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SYOS

Tale of Three Saxes

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Admitone

Admitone

Member
Messages
108
Does this mean they all literally put a leak light in the horn, checked for pad leaks, checked for regulation leaks,
I fashioned a light and found a small leak around the top rim of the low B key. The B seems to close just a tad after the Bb key, and closes fully only after I press fairly hard on Bb.

I don't see an adjustment for the relationship between the two keys, so I guess it's off to find yet another tech.
 
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Admitone

Admitone

Member
Messages
108
Buy a bass and hide the others in the bell.
My wife is in a new Aretha Franklin movie, "Respect". She was telling me about the three saxes in the band: alto, tenor, bari. I told her I needed at least one of each both at our apartment in the city, and cabin in the mountains because our Bolt EV is too small to carry them all back and forth.

So I'm now up to six (not counting secret hiding places)!
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
Subscriber
Messages
8,702
I fashioned a light and found a small leak around the top rim of the low B key. The B seems to close just a tad after the Bb key, and closes fully only after I press fairly hard on Bb.

I don't see an adjustment for the relationship between the two keys, so I guess it's off to find yet another tech.
I think you can adjust the regulation for that by bending the little tab in the pinky cluster where the Bb moves the B.
(I'll wait now for @jbtsax to tell me I'm wrong).
 
Last edited:

Saxlicker

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,902
The problem with mark VI's are with its mythical status, if you have a great one then that's fine but there were and still are a lot of bad ones about, i owned a mark VI for about 20 years and it was handpicked from about 12 VI's, but I still parted with it because I found 2 Taiwan built horns that played and sounded as good.
I think I know what you are saying and I did try to resist posting with my 2 penneth and derailing the thread a bit with more MKVI talk but.....
For me the problem is not some good and a lot of bad MKVI's it's peoples expectation of the model because of all the stories out there.
Pulling together a complete package in a saxophone was the way Selmer were headed and making distinct progress from the BA onwards. With the birth of the MKVI it had just all come together for the musicians at the time. The ergonomics, the quality, reliability and even though intonation variance, individual quirkyness of tonal tendencies were still part of the consideration when matching mouthpieces to the horn, the MKVI had given so much more than before and it clearly was able to cope with a transition from acoustic settings to the demanding amplified rock n roll.
All that stuff makes it a master piece, a legend, a prize piece of saxophone history.
Really the focus of its qualities were far more talked about in Tenor and Alto but I guess thats always the score given they remain the 2 most popular pitched variants.
It' run from the late 50's to mid 70's speaks for it's self with Selmer never needing to replace this winning formula even though the model was tweaked along the way until finally the tooling condition and maybe some manufacturing techniques, new competition meant the MKVII was born. The MKVII is generally accepted as a decent enough horn these days but as a successor to the MKVI, nothing really stood a chance.
These days, many other saxophones do enough to make a MKVI seem like just another horn in many ways. We've also reached a point where other vintage horns are sort after because they are vintage with vintage appeal and even the other big guns f the time like a a conn 10m, a king super 20, a Buescher top hat and cane were all lacking 'completeness' in comparison back in the day for most musicians. But none of that matters any more. These days vintage saxes command a price to be part of the club that recognises theier individual beauty and qualities and you're either interested in that or you're not.
All these horns have a place and the MKVI was generally the king of them all you can't take that away.
Personally vintage horns fuel my interest,I love the nostalgia and the MKVI riegns. I have mordern horns too but I don't love them in the same way, they aren't better quality, they don't sound better, they aren't easier to play so my MKVI's should outlive me and I'd love them to eventually end up in the hands of future generations who feel the same way.
An austin metro :D doesn't have the highly respected place in history that a MK I ford escort does......so many reasons yet put the 2 side by side in 1989 and the metro would have been a far better choice for a long journey. This cannot be said to the same degree of a new horn verses a good conditon MKVI...
Phew....that was a long one!!
 
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Nick Wyver

noisy
Subscriber
Messages
5,861
The MKVII is generally accepted as a decent enough horn these days but as a successor to the MKVI, nothing really stood a chance.
In my somewhat limited experience of playing both I prefer VIIs to VIs. But then I'm not generally a fan of vintage saxes.
 

