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G# Key (and low C# Key) - Two Questions

Ivan

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Just about every low A horn will close all the bell keys with the low A key. The question is how well do they seal. I still argue that the laws of physics keep the force of one thumb from working as well as one thumb plus one pinky, now matter how well the mechanism is designed
If one thumb is enough for a well made mechanism (worked beautifully on my Bauhaus this afternoon), you can rest that little finger and reserve it for some other activity
 

nigeld

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I just tried out my Yani B992 with a leak light, and if I have my finger on the low C# then pressing the low A closes the C# pad, but does not seal it completely. I never thought it would - the mechanism to close the C# when you press B or Bb has always seemed dodgy on all my saxes. Maybe it should close better than it does. I'll ask when I take it in tomorrow.
 
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turf3

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I just tried out my Yani B992 with a leak light, and if I have my finger on the low C# then pressing the low A closes the C# pad, but does not seal it completely. I never thought it would - the mechanism to close the C# when you press B or Bb has always seemed dodgy on all my saxes. Maybe it should close better than it does. I'll ask when I take it in tomorrow.
Yes, that mechanism had to be added when Selmer invented the tilting low Bb key because it's pretty much impossible to play B or Bb without pressing on the tilting linkage bar and opening the C#. Go with a Conn or Buescher and that linkage isn't needed, because your finger is more perpendicular to the keys and you won't be inadvertently opening C# when you play B or Bb. It's a Selmer kluge.
 

AndyB

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I've been playing saxophone for 40+ years and I have a couple of really basic questions - I guess we all keep learning !

1. When you are playing in sharp keys that include G# (A major, E major and beyond) - do you hold done the G# key all the time or just when playing G#s ?

Thanks in advance

Rhys
This doesn't work on my 50s Conn Pan Am tenor because the guy who rebuilt it did not bother replacing that piece of cork on the lever that makes it work. He also plays a Pan Am and when I asked him about it, he seemed surprised that anybody holds down the G#. He is both an outstanding player and sax technician so I assumed that me wanting to hold the G# down was wrong. It seems that a lot of people here agree. Glad you asked this question :)
 

Colin the Bear

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I feel wrong is too strong a word. The mechanism is designed to allow it. It's an option I wouldn't like to be without.
 

rhysonsax

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I found this page with some examples for recommended holding down of the G# key.


Interesting that some of those examples include A natural as well as G# and that is the note that seems to be made sharp by holding down the G# key.

But I guess that played quickly enough it probably wouldn't be noticeable.

Rhys
 

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