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Beautiful and/or Beastly Baritone Saxophone

squeak

Member
Messages
299
Of the B flat horns, which would you favour?

You talk about a high baffle, buzzy sound, so I assume you're talking about the mouthpieces that are matched to the instruments. I wonder whether this what would be thought of as the modern sound, and thus required in some areas of the industry. I also wonder if, as you might be intimating, a different mouthpiece and style of playing is possible on the low A's that would bring them more in to line with the B flats.

Dave
After looking unsuccessfully for a Bb MKVI bari locally, I took a chance and purchased the Thomann Low Jazz about a year ago. The horn needed a trip to the tech for an issue that Thomann should have arranged for a didn't, but otherwise, I have been very pleased with it. It is of solid build, easy to handle, and plays really well with the exception of a somewhat flat high E, which is not uncommon on modern baritone. As far as the construction goes, there is no need to take my word, as Stephen Howard has reviewed the horn here.

I completely agree with you that the matching of high baffle mouthpiece to a low A baritone seems to be a fashion and possibly even requirement, although this would be something to ask a professional about. It also works great in many contexts, as for instance Amy Winehouse. No doubt that lower baffle, bigger chamber mouthpieces and technique can bring out a much warmer sound in a low A horn, and some clips above demonstrate this. Whether a blind test would shown a difference to an equivalent low Bb sax, is something I don't know but it is different body tubes.

BTW, best of luck finding a horn that is right for you!
 

Dave Hep

New Member
Messages
27
Locality
UK
After looking unsuccessfully for a Bb MKVI bari locally, I took a chance and purchased the Thomann Low Jazz about a year ago. The horn needed a trip to the tech for an issue that Thomann should have arranged for a didn't, but otherwise, I have been very pleased with it. It is of solid build, easy to handle, and plays really well with the exception of a somewhat flat high E, which is not uncommon on modern baritone. As far as the construction goes, there is no need to take my word, as Stephen Howard has reviewed the horn here.

I completely agree with you that the matching of high baffle mouthpiece to a low A baritone seems to be a fashion and possibly even requirement, although this would be something to ask a professional about. It also works great in many contexts, as for instance Amy Winehouse. No doubt that lower baffle, bigger chamber mouthpieces and technique can bring out a much warmer sound in a low A horn, and some clips above demonstrate this. Whether a blind test would shown a difference to an equivalent low Bb sax, is something I don't know but it is different body tubes.

BTW, best of luck finding a horn that is right for you!
Thanks Squeak, and apologies; I've just realised that you answered the question about the horn in my Doorbell post.
 

squeak

Member
Messages
299
Thank you for bringing this to my attention. That Bach piece fits the baritone sax quite well. His legato tonguing is "sublime". The great advantage string players have over players of wind instruments and vocalists is that producing a tone on a stringed instrument does not require taking a breath.
Most welcome. Henk van Twillert has issued a double CD with all six cello suites for baritone saxophone that is one of my dessert island albums.
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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Minster On Sea
Thank you for bringing this to my attention. That Bach piece fits the baritone sax quite well. His legato tonguing is "sublime". The great advantage string players have over players of wind instruments and vocalists is that producing a tone on a stringed instrument does not require taking a breath.
I play this quite a lot. When I can't think of anything else I fancy playing I drag out Suite No. 1 and honk my way through it. The last bit of the Prelude is a piggy-wig on soprano. It's probably the hardest bit in the whole suite to sound convincing.
You won't be seeing my attempts on Youtube. :rolleyes: :D
 

jbtsax

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Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
I play this quite a lot. When I can't think of anything else I fancy playing I drag out Suite No. 1 and honk my way through it. The last bit of the Prelude is a piggy-wig on soprano. It's probably the hardest bit in the whole suite to sound convincing.
You won't be seeing my attempts on Youtube. :rolleyes: :D
I developed a healthy respect for Bach's music when I played the A minor violin concerto on alto saxophone in a sophomore college recital. I remember finding where to breathe was a real challenge.
 

rhysonsax

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Surrey, UK
I enjoy the albums by Raaf Hekkema who plays his own arrangements of Bach Cello Suites and Partitas on historic saxophones of various sizes and makes.


The CDs are very well recorded, but quite disconcerting to listen to on headphones as I do - there is appreciable key noise and the sound of Raaf breathing, both of which seem to come from the middle of the listener's head.

Rhys
 

Ivan

Undecided
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there is appreciable key noise and the sound of Raaf breathing
Comes with classical baritone territory in the preceding recordings in this thread too... Maybe the trick is to regard those added sounds a part of the performance
 

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