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Replacing the cork on a sax neck

ProfJames

Elementary member
Messages
12,069
Location
Berkshire, UK
Hi All

How long does it take to replace the cork on a neck? Also how much should this type of repair cost? Anything else I should know?
 

QWales

Senior Member
Messages
740
Location
S. Wales, UK
OK this is not a difficult job at all: Go to Ebay and search for Cork. There's a guy from Canada on there who sells the full kit with glue, a cutting blade, a bit of wet & dry, instructions and the cork which is chamfered at both ends and with 3 big X's on one edge to show you which end is which and the whole thing is only around £7 delivered. I would say it shouldn't take you much longer than an hour the first time you do it. Hope this helps.
 

ProfJames

Elementary member
Messages
12,069
Location
Berkshire, UK
Thank youto everyone who took the time to respond. Much appreciated as ever. Now can you help with this question!? What is a stencilled sax?
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,066
Location
Burnley bb9 9dn
A factory producing saxophones for a retailer under the retailers badge may produce the exact same saxophone under a different badge or their own badge. This saxophone with a different badge would be a stencil of the first.


Some quality or valued models were produced by factories other than the badge. If a cheaper less valued model is made in the same factory under a different badge yet is exactly the same design, quality and materials then it becomes a desired stencil.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Café Supporter
Messages
21,912
Location
Just north of Munich
comes from the concept that the difference was the stencil used to engrave the name on the sax.

Some stencils were made by one factory for another as well - e.g. Amatia made some saxes for Keilwerth, not that the Keilwerth owners like to admit it. And this is the case with Beaugnier - they made some saxes for Dolnet and other french manufacturers as well as retailers.
 

ProfJames

Elementary member
Messages
12,069
Location
Berkshire, UK
Hi Guys

Cleaning a sax. What is the best thing to use to maintain/clean/polish a standard sax? I also have an antique finish alto, is there anything I need to know before attempting to clean it?
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,678
Location
Betelgeuse
If you use one of these

http://www.windplus.co.uk/supplies/sax_neck_corks.html

It takes slightly longer than the glue takes to dry and is simple to do. It's something every player should be able to do themselves.

I order them in multiples. The first one you do will probably break the cork.

Ho Colin, these look great - I've always done it the old fashioned way with a flat bit of cork.

One question - have you tried them with a neck that has a riase brass ring around the point end. Looks like it would be a struggle to get one of these over.

Jon
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,066
Location
Burnley bb9 9dn
The cork has a little give in it. I slide the tube on while the glue is still wet and this seems to help lubricate it. On tenor and alto the crook is tapered so you need a way of holding it on till it's dry or it will slide off.

The tubes are quite thick and are useful if you have a mouthpiece with a large bore.
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Café Supporter
Messages
8,520
Location
Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
Sorry Colin. Pre-made corks are for wimps. "Real men" use razor blades to cut and trim sheet cork to fit. :D

fingerswithbandaids.jpg
 

navarro

Senior Member
Messages
863
Location
LONDON
If you use one of these

http://www.windplus.co.uk/supplies/sax_neck_corks.html

It takes slightly longer than the glue takes to dry and is simple to do. It's something every player should be able to do themselves.

I order them in multiples. The first one you do will probably break the cork.
Thanks Bear wish I had known that just spent £20.00 having my alto recorked. Have to admit they did a good job. Im a bit wary about DIY I`m not much good at cutting in straight lines. Info taken on board. Regds N.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,066
Location
Burnley bb9 9dn
A craft knife and a ruler to guide it will cut straight. Use scissors if a craft knife is too much to control. Thin cork cuts easily with them. Mark it out and follow the lines.

If you mess it up the worst thing that can happen is that you have to take it to the shop and there's a few bits of cork in the bin.
 

frankiejb59

Member
Messages
39
Location
uk
Hi All

How long does it take to replace the cork on a neck? Also how much should this type of repair cost? Anything else I should know?
I just did mine this afternoon. Took about half an hour. buy some decent cork and adhesive cement from ebay or whatever. you'l need a decent craft knife or scalpel and sanpaper and of course, a flat surface :)
 

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