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Does anyone Understand Brexit Rules

Ballymenaboy

Member
Messages
239
Location
Ballymena.Co.Antrim
It grieves me greatly that as a citizen of UK abd due to the ineptness of the Brexit withdrawl term negotiations I an still bound bu EU regulations.This appalling situation has led to many UK mainland suppliers refusing to sell product to N.Ireland now due to onerous and time consuming customs documentation and examination of cargo.
To answer the original question Iwould say that it is slowly now dawning how bad a deal the UK government has negotiated for and got for us all.
 

Dibbs

Member
Messages
740
We have just ordered two chairs from a UK furniture shop that sells posh Danish furniture. The ones we ordered have to be sent specially from Denmark. The shop is charging us an extra £80 "Service BREXIT Fee" to cover the extra admin costs.
That's certainly a company that knows how turn Brexit to their advantage.
 

griff136

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,053
Location
I live in Exmouth Devon.
I just want to understand. Its a done deal and Im not British so I dont get a vote.

As I understand it the HMRC wants me to pay 200 a year for the priveledge of working for them at no salary dealing with customs on the packages they dont want to hire someone to process. Does that sound about right?

Since my mouthpieces are than that amount I dont exactly know what happens or if I need a VAT number.

Regardless of political leanings I feel sorry for players in GB. Gear just got REAL expensive.
Phil, the French and UK VAT rates are the same at 20%, as goods sold in the EU over £135 do not have vat applied form the country of sale, they have it applied in the UK so the only difference customers in the UK should see from buying from France is the couriers "bonding fee" in the UK of £8 to£11. Some eu companies have however added a Brexit fee on top to cover the extra costs of filling in forms and adjusting to the new system.

I mostly order my repair materials From Italy. If I order goods with a total value above £200 from Italy or any other eu country with a higher VAT rate of 20% I'd actually be saving money.
 
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griff136

Well-Known Member
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1,053
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I live in Exmouth Devon.
IMHO the UK is stuffed (on this issue). For whatever reason, there are many postm office counters in Norway, often co-located in supermarkets, so it's very usual and not to hard to get a pickup notice for Tax (and large packages) - In the UK PO counters have been "rationalised"...

I've no idea how they'll square that circle.
In the UK customs forms can be filled out online, there are plenty of post offices in shops, supermarkets, pubs even. The Royal Mail and other postal services such as DPD and UPS even collect your items form your house, so I can't see how the UK is stuffed in that respect.
As for importing goods from the EU, I regulary order sax repair materials from the EU - there will be no change financially or otherwise for me unless I order goods worth more than the value of £135.
Goods over the value of £135 should not have the VAT of the eu country applied and instead should have the UK Import duty applied this end - for some eu countries their vat is as high as 27% and some are as low as 17% . I mostly order from Italy where their VAT is 22% So in effect I should be saving 2% in VAT but paying the bonding fee from the courier of around £8 - 11.
If I order goods with a total value above £200 from Italy or any other eu country with a higher VAT rate of 20% I'd actually be saving money and the VAT goes to the UK and not the EU. And if IM ordering From France where the rate is 20% I should lie only paying the £8 to £11 bonding fee, unless the company I am buying from slaps on a "brexit fee" which then IMO they're cutting their noses off to spite their faces.
 

mizmar

Member
Messages
574
Location
Trondheim, Norway
In the UK customs forms can be filled out online, there are plenty of post offices in shops, supermarkets, pubs even. The Royal Mail and other postal services such as DPD and UPS even collect your items form your house, so I can't see how the UK is stuffed in that respect.
As for importing goods from the EU, I regulary order sax repair materials from the EU - there will be no change financially or otherwise for me unless I order goods worth more than the value of £135.
Goods over the value of £135 should not have the VAT of the eu country applied and instead should have the UK Import duty applied this end - for some eu countries their vat is as high as 27% and some are as low as 17% . I mostly order from Italy where their VAT is 22% So in effect I should be saving 2% in VAT but paying the bonding fee from the courier of around £8 - 11.
If I order goods with a total value above £200 from Italy or any other eu country with a higher VAT rate of 20% I'd actually be saving money and the VAT goes to the UK and not the EU. And if IM ordering From France where the rate is 20% I should lie only paying the £8 to £11 bonding fee, unless the company I am buying from slaps on a "brexit fee" which then IMO they're cutting their noses off to spite their faces.
Nice. You should get a job with the public information ministry.
Can you do one on 5 a day fruit and veggies?
 

