornell

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OK, everybody nice and settled down? Here's one that shouldn't be too challenging. This is the duduk. It's a double reed simple instrument that's incredibly hard to play well (I've tried and have one recording to prove it!). The video is a live performance with Jordi Savall's group. Jordi is playing the drone part on a Viola d'amore. I always think of the sax as pretty close to the human voice...this gets even closer and has a very soulful sound. It's an Armenian instrument. Their history is rather tragic, and that possibly has some influence on the style/sound.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdA1TrlDwAA
 

Dave Dunn

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South Australia
This could have been titled
"What music do you play on your birthday?"
For me, it's Kiss, Adam and the Ants, Shakin'Stevens, Stray Cats, Judas Priest, W.A.S.P., Motley Crue, Twisted Sister, Sex Pistols, Motorhead, and Neil Diamond!
So yes, very imprinted, if I liked it when between 8 and 18, I still like it, and play the same or similar music to this day, on the Stereo or on an instrument.
 

springerwen

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Quebec
It's a marketing move, jazz is relaxing us.
I don't think you have a full understanding of what is being discussed here. The author has asked about the music that represents as best of all. For example, my kids are imprinted on K-pop. 韓流ウォッチ!! is their youtube, lol. If it wasn't for me, they would play this music all day long and at night in their headphones. It's true, jazz music is very relaxing. That is why it is widely played in restaurants and bars. Yet, this doesn't mean that someone cannot imprint on jazz music. Hope that makes sense!
 

Clivey

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I don't think you have a full understanding of what is being discussed here. The author has asked about the music that represents as best of all. For example, my kids are imprinted on K-pop. 韓流ウォッチ!! is their youtube, lol. If it wasn't for me, they would play this music all day long and at night in their headphones. It's true, jazz music is very relaxing. That is why it is widely played in restaurants and bars. Yet, this doesn't mean that someone cannot imprint on jazz music. Hope that makes sense!
Oh apart from that. Thanks for the link you posted.
I like these eastern genres since the final fantasy games and further back to even chip music Vic,NES, etc.
They would have been classed as EDM a bit back .
There will be fantastic pieces out there, full of sax and other stuff.
People from my demographic just don't get to hear it as there really is no proper new music shows on mainstream TV.
 

turf3

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Earth
Well, I was born in '62 so the music of my adolescence was crappy 1970s pop and disco. I HATED it then, and I HATE it now. Muskrat Love. Evergreen. MacArthur Park. Love will Keep us Together. What a Fool Believes. Tie a Yellow Ribbon. You Light up my Life. Staying Alive (ah ah ah ah, staying alive, staying alive...)

Fortunately, the great nostalgia wave of the 1970s allowed us to hear a lot of older music (rock from the 1960s, for example). I was always looking backward.

So, NO, the music that was au courant during that "imprinting" period is NOT something that I would want to revisit.
 

Dave Dunn

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South Australia
Well, I was born in '62 so the music of my adolescence was crappy 1970s pop and disco. I HATED it then, and I HATE it now. Muskrat Love. Evergreen. MacArthur Park. Love will Keep us Together. What a Fool Believes. Tie a Yellow Ribbon. You Light up my Life. Staying Alive (ah ah ah ah, staying alive, staying alive...)

Fortunately, the great nostalgia wave of the 1970s allowed us to hear a lot of older music (rock from the 1960s, for example). I was always looking backward.

So, NO, the music that was au courant during that "imprinting" period is NOT something that I would want to revisit.
My bandmates of the same age or older are still stuck on Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and Black Sabbath, we bonded over 50s and 60s music though. To this day they still try and slip in some of the easy listening music you mention, or as I like to call it, Soft C... Rock. :)
 

Sue

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I’m quite nostalgic about the music I heard between the ages of 4 and 17. My nana had a pub with a jukebox and anything I hear that was played on that jukebox, no matter how crap it was, takes me right back there. I have a love of rock n roll music as that’s what my dad played at that time. My memories of school are invoked when I hear the early boy band, Bay City Rollers, Osmonds etc. I don’t actively seek to listen to any of that music but it makes me feel good when I hear it because it brings back great memories. My favourite musicians are probably from music I was introduced to after those ages.
 

