SYOS

Let's face it ! Mouthpiece Facing Curve

John Setchell

New Member
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29
(continued from above . . .)
This means that a pianissimo playing, the tone is basically a "sine wave" and as we crescendo, the harmonics rapidly catch up in amplitude to the fundamental till the reed starts to "beat" and then they grow in amplitude at the same rate. I have tried starting a note pianissimo and then making a gradual crescendo and can feel and hear where the reed starts to beat and the "transformation" of sound and feel takes place.

It makes sense that mouthpieces with wider tip openings require more air and input energy before the reed closes during each cycle of vibration and that this takes place at a louder dynamic level (greater amplitude) than it does on a mouthpiece with a smaller tip opening.
I’m only comfortable making sure the table’s clean & flat; the rails are equal; and the tip plate is same angle as top of the rails.
I’ve found a great empirical way of checking rails equal and tip angle is to use a single remote light source (the sun’s pretty single & remote!) and observe reflection on rails & tip as you tilt it. Sounds Heath-Robinson but is very revealing.
Here’s what I mean -
649876D6-9020-498E-B1A1-66E9BBBA87E8.jpeg
 

saxyjt

I have saxophone withdrawal symptoms
Subscriber
Messages
4,184
ive found a great empirical way of checking tails equal and tip angle is to use a single remote light source (the sun’s pretty single & remote!) and observe reflection on rails & tip as you tilt it. Sounds Heath-Robinson but is very revealing.
Here’s what I mean -

I like that! Unfortunately where I currently work, I have the opposite of single and remote and I have sets of 3 to 5 spots just above me and usually less than 4 feet away. It's really difficult to measure a curve of those dimensions. I plotted measurements I found on the internet and they show clearly that they are inaccurate as the curve is not smooth and progressive as it should be. It's only because of the lack of accuracy of the measures, especially as you get near the tip:
1603024391155.png

See the blue curve in the middle how it's uneven compared with the mathematical curves around it?

I can't imagine that it is a fair representation of reality.
 

John Setchell

New Member
Messages
29
I like that! Unfortunately where I currently work, I have the opposite of single and remote and I have sets of 3 to 5 spots just above me and usually less than 4 feet away. It's really difficult to measure a curve of those dimensions. I plotted measurements I found on the internet and they show clearly that they are inaccurate as the curve is not smooth and progressive as it should be. It's only because of the lack of accuracy of the measures, especially as you get near the tip:
View attachment 15846
See the blue curve in the middle how it's uneven compared with the mathematical curves around it?
I’m beginning to believe that the theoretical curve is less important than what actually WORKS for you. Nobody seems to know what the Perfect Curve is - perhaps it universally doesn't exist.
As long as the rails are equal and a progressive curve, it stands a chance IMO.
I believe that what happens at the tip IS important as it trains airflow to the reed which affects onset of note attack - Right? Slo-mo camera analysis shows it takes about 10 cycles for the reed & air column to become harmonic (bit like the human voice). Anyway it’s the tip angle being same as adjacent rails I’m working on, and the light-reflection thing reveals it beautifully.
 
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