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SYOS

Beautiful and/or Beastly Baritone Saxophone

squeak

Member
Messages
83
I'm rather find of
I bumped into Dana Colley one day while he was busy painting the hallway outside my then condo one day. Sure seemed like a nice and low key individual. This was after Mark Sandman's death. Life as a professional musician is hard save for a very few.

The repertoire of Morphine is not what I listen much to, but I love how the bari sax is used. I wish others would too, but it probably a hard act to follow.
 

Dave Hep

New Member
Messages
24
I know. Addition off the low A dealt a blow (sorry) to the baritone sax as solo instrument, but this is not to say that it doesn't work great in a moderns setting. I love Mulligan in particular and also recently discovered Bob Gordon. For this thread, I thought it was nice with living baritone saxophonists. Here is another example of Frederik Lundin in a quartet. He is a fantastic saxophonist and composer, but mainly plays tenor. However, I think he sounds even better on baritone.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhMJv8Byimk

Hi Squeak,

I've just started learning about the Bari and looking to get one as soon as funds allow. I was interest in you assertion that "Addition off the low A dealt a blow (sorry) to the baritone sax as solo instrument ...", and wondered why you think that; I'm not disagreeing, just interested in your thoughts.

Dave
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
4,586
Hi Squeak,

I've just started learning about the Bari and looking to get one as soon as funds allow. I was interest in you assertion that "Addition off the low A dealt a blow (sorry) to the baritone sax as solo instrument ...", and wondered why you think that; I'm not disagreeing, just interested in your thoughts.

Dave

I am disagreeing.

There are still lots of baritone soloists, some play low Bb and others play low A horns. There weren't many bari soloists back in the 30s and 40s before low A horns came in.

Rhys
 

squeak

Member
Messages
83
Hi Squeak,

I've just started learning about the Bari and looking to get one as soon as funds allow. I was interest in you assertion that "Addition off the low A dealt a blow (sorry) to the baritone sax as solo instrument ...", and wondered why you think that; I'm not disagreeing, just interested in your thoughts.

Dave
I am an amateur and it is just my personal opinion. However, there does appear to be this notion that the low A is a must to play jazz in big bands, funk and rock. In effect, this is mostly how the bari sax is used and often combined with a high baffle buzzy sound that I don't care too much for. Also, I have tried maybe 7-8 different makes of baritone saxes and preferred the sound in the low end of the Bb horns. The Smulyan/Di Blasio clip above is actually not a bad example. It could be bias or coincidence, but this, along with listening, is what my perspective is based upon. This not to say that plenty of players don't sound wonderful on low A horns. It may well be that a low A horn will work best for you and surely open more doors for playing in bands.
 

Dave Hep

New Member
Messages
24
I am disagreeing.

There are still lots of baritone soloists, some play low Bb and others play low A horns. There weren't many bari soloists back in the 30s and 40s before low A horns came in.

Rhys
Thanks for your input Rhys.

I don't know how long low A Baris have been around, but you seem to be saying that there have been more Bari soloists since that happened. I'd always assumed that the lower number was just down to fewer people playing the instrument, so what you say is interesting.

Dave
 

Dave Hep

New Member
Messages
24
I am an amateur and it is just my personal opinion. However, there does appear to be this notion that the low A is a must to play jazz in big bands, funk and rock. In effect, this is mostly how the bari sax is used and often combined with a high baffle buzzy sound that I don't care too much for. Also, I have tried maybe 7-8 different makes of baritone saxes and preferred the sound in the low end of the Bb horns. The Smulyan/Di Blasio clip above is actually not a bad example. It could be bias or coincidence, but this, along with listening, is what my perspective is based upon. This not to say that plenty of players don't sound wonderful on low A horns. It may well be that a low A horn will work best for you and surely open more doors for playing in bands.
Thanks for the reply Squeak; as far as I' concerned your opinion is as valued as anyone else's, so your comments are very welcome.

I have no idea what will suit me at the moment, and I'm trying to work out how I'm going to find out in the current situation; prior to Covid-19, I' d have gone along to the local emporium and had a blow of two or three and found out, but I can' t see that happening any time soon, so I'll almost be buying blind.

Of the B flat horns, which would you favour?

You talk about a high baffle, buzzy sound, so I assume you're talking about the mouthpieces that are matched to the instruments. I wonder whether this what would be thought of as the modern sound, and thus required in some areas of the industry. I also wonder if, as you might be intimating, a different mouthpiece and style of playing is possible on the low A's that would bring them more in to line with the B flats.

Dave
 
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