opinion on scale learning,

MandyH

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#21
I’ve just realised the scales that you have written aren’t “logical” for a beginner
I’d be more inclined to learn C major (no sharps or flats), followed by G major (one sharp) then maybe D major (2 sharps), or followed by F (1 flat) then Bb (2 flats)
 

chekre

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#22
I’ve just realised the scales that you have written aren’t “logical” for a beginner
I’d be more inclined to learn C major (no sharps or flats), followed by G major (one sharp) then maybe D major (2 sharps), or followed by F (1 flat) then Bb (2 flats)
well I have pretty much learned the ones on the chart maybe another week or two, then I was going to knock out the major and minor pentatonic on each....remarks?
 

Caz

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#23
The important things (imho) about scales that it shouldnt just be an excercise for your muscle memory or your sight reading ability.
Mix it up a bit - play C maj->C#->G maj -> Abmaj->Dmaj -> Eb etc.
Or
Ascend chromatically Cmaj->C#maj->Dmaj etc. Doing this (for me at least) off sets my muscle memory and commit this to some sort of active learning, where i have to think about a bit harder than just racing up and down the scale. This is prob not where you are at the moment, but this is something to consider in the future.
 

randulo

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#24
Before I got a teacher, my (bad!) approach was to start at C, and learn the major scales chromatically up, C, C#, etc. Each day I'd also try to play the chromatic scale from C to the highest F. (Is this C1 to F3?) I still practice the chromatic scale daily, pausing to work on problem areas, like around the break, and using the Bb key, etc. My RH little finger is weaker than the rest, so there's an area there in two octaves that needs to be worked on. I still follow the teacher's better cycle of fifths plan, because, as he said, "it gives context". He's right, what I was doing before, major scales up chromatically, gives no insight, which you need when your not just playing scales. Your fingers learn the scales, but this seems much less helpful if you want to play jazz. Cycle of fifths (or fourths) seems the best of all worlds.

Also, a way to better hear the diatonic modes: Play the C major scale up and down on one octave. Then play, starting at D to D octave and back down to D, then E up and down etc. This also gives a great workout but also makes you hear all the diatonic modes.
 

Jeanette

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#25
Also, a way to better hear the diatonic modes: Play the C major scale up and down on one octave. Then play, starting at D to D octave and back down to D, then E up and down etc. This also gives a great workout but also makes you hear all the diatonic modes.
That's one I do :)

JX
 

Jazzaferri

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#27
Here is one of my two warmup exercises that I developed on my ownsome. Probably somewhere someone else did it before me :thanks2:

C E G B A G F E D F A C B A G F E G B D C B A etc all the way up to Octave C Then starting up the Octave B G E C D E F G A F D B C D E F etc back down the scale. It is the 4 note diatonic chords with scalar in fills. I go counterclockwise through the circle of fifths so C F Bb Eb Ab Db(C#) Gb(F#) B E A D G the goal is to be able to do them clean. Work each one individually until you can co it changing articulations at will at eighths maybe 90 bpm Then start the next key.

The ultimate goal is to be able to do this exercise at eighths at 200 bpm. It does require in F#, G Ab and A either some rejigging or playing in altissimo. Each key is 16 bars x 12 keys = 192 bars At 120 bpm its about 6 and a half minutes.
 

chekre

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#31
Then when you get fed up with all these scales. Play Autumn Leaves in Concert Gm. Because it's Autumn ;)
lol, you know I actually like this learning process and repetition, maybe because I am a drummer also, but I should lear a few songs I will take a look!

t
That's one I do :)

JX
hank you I like!

Here is one of my two warmup exercises that I developed on my ownsome. Probably somewhere someone else did it before me :thanks2:

C E G B A G F E D F A C B A G F E G B D C B A etc all the way up to Octave C Then starting up the Octave B G E C D E F G A F D B C D E F etc back down the scale. It is the 4 note diatonic chords with scalar in fills. I go counterclockwise through the circle of fifths so C F Bb Eb Ab Db(C#) Gb(F#) B E A D G the goal is to be able to do them clean. Work each one individually until you can co it changing articulations at will at eighths maybe 90 bpm Then start the next key.

The ultimate goal is to be able to do this exercise at eighths at 200 bpm. It does require in F#, G Ab and A either some rejigging or playing in altissimo. Each key is 16 bars x 12 keys = 192 bars At 120 bpm its about 6 and a half minutes.
thx I am a bit away from all that lol but something to look forward to...
 
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chekre

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st louis
#32
The important things (imho) about scales that it shouldnt just be an excercise for your muscle memory or your sight reading ability.
Mix it up a bit - play C maj->C#->G maj -> Abmaj->Dmaj -> Eb etc.
Or
Ascend chromatically Cmaj->C#maj->Dmaj etc. Doing this (for me at least) off sets my muscle memory and commit this to some sort of active learning, where i have to think about a bit harder than just racing up and down the scale. This is prob not where you are at the moment, but this is something to consider in the future.
yes I think I am heading to the ascending chromatically path...thx...mike

I’ve just realised the scales that you have written aren’t “logical” for a beginner
I’d be more inclined to learn C major (no sharps or flats), followed by G major (one sharp) then maybe D major (2 sharps), or followed by F (1 flat) then Bb (2 flats)
I realize your correct now and am changing my charts I thinkI am going to Caz's advise....thx for your input ...mike
 

chekre

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#35
ok ..what is next .....not a bunch just a few more scales...this is what I know now after 2 months...
c chromatic of which i continue to practice in ascending order..
b flat
a
c
d
e
f
g
 

MandyH

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#36
Eb, Ab, Db (enharmonically C#)
B, F#

Then move on to harmonic minors of all scales, or Jazz melodic minors of all scales, depending on where you’d prefer to be - classical or Jazz?

And it’s worth trying Chromatic in descending order too.
 

chekre

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#39
Mandy..so would that be the major 12 keys then? also I am doing ascending and descending down to the next ascending than back up...make sense ..
also Thank you very much!!!
Has anyone opined on the easiest and the hardest major scales and why? At the moment, D major is the easiest. F# and B are the most chalenging, movements.
I love all the challenges that the sax has!!!
 

chekre

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st louis
#40
as I said in my bio I am now a 67 year old man as of 10/23 LOL and I can't wait to get home everyday to play and love the idea of tackling the challenges presented by the saxophone so my plan is unfolding thanks to a lot of help which is much appreciated ....so I am knocking out the major scales and am adding on Mandy's advice her suggestions of Keys at this point..and she also suggest then moving to minor harmonic scales or jazz minor...........ok I get that as a next move I could consider.... any opinions on pentatonic scales ?? they see to be in some popular teaching courses on line promising to make playing easier in one way or another.....??? thanks to all!!!
 
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