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Saxophones tape instead of cork on neck

T

turf3

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I've been using electrical tape for 50 years now and I can't say I've ever had it NOT bleed adhesive sooner or later. There's a reason why quality electrical repairs are done with heat shrink tubing instead.
 
ESJohn

ESJohn

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the cork on the neck split and could,nt be repaired
I was wondering why a repair (or replacement) couldn't be done. Do you mean at the moment the issue developed or is there no hope of ever replacing the cork? My guess is that electrical tape's linear elasticity would become a problem, as well as the adhesive bleeding. There are silicone tapes available at hardware stores (see features below), but I would guess that cork would be best. I'm speaking as one who has never encountered that problem or experimented, so I am happy to hear everyone's comments on the subject.
  1. Five Benefits of Silicone Tape
    • Moisture. Moisture will ruin the seal of most tapes. Silicone tape will resist moisture, so it will keep providing insulation even when it gets wet.
    • Bonding. Most types of insulating tape are very sticky and will bond to anything. Silicone tape will not bond to any surface, but it will fuse to itself instantly.
    • Flexibility. Another benefit of silicone tape is that it is very flexible. It easily stretches, so it will conform to almost any odd shape that it’s used on.
    • Temperature. Many kinds of tape will not stand up well to different temperatures. Silicone tape can be used in a wide array of temperatures.
    • Durability. One of the final benefits of silicone tape is its durability. ...
    Reference: www.stepbystep.com/Five-Benefits-of-Silicone-Tape-170362/
 
Dr G

Dr G

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A good cork will be shaped to a cylinder, vs a cone as results from wrapping tape on the neck tube. This allows one to easily adjust the mouthpiece to the proper position rather than fight increasing resistance to shove it further on the neck.
 
thomsax

thomsax

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A good cork will be shaped to a cylinder, vs a cone as results from wrapping tape on the neck tube. This allows one to easily adjust the mouthpiece to the proper position rather than fight increasing resistance to shove it further on the neck.
At last. For me it's tube corks and shellack. Mouthpieces, reeds, ligatures, necks ...... are important. If you have problems up there, your problems will be even bigger down the tube. It's like a car. If don't have a good injection/carbureter your car will lose power. I think it's the same with a saxophone.
 
thomsax

thomsax

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It's often the mouthpiece that damaged the cork. The rims/edge of the bore on metal mouthpieces can be sharp. My Rovner mouthpices have nice rounded edges but BL, Dukoff ,,, can be edgy. I made the edge less sharp on my baritone mouthpice.
 
SaxBoss

SaxBoss

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Australia
To the OP, have you ever actually had a go at trying to replace the cork on a sax neck with the correct cork? It's fairly simple and in expensive repair.

What's your objection to using cork ?
 

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