Hankenstine

Member
Messages
97
Location
UK
No customs fees on higher value purchases?

Correct me if I'm wrong but I think with regards buying, for example, a used saxophone on ebay there is customs duty and VAT (20%) on all items imported into the UK from Europe where as previously there was no VAT charge. So because of Brexit everything is 20% more expensive.

Higher value goods are processed/charged similarly to how they where previously if you imported from outside the EU i.e. parcel force sends you a letter requesting payment before they'll deliver the item etc... Lower priced items (under £135) are done differently it seems?
 
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Phil

Senior Member
Commercial Supporter
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1,025
Location
France
Yes Hank exactly. Now you get to pay 20 percent (at least) more for items from items that are pretty much anywhere outside the UK.

If items are less than 135 the seller has to collect the fee and work for free for the British government...plus pay a yearly fee to do business in the UK for a VAT number.
Basically Brexit assumes that overnight the UK will become totally self sufficient and keep wealth in the country. Obvioiusy, this is not going to happen. Meanwhile, the average Joe gets to pay more for goods and many goods are no longer avaliable because many vendors refuse to comply with becoming unpaid agents for the British governemnt.

It does not effect me since the items I sell are over 135 (so its handled the old way of import). If I sold items under that price I would post "Sorry UK, I cant sell to you" on my web page.
Again, I dont want to get political because Im not from the UK and I dont care why the people voted for brexit. I only know from a commerce side of things that its likely to be a disaster for citizens and a lot of businesses.

...but again, no one asked me and its not my business.
 

Pete Thomas

Well-Known Member
Commercial Supporter
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15,011
Location
St. Mary's
So because of Brexit everything is 20% more expensive.
No it is more or less the same on business to customer sales. Within the EU companies charge VAT to the customer of whatever EU country. For exports outside EU they don't.

So before brexit if you bought something from (e.g.) Thomann they would charge VAT. Now they don't but it's added at the border. (although it seems companies can make an arrangement to charg it at source as do SYOS instead of you having to pay at UK cusoms which can incur a handling fee.

I have edited your post due to political references. We don't want to get into disparaing either politicians or voters - the thread will just disintegrate.
 

Hankenstine

Member
Messages
97
Location
UK
No it is more or less the same on business to customer sales. Within the EU companies charge VAT to the customer of whatever EU country. For exports outside EU they don't.
All I know is that if I want to buy a mouthpiece or sax from ebay or facebook market place and the seller is in the EU it is now 20% more expensive than it used to be. I'm not talking about buying brand new items.
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Café Supporter
Messages
5,049
Location
Surrey, UK
No it is more or less the same on business to customer sales. Within the EU companies charge VAT to the customer of whatever EU country. For exports outside EU they don't.

But as I understand it, for private sales, including those via eBay for example, an additional 20% VAT is charged and customs duty and handling charges.

Rhys
 

Phil

Senior Member
Commercial Supporter
Messages
1,025
Location
France
Basically, if its imported to the UK from anywhere that is not the UK 20 percent is added. When it was part of Europe you could import at no additional fee...ebay or not.

I cant imagine a people volunteering for such a status but I guess divorce is expensive. Only the lawyers win.
 

stitch

Member
Messages
616
Location
Nottingham, UK
No customs fees on higher value purchases?
My initial query re customs fees was directed specifically at @griff136, who was suggesting that he could potentially save money because of disparity in VAT levels.
I think we've already sufficiently hashed out the issues concerning buying and selling other items, and it probably doesn't need revisiting.
 

Pete Thomas

Well-Known Member
Commercial Supporter
Messages
15,011
Location
St. Mary's
But as I understand it, for private sales, including those via eBay for example, an additional 20% VAT is charged and customs duty and handling charges.
That’s right, private imports are now just like from anywhere, e.g. US Australia Antarctica etc.
 

jbtsax

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Café Supporter
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8,587
Location
Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
As someone who has lived in the US his entire life, I have no knowledge of VAT or the system of taxation in the UK. I suppose the only thing comparable to the VAT that I have is the state sales tax I pay on most purchased items. It varies by county, but where I live 6.75% is added to goods that I purchase. As a repair shop owner I am required to add 6.75% to every customer charge, collect that amount and pay the accumulated amount to the state quarterly.

Having said that, I am curious as to how the VAT money is spent in the UK? What services, if any, are funded by that source of income?
 

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