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Bare brass temptation

jbtsax

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You could try just boiling the neck in a sauce pan to see if that works. You will probably need to replace the cork if you do this. I removed nitrocellulose lacquer from a bari sax using a propane hot oil "turkey fryer" shown below. The second photo shows how that type of lacquer comes off in sheets. Once the water gets to a boiling temperature, it doesn't take that long.

Misc 131.JPG
Selmer Bari remove lacquer.JPG
 

Taz

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I didn't want anything on the brass as I wanted it to tarnish naturally, which it has done and I love the way it looks and sounds.. Has it altered the way it plays? Yes, most definitely! Why and how? Probably because an ageing horn was stripped of all its mechanism, which was then cleaned, lubricated and then serviced meaning fewer leaks and a better and more responsive mechanism. She's lovely to play too!
 
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saxyjt

saxyjt

I have saxophone withdrawal symptoms
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I've used some acetone again today with some results, but not very efficient. I checked and apparently my wife no longer used the old fashioned varnish remover. She's got a very sensitive nose and she asked me if I had been using any solvant a couple of hours after I used acetone in the basement with closed doors! :w00t: I said, hmm, euh, me, no, not at all! Why would you think that? :rolleyes:

I take your point about the wax! And I'm starting to look for a proper chemical varnish remover...
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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Has it altered the way it plays? Yes, most definitely! Why and how? Probably because an ageing horn was stripped of all its mechanism, which was then cleaned, lubricated and then serviced meaning fewer leaks and a better and more responsive mechanism.
Ha.
Yes, very nicely put.
:cheers:
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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I've used some acetone again today with some results, but not very efficient. I checked and apparently my wife no longer used the old fashioned varnish remover. She's got a very sensitive nose and she asked me if I had been using any solvant a couple of hours after I used acetone in the basement with closed doors! :w00t: I said, hmm, euh, me, no, not at all! Why would you think that? :rolleyes:

I take your point about the wax! And I'm starting to look for a proper chemical varnish remover...
Good plan. Yes, acetone is just really a messy pain....
 

jbtsax

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I didn't want anything on the brass as I wanted it to tarnish naturally, which it has done and I love the way it looks and sounds.. Has it altered the way it plays? Yes, most definitely! Why and how? Probably because an ageing horn was stripped of all its mechanism, which was then cleaned, lubricated and then serviced meaning fewer leaks and a better and more responsive mechanism. She's lovely to play too!
This reminds me of the comment one time on Sax on the Web where a member wrote my Mark VI with most of its lacquer gone sounds much better than it did when the lacquer was new. That is because I have practiced on it every day for the past 20 years.
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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It's unlikely to work. I tried Renaissance wax, as used by the British Museum to preserve items. It didn't work.
Yup...another of those internet lore things. Renaissance has its purpose, but its purpose is not to prevent patina on bare brass instruments....
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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I have a bare brass tenor. I didn't like the brass smell on my hands, so I gave it a good polish with car wax. It doesn't stop it getting stained, but it doesn't smell any more.
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
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Playing a bare brass instrument with all that copper content will also be better for easing rheumatoid arthritis in the hands.
(Medical opinion says not but they probably don't believe in mysticism either.)
 

jbtsax

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The looks beautiful. The darker golden color is quite striking. I hope you used the acetone in a well ventilated area or outdoors. It can be unhealthy to inhale the fumes for any length of time.
 
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saxyjt

saxyjt

I have saxophone withdrawal symptoms
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I didn't take much precautions with acetone. What I read said it was not dangerous. I only had some obvious dryness of my thumb as it was in direct contact with the acetone soaked cotton. My last inspection with a proper light showed I still have some traces of lacquer in places, including inside the bell.

It's hard to decide when it is done done! :D
 
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