Saxlicker

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,902
In my somewhat limited experience of playing both I prefer VIIs to VIs. But then I'm not generally a fan of vintage saxes.
Yes, I have owned 1 and played 2 MKVII's and quite different to my MKVI's but I thought they were great.
Shame I needed to sell at the time. I do regret it.
 

jazzdoh

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,143
I think I know what you are saying and I did try to resist posting with my 2 penneth and derailing the thread a bit with more MKVI talk but.....
For me the problem is not some good and a lot of bad MKVI's it's peoples expectation of the model because of all the stories out there.
Pulling together a complete package in a saxophone was the way Selmer were headed and making distinct progress from the BA onwards. With the birth of the MKVI it had just all come together for the musicians at the time. The ergonomics, the quality, reliability and even though intonation variance, individual quirkyness of tonal tendencies were still part of the consideration when matching mouthpieces to the horn, the MKVI had given so much more than before and it clearly was able to cope with a transition from acoustic settings to the demanding amplified rock n roll.
All that stuff makes it a master piece, a legend, a prize piece of saxophone history.
Really the focus of its qualities were far more talked about in Tenor and Alto but I guess thats always the score given they remain the 2 most popular pitched variants.
It' run from the late 50's to mid 70's speaks for it's self with Selmer never needing to replace this winning formula even though the model was tweaked along the way until finally the tooling condition and maybe some manufacturing techniques, new competition meant the MKVII was born. The MKVII is generally accepted as a decent enough horn these days but as a successor to the MKVI, nothing really stood a chance.
These days, many other saxophones do enough to make a MKVI seem like just another horn in many ways. We've also reached a point where other vintage horns are sort after because they are vintage with vintage appeal and even the other big guns f the time like a a conn 10m, a king super 20, a Buescher top hat and cane were all lacking 'completeness' in comparison back in the day for most musicians. But none of that matters any more. These days vintage saxes command a price to be part of the club that recognises theier individual beauty and qualities and you're either interested in that or you're not.
All these horns have a place and the MKVI was generally the king of them all you can't take that away.
Personally vintage horns fuel my interest,I love the nostalgia and the MKVI riegns. I have mordern horns too but I don't love them in the same way, they aren't better quality, they don't sound better, they aren't easier to play so my MKVI's should outlive me and I'd love them to eventually end up in the hands of future generations who feel the same way.
An austin metro :D doesn't have the highly respected place in history that a MK I ford escort does......so many reasons yet put the 2 side by side in 1989 and the metro would have been a far better choice for a long journey. This cannot be said to the same degree of a new horn verses a good conditon MKVI...
Phew....that was a long one!!
First of all sorry for the off topic post.
I do agree with what you say above, the VI was/is a special horn and will always have a place in saxophone history, but I think because it was hand built there were differences in quality and sound, I tried a lot when I bought mine and have tried various other players VI's over the years some horns were so resistant the difference was so marked you would have thought you were playing a different brand.
For me I had an issue taking my VI out to some of the gigs I did, not wanting it to get damaged and the 2 Taiwan horns I own now "Custom Raw and Viking Valkyre" are excellent players, i didn't intend selling the Selmer but had a great offer from another player and haven't regretted it yet.
 
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Admitone

Admitone

Member
Messages
108
These days, many other saxophones do enough to make a MKVI seem like just another horn in many ways.
With three altos, I decided to sell my SA80II, and took it to a local dealer who is also a great player. He played it and said something along the lines of - great horn, as good as a Mark VI, are you sure you want to sell it? I was very surprised, particularly as he risked a nice commission, and remembering the remark that no one sells a good Selmer, decided it best to keep it.
All that stuff makes it a master piece, a legend, a prize piece of saxophone history.
And there's the rub. If a VI is just as good as a newer horn, why not play a piece of history?
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
Subscriber
Messages
1,322
And there's the rub. If a VI is just as good as a newer horn, why not play a piece of history?
I do play a piece of history. My Super 20 cost much less than a Mark VI, it is also just as good as a newer horn and I love it.
 
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Admitone

Admitone

Member
Messages
108
So I got the tenor. It's a brand new in a sealed box Selmer SA80 II. It's been sitting in the stock room of a NJ music store for 15 years, so I guess its old-new as opposed to old-used.

The price was right, but it will be interesting to see how it's held up over the years.

I have a couple of days to plan a stealth root (ok, route) to the basement closet.
 
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Admitone

Admitone

Member
Messages
108
I just got the Mark VI back from a tech, and the good news is that he found and fixed a low B leak.

The good news is that the repair definitely helped. The bad news is I can no longer decide which one I like best.
 
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