Healthy Breakfast; Overnight oats.

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
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#62
I had a quick read, I've never heard of thermodynamics being related to food,. I presume my calorie intake must be greater than the caroriies I burn as i feel as though I am getting heavier, I don't weigh myself and I've never counted a calorie in or out, I do push ups pull ups and Squats, muscle burns fat and a strong core is essential as one gets older
I just move about in hot temperatures for 7.5 hours a day. Never needed a gym. The only one I can't keep up with is my wife who has very long legs and fast cadence. I feel like a young child trying to keep up with an adult on a mission.
 

MandyH

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#64
I'm not convinced it is for a whole host of reasons, some addressed here:

Why “Calories in, Calories out” Doesn't Tell the Whole Story

And think about all those people that go on calorie restricted diets and lose the weight but then when they stop it all goes back with more.

Also consider how emotions can impact on eating

Jx
Of course the weight goes back on once they return to their normal eating.
That's what got them overweight in the first place. They haven't addressed their poor relationship with food.

If you develop (by whatever means) a good relationship with food, and understand what causes your weight gain, then you can adjust your normal food intake to be just the right amount to keep you at just the right weight.

However, if you follow some fad diet for 6 months and lose the weight, you can't just revert to your old eating regime and expect to keep the weight off. Your change in food intake has to be FOR LIFE. Which is why fad diets cannot work - no-one can put up with them for life.

You need a healthy eating plan that is sustainable for life.
Which is why I am a life-long member of Slimming World - it has worked FOR ME and I can still eat suitable food every day, 3 meals a day for life and enjoy every meal..

Also, emotions don't impact on eating, they impact on desire, the same as hormones impact on desire (for food).
You may WANT that food, but you do not NEED it.
If your desire to maintain a healthy weight does not exist, you are never going to maintain a healthy weight..
 

Alice

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#67
If only it were so simple :)

Jx
I'm not convinced it is for a whole host of reasons, some addressed here:

Why “Calories in, Calories out” Doesn't Tell the Whole Story

And think about all those people that go on calorie restricted diets and lose the weight but then when they stop it all goes back with more.

Also consider how emotions can impact on eating

Jx
i agree.... I’ve had a few friends who did Weight Watchers and lost a lot of weight quickly, but some of that was muscle mass. When they put weight on again it turned straight to fat.

I disagree ... Food is way more important than exercise for maintaining a good weight.
I don't exercise and never have!
That may be so. Muscle is heavier than fat. Further to what I said above in reply to Jeanette, it’s important to build muscle after losing weight and find out the best exercises to do that. Weight training isn’t always the best thing to do, nor jogging. Personally, I like to exercise because it makes me feel good.
 

Ivan

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#72
I disagree ... Food is way more important than exercise for maintaining a good weight.
I don't exercise and never have!
Your choice

But exercise (from walking to the car to running gaunt) is a part of the equation, no matter how little you do

If calories in exceed calories out you gain weight, and visa versa

Calories in = what you eat or drink

Calories out = metabolism + exercise

This view suits my style of thinking
 

MandyH

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#73
Your choice

But exercise (from walking to the car to running gaunt) is a part of the equation, no matter how little you do

If calories in exceed calories out you gain weight, and visa versa

Calories in = what you eat or drink

Calories out = metabolism + exercise

This view suits my style of thinking
Just existing burns 2000 (roughly) calories per day.

I have before now walked from my house to the top of the Worcestershire beacon. this is a horizontal distance of approx 8km and an assent of 375 metres. This extra exercise burns about 250 calories more.
You have to do an awful lot of exercise to justify eating one chocolate muffin!

It is better to get a control on your food, than try to exercise excess weight away.

You will always be able to have control of your food intake, however, ill health or old age will reduce your exercise options.

My son eats and burns 6000 calories a day. He is a military trainee, his whole life consists of activity and exercise, up to 20 hours every day.
 

MandyH

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#74
That may be so. Muscle is heavier than fat. Further to what I said above in reply to Jeanette, it’s important to build muscle after losing weight and find out the best exercises to do that. Weight training isn’t always the best thing to do, nor jogging. Personally, I like to exercise because it makes me feel good.
umm ... a pound of fat and a pound of muscle weigh the same - a pound!
Muscle is more dense, so takes up less volume,

I agree that being active and doing something that you enjoy is good for your mental health, and if you feel good mentally, then you are more likely to have a positive attitude which will help regardless of what approach you take to maintain a good weight.
 

Alice

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#75
umm ... a pound of fat and a pound of muscle weigh the same - a pound!
Muscle is more dense, so takes up less volume,

I agree that being active and doing something that you enjoy is good for your mental health, and if you feel good mentally, then you are more likely to have a positive attitude which will help regardless of what approach you take to maintain a good weight.
No... you’ve misunderstood what I meant, but my fault for not explaining properly. It’s true what you say but it’s also meaningless.
We don’t tend to have units of fat and muscle, so the weight per volume makes most sense in comparisons. As it happens, a pound of fat takes up approximately four times the space taken by a pound of muscle. Therefore, by common convention of English language communication – muscle does indeed weigh more than fat.
 

Targa

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#76

David Dorning

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#77
You will always be able to have control of your food intake, however, ill health or old age will reduce your exercise options.
Reduce/control food intake and you will lose weight. Reduce exercise and you will reduce your exercise options. The relevance of food and exercise vary depending on whether your objective is weight loss or long term health.
 

MandyH

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#79
Reduce/control food intake and you will lose weight. Reduce exercise and you will reduce your exercise options. The relevance of food and exercise vary depending on whether your objective is weight loss or long term health.
This got me thinking - I have tried to do some reading today around this idea, but I haven't established much.

A total non-mover has a shorter life expectancy than an obese person apparently. It seems that being virtually sedentary / couch potato reduces your life expectancy more than than being overweight does.

But after that, I haven't yet found much info, yet.

A "moderately active" person was described (somewhere) as someone who walks about 3 miles a day and does other normal levels of activity related to normal daily life. And it seems that by that level of activity then excess weight is more influential in reducing life expectancy than lack of activity.

And, I suspect the two are fairly closely related - if you are inactive, you may be overweight or obese. If you are active, you may be a lower weight.

That said, I'd suspect genetics and family history are fairly influential in all 3 - weight, activity and life expectancy.

... Goes off ... to prepare some overnight oats ;)
 
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