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Accessories Flight Case Recommendation

Ivan

Ivan

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This looks like genius

Any chance you could do step by step instructions, please @Wade Cornell ?

I would like to know how you control the foam to create a level surface in each half of the case because in my experience with the foam in cans it expands, then expands, then expands

Also how deep does the sax sit in the bottom half of the case? Does the sax sink like a stone, do you have to suspend it, does the sax sit proud of the lower half at all? If the sax pokes into the upper half of the case how do you manage the foam in the upper half? Etc.
 
Colin the Bear

Colin the Bear

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I don't think any case will survive some of the baggage handlers. The flight case with foam will protect from external knocks but the inertia of the horn as it lands from the equivalent of a 1st floor bedroom window (American 2nd floor) will cause damage or things to move. Check Youtube for baggage handlers and test your case by throwing it off the roof of your house.

A tenor wrapped in several layers of bubble wrap and packed in a sturdy box encased in expanded polystyrene may survive.

I've heard some disappointing stories about the level of compensation offered for instruments reduced to kindling.

It might be possible to buy a seat for your horn. It might cause less heart ache to beg or borrow a horn locally.
 
Veggie Dave

Veggie Dave

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That's my other option - leave two saxes behind.
 
thomsax

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I don't think any case will survive some of the baggage handlers. The flight case with foam will protect from external knocks but the inertia of the horn as it lands from the equivalent of a 1st floor bedroom window (American 2nd floor) will cause damage or things to move. Check Youtube for baggage handlers and test your case by throwing it off the roof of your house.

A tenor wrapped in several layers of bubble wrap and packed in a sturdy box encased in expanded polystyrene may survive.

I've heard some disappointing stories about the level of compensation offered for instruments reduced to kindling.

It might be possible to buy a seat for your horn. It might cause less heart ache to beg or borrow a horn locally.

My "The Martin Baritone" survided the trip (in the original case) from New York to Copenhagen. It went down. No bubble wrap or anything around the sax.. My wife brought it to me and there were no time for instructions how to pack the sax. I just told her to carry the neck and mouthpieces in her hand baggage, No damage at all on the sax. Maybe I was lucky.
 
Wade Cornell

Wade Cornell

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This looks like genius

Any chance you could do step by step instructions, please @Wade Cornell ?

I would like to know how you control the foam to create a level surface in each half of the case because in my experience with the foam in cans it expands, then expands, then expands

Also how deep does the sax sit in the bottom half of the case? Does the sax sink like a stone, do you have to suspend it, does the sax sit proud of the lower half at all? If the sax pokes into the upper half of the case how do you manage the foam in the upper half? Etc.

All good questions. You've got to be able to visualize where you're going to see your way through.
1. The sax is thoroughly wrapped in cling film.
2. The sax is placed on top of foam blocks (old packing material, Styrofoam etc.) in the position you want. Have it positioned so that it will be half way in the foam when the case is opened. This means that when the top half is closed it is encased.
3. Blow foam under and around the horn so that it extends just past the lip level of the case. This is tricky as you've got to have a feel for how much the foam expands, but can do just a little at a time. The horn may need to be held down if it's a small horn to ensure it's not lifted off your blocks.
4. let the foam set to hard.
5. Remove the horn. If bits of foam have gone over that half way point you may need to use a Stanley Knife to cut it free (carefully). It doesn't matter if some of the cling film gets damaged as you can re-wrap it.
6. Cut and sand off the foam so that it is level or just slightly below the lip of the case.
7. Re-wrap the horn in cling film.
8. This is a tricky part: put the horn back into the bottom half that you just finished and cut blocks of foam that are temporarily glued to the top half of the case. The lid of the case MUST be able to close easily, and the horn MUST NOT rattle/move in the case. This will take a bit of adjustment.
9. Open the case upside down and make sure that the horn has NOT moved position when sitting in the top half, If it has repeat # 8 until you have it right.
10. Blow foam repeating steps 3 to 6 for the top half.
11. Remove cling film from horn and anywhere stuck in the foam. Put the horn back in the case and ensure that the case closes and you have a good fit. Adjust with Stanley Knife and sand paper if too tight.
12. Purchase enough of a very 2-way stretchy fabric for lining both sides of the case. Lay one bit over the bottom half (loosely) and place the horn in the case. Place the other bit over the horn and see if you can close the case. Adjust the foam until the case closes.
13. Cut the fabric to fit with enough slack to ensure that the horn can rest on the bottom of the foam and is NOT held up by the fabric.
14. Using contact cement coat the foam and lightly brush on the glue to the fabric (don't soak it).
15. Press into place attaching the outside of the fabric to the case edge first, then pushing into the deepest parts of your form. This may need to be done "upside down" to ensure that other areas don't touch and stick first.
16. You should have a perfectly molded case. If it's too tight try to identify what area is high and use a hammer and tools that are NOT sharp to punch/push the foam down until a perfect fit.