Jules

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I’ve been thinking a lot about this of recent. My parents were big music fans and I was brought up on classical, quite churchy, music and Celtic stuff such as the Chieftains. Neither has really stuck with me as primary listening but I’ve come to realise its seeped into my practice on a subconscious level- I’m sure my soprano line here is deeply influenced by the music of my distant youth.
Ok -it filtered via Portico Quartet, Jan Garbarek, John Surman etc- but this probably also explains why I'm drawn to that type of sound. Actually- throw into the mix Kate Bush & Peter Gabriel, who I listened to a lot back in the day and a large proportion of my default musical settings drop into context

 
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7201

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I’m similar to Jules in having a musical taste honed by my parents making music at home, and their tastes that went with it.

My dad was into military band music, Revivalist British Trad Jazz bands and the Dutch Swing College band, and Swing bands like Miller. He loved Bing Crosby, Michael Holliday and Nat Cole.

My mum liked some classical music like Chopin, and The Carpenters, Chrystal Gayle and pianists like Ronnie Aldrich and Bobby Crush.

They both liked James Last.

I was 10 in 1977, but listened to no-one, let alone liked anyone or anything in “the hit parade”.

I don’t think that I became a fan of The Beatles until my early 20s.

Much of my youth was spent with Terry Wogan’s Wake Up To Wogan on BBC Radio 2 as a background to my mum’s housework. Working alongside Terry years later and a fair few of the artists that he played on his show back then was both bizarre and a thrill.

If this upbringing shaped my broad taste in music then I’m forever grateful.
 

Hipparion

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Nantes
Some challenging music ? I am glad I know it does exist, but would I listen to that for hours ? I am pretty sure not. (I am still going back to it from time to time though)

About being imprinted, funnily enough I think I listen to at least as much diverse music now than I ever did in my teenage years and 20s. And back then I was exposed to many styles already (special thanks to my music lovers of parents !).

I think I am still kind of 'imprinted' though: when I listen again to many of the things I listened to back then (especially in my teenage years), the Proust effect kicks in and I find I still like (most of) what I liked. But - for the most part - I don't really try to play any of it though...
 

Yansalis

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USA
I am 'imprinted' with the music of my first decade. I feel a nostalgic pleasure when hearing the popular music of the '60s, and also from my second decade. But I do not consider this the best music. Nor do I consider the music I independently sought out and discovered in my teen years to be the best music (film soundtracks mostly). I am very fond of the classical music I discovered in my 20's, but it is old to me, I have heard it too many times. I crave new music, and for this reason I will listen to just about anything once. I go through phases of listening to things like the tamer Steve Lacy albums, or chasing 20th century British symphonies to find the occasional worthwhile discovery. But I doubt I will find what I wish I would find--great new music that captures a complex but positive vision of human possibilities. Despair, anxiety, morose navel-gazing, shattered cognition and mindless thumping I can find in quantity though.
 

John Setchell

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Norfolk UK
Numerous studies have shown that humans imprint on a style of music associated with a period between adolescence and 20 something. These are formative years in which we actively disassociate with music and taste of our parents and instead take up the prevalent music of our peers.

As people who actively engage in music making (and the music is seldom from our "imprint years"), I'm curious to hear where individuals have drawn lines as to what they will listen to and what get's shut out. Is there a strong desire to play music from those imprint years? Have some (all?) of you evolved past thinking whatever you listened to at age 18 was the best music of all time? What's the "furthest out" music that you enjoy and would like to share and see if others ears are open?

This is an invitation to share, so hopefully there will be some respect for each person's "out there" choices. The real question is can you keep your mind and ears open to hear what might be special about that person's choices?

P.S. This is NOT and invitation to share your FAVORITE music...it's about stretching and opening our ears to styles, rhythms, harmonies etc. that we may have never heard.
Here’s a hypothesis for you:
“Pythagorus killed popular music. Before him music was owned, played, danced to and enjoyed by everyone. After him it became property of The Intellectuals, and everyone else became The Audience”
Being a Libran I can see both sides of this argument.
 

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