Should You Full Stop or Period or Neither?

MikeMorrell

Netherlands
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I recently (voluntarily) translated Dutch to English text for a (crowd-funded) photo-book about the experience of 'foot-soldiers' in the Napoleonic wars (including photos of recent 're-enactments'). Some of the Dutch texts quoted authentic 'letters home and their replies'. As a translator (even a voluntary one) I looked up equivalent 'letters home and replies' from British soldiers fighting (on opposite sides to the French). Around that time the 'educated classes' did indeed adhere to some kind of 'Standard English '(Grammar, Spelling, Punctuation etc.). But the common folk (foot soldiers, family and others) just wrote as best they (individually) could. Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation varied widely from person to person. Letters were written in the hope that the receiver could decipher what the writer meant.

I have no idea when the 'good old days' began. I suspect that it began earlier in the 'educated classes' than in the general population/.

Just a thought,

Mike


It is a shame that all this technical equipment we use has eclipsed the good old days, when a qill pen, ink, a sheet of paper could be used, with correct spelling, punctuation and grammer, to convey meaning and emotion
 

saxyjt

I have saxophone withdrawal symptoms
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France
Good question

Habit, probably

I want that comma above to imply a pause, so it is there. I want the preceding full stop to show this is a new sentence

But the start of this new paragraph indicates the last sentence above has finished, and I like the look of no period/stop at the end of the last sentence of a paragraph

If I write a letter, I use full stops in the conventional way. There are no rules

@Ivan you are a rebel

But at least you keep using paragraphs and that's good as those who don't in my opinion are not respectful of their readers.

Form matters to me as it can become difficult to understand a foreign language when it's neglected.
 

Halfers

Finger Flapper
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It is a shame that all this technical equipment we use has eclipsed the good old days, when a qill pen, ink, a sheet of paper could be used, with correct spelling, punctuation and grammer, to convey meaning and emotion
The art of penmanship (penpersonship?) letter writing and caligraphy etc is still very much alive (if one wishes it to be). Doesn't work too well for an open forum though! Lots of pass around time!!
 

spike

Old Indian
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Yes well, Quo Vardis? Another saturday night, where hithertoo art thou marching?
Also one might Arsk:
Are the musicians and troubadors of today adhering to the dotted quavers and minims and all such the multitude of musical punctuations in their renderings?
Are we not perhaps entering or have indeed entered and are experiencing an age of depravation, corruption and degeneration, a complete disregard for the norms, the rules of the road, of etiquette, of P's and Q's, of please and thankyou.
An age of "up yours guv'nor".
Seems like the answer is yes.
Right on lads there'll be no more full stops an' no more freakin' paragraphs on 'ere . . . . . . not even sentences
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
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...as the latter is the American term for the former correct English term.
(That should wind up the yanks).
If we are going to be pedantic it should also wind up the southerners.

Even more pedantry might point out that the word American might describe all languages and people from Canada right down to Tierra del Fuego.
 

tenorviol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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It is, but spelt and spelled are inter-changeable as the past of spell. Unless you are american when spelled is used, but not spelt.
Yes there are a number of verbs where the past participle can end in ‘t’ such as spelled/spelt and learned/learnt, dwelled/dwelt etc.
There are a few were the ..t ending is more common e.g. built not builded
 

Jazzaferri

Well-Known Member
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Victoria BC Canada
Sometimes I like to be classical and put my prose in grammatically correct form.

But in my heart......I love to improvise…….and sometimes...….miss pell stuff Evun,,,,,...
 
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