If you can picture all of the above it's not as difficult as it sounds.
 
Ivan

Ivan

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You've got to be able to visualize where you're going to see your way through.
Nice and clear, thanks Wade

The thing that troubles is the whether molded, moulded or mo(u)lded is the spelling that best fits the anglophone continuum between your country of origin and the country in which you live
 
Wade Cornell

Wade Cornell

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Nice and clear, thanks Wade

The thing that troubles is the whether molded, moulded or mo(u)lded is the spelling that best fits the anglophone continuum between your country of origin and the country in which you live

It's worse than that. Am very dyslexic and ambidextrous. Not having a defined dominant hemisphere means I have no memory for spelling and depend on spell check for spelling as well as reversed letters. Also need to edit as I reverse word order often. Not a good look for a scientist and thankfully have a wife who is an excellent editor for papers to be published. I don't bother her for editing when posting stuff like this on line.

If you make a case post pictures as I'd like to see how it goes for you.

I also have the multi instrument case if anyone is interested to see pictures.
 
saxyjt

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I also have the multi instrument case if anyone is interested to see pictures.

You bet I'm interested. Please post!

I don't have a need for this but it's very interesting and I'm sure I can use that sometimes in the future...
 
Wade Cornell

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P1040044
P1040045
P1040046
P1040047
 
Jazzaferri

Jazzaferri

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Most tenor cases are not a guaranteed fit in an overhead bin. Therefore it is best to have a case that will withstand going through the maw of the baggage system. My Protech tenor has survived a number of baggage handlers. MyProtech alto has yet to be checked.

I gave my alto Hiscox to the Pro jazz musician Monik Nordine. It has survived a number of flights but I gather has not needed to be checked. A Hiscox big enough to fit one's tenor with a bit of med density foam added would likely survive most baggage handling mishaps. I have seen handlers chucking bags onto carts from 10 feet away and overshooting the top only to have to go around the cart and throw it up again. Most dont do that but if they are having a bad day...………………...

The carbon fiber cases are reported to survive been driven over by a cart tug but a $1200 are not cheap. Nothing else will withstand the worst that baggage handlers can throw.

As an ex commercial airplane pilot and Airport Authority board member of an airport authority I do have a better understanding than most.
 
thomsax

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I have seen handlers chucking bags onto carts from 10 feet away and overshooting the top only to have to go around the cart and throw it up again. Most dont do that but if they are having a bad day...………………...
How common is it?
 
Pete Thomas

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What I would like to see with many cases is more padding/protection above the top (tenon received) and the beneath the bottom (bis or sprain bell)

There is often plenty of padding laterally but very little in the places that are vulnerable ion the case is drooped and lands in an upright position. Or else is slid from across the floor of a van or compartment and hits the far wall end on.
 
Ivan

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What I would like to see with many cases is more padding/protection above the top (tenon received) and the beneath the bottom (bis or sprain bell)

There is often plenty of padding laterally but very little in the places that are vulnerable ion the case is drooped and lands in an upright position. Or else is slid from across the floor of a van or compartment and hits the far wall end on.
Could too tight tolerances limit the makes of sax that would fit a generic case?
 
Jazzaferri

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What a great case will do is slow down decelerations to a harmless level as well as protect from impacts. Very few cases meet these parameters. Layers of hard medium and soft density foams properly designed along with a string rigid out shell would be the ticket. If I were still travelling by air with instruments for work I would make my own cases using one of these types Would always have to be checked. Martin Taylor swears by his and he is always on the go.

R Series 4024-18 Waterproof Case (with layered foam) | SKB Music / ProAV

@Ivan it varies from airline to airline and it has become more prevalent recently as cost pressures and tight schedules put pressure on ground handling staff

I haven't seen any reliable statistics but over 20 years of flying around airports I would say that every major airport has several of these a day. Mostly not instruments as they are a very small percentage of handled bags.
 
Phil

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I would not like checking my horn for sure. Baggage handlers may be the least of the problem. the conveyor belt system in airports literally drops your bags repeatedly...at best from a short distance while zooming through the airport.. From viewing these videos it would be ideal for the instrument case itself, to have a padded outer case to reduce shock.. Much in the way that a box in a box system works well for shipping. Of course there are size limitations as well...so it would have to be somewhat high tech to do the job.
 
Jazzaferri

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Nope, the one I listed would fit an alto and tenor with lots of padding and it just makes under the dimensions for regular checke baggage.

Their soft cases are really nice but if they dont provide enough deceleration protection IMO They might be good for surviving the beltways but not the long distance throw of a baggage handler. The United breaks guitars Cdn musician watched as they overthrew his guitar maybe three times. part videod.
 
Ivan

Ivan

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I'm with @Jazzaferri on this one though at 30kg and >£900 that particular box is ultra ultra overkill

I like the look of MAX750H280 - Trifibre which will cushion a tenor beautifully and may even take sop + alto with some creative placement
 

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