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SYOS

What kind of saxophonist do you most enjoy listening to?

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randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
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I've heard of two of those names and have yet to listen to two others.
 

s.mundi

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Like Hipparion I'm not specifically a sax listener and players who are generally in "show off" mode I find unmusical as they put themselves first/above the music.
It was a Sunday morning at a Pasadena Texas Baptist Church and we were XXXXXXXX XXX through our music. The vocalist was also the music director and made all the decisions. She chose to sing two songs acapella and I would accompany her. Her amazing voice and the saxophone filled the chapel. The natural reverb was lovely and it was the most powerful musical moment that I've ever experienced. The band was upset and got their feelings hurt because they had to sit out two songs. The director explained that were upset because they were accustomed to "90 minutes of look what I can do".
That was a funny statement.
 

Hipparion

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242
That was a funny statement.
Kind of ironic even. And yet... it may carry some truth as well. :)

That's completely immature as musicians.
Ahem... well, my current experience with a wind orchestra (with a few players coming from a classical music background) has taught me that egos can be quite strong with musicians... and I'd say it is even more so for musicians who are used to play the melodic part of pieces.
 
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randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
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egos can be quite strong with musicians... and I'd say it is even more so for musicians who are used to play the melodic part of pieces.
Indeed, but I've never known anyone who wouldn't jump at the chance to contemplate the audience for a song or two. Do you all know the jazz expression, "stroll"? Lead players would shout it to a pianist, it means "stop playing, don't play now". I played in a band where the violinist and drummer did long duets. The rest of us (bass, 2 guitars) loved it, we could scope out potential "company" for later.
 

jbtsax

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I agree 100%, but now we get into a rathole, when we define what is musical? We probably all agree on what you just said, but that one word has to be subjective.
To me it is like what a supreme court justice Potter Stewart said about "pornography"---"I can't define pornography, but I know it when I see it." I can't really define "musical", but I know it when I hear it, and I agree that it is a very personal and subjective thing. A performance that I consider musical speaks to me at some level in terms of conveying a feeling or emotion. It is like comparing a newspaper article with poetry. Both are made up of carefully selected words meant to convey ideas, but the poetry has a deeper meaning that can "touch" the reader inside in a way the text of the newspaper can rarely do.
 
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To me it is like what a supreme court justice Potter Stewart said about "pornography"---"I can't define pornography, but I know it when I see it." I can't really define "musical", but I know it when I hear it, and I agree that it is a very personal and subjective thing. A performance that I consider musical speaks to me at some level in terms of conveying a feeling or emotion. It is like comparing a newspaper article with poetry. Both are made up of carefully selected words meant to convey ideas, but the poetry has a deeper meaning that can "touch" the reader inside in a way the text of the newspaper can rarely do.
For me, this does it
View: https://youtu.be/cQ8EFubfLs8
 
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54
me too, but the album with strings changed this.
Are you talking about Imaginary Cities? or another album?

I love the solo starting around 4:40 on Lament on Imaginary Cities. In fact Apple Music tells me that was my most listened to track last year by some margin. Mostly that part on repeat.

I'm listening to it again now.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
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Are you talking about Imaginary Cities? or another album?

I love the solo starting around 4:40 on Lament on Imaginary Cities. In fact Apple Music tells me that was my most listened to track last year by some margin. Mostly that part on repeat.

I'm listening to it again now.
I think so, I’m terrible with album names. And track names. And most of the other stuff.
 

Jazzaferri

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2,595
This is a bit odd, but I don’t much listen to other Sax players any more, nor do I listen to the styles of music I play (except of course whilst playing) My current fave listening is Anoushka Shankar’s Traveller CD. Revisiting Debussy and Stravinsky a lot as well
 

Pete Effamy

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2,033
This is a bit odd, but I don’t much listen to other Sax players any more, nor do I listen to the styles of music I play (except of course whilst playing) My current fave listening is Anoushka Shankar’s Traveller CD. Revisiting Debussy and Stravinsky a lot as well
I have come back to Debussy. Always thought he didn’t stack up well to Ravel, but some very beautiful stuff.
 

CliveMA

Member
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170
On Soprano and alto, Walter Beasley's sweet, romantic sound, for example, "Killing me Softly". (I also love Bechet on "Summertime").

On Tenor, the luscious storytelling of the greats on ballads such as Dexter Gordon, Stan Getz, Zoot Sims. Modern examples, Joshua Redman on "Let it Be" and Bob Reynolds haunting "Unlucky".

I listen to a lot of smooth jazz sax music but I am not a fan of Jazz that buries the melody. I enjoy soulful storytelling but not technical excellence devoid of musicality.
 
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randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
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Joshua Redman on "Let it Be"
This is great tune to learn, it requires a level of expression, dynamics, imagination and reserve than many standard ballads because they often "hide" a lot of that on more complex harmonies and rhythms. To be able to make music with songs like this is a rare ability.
 

trimmy

One day i will...
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10,189
There are plenty of players that i enjoy listening too, I’m not a lover of solos that go on and on without any thought of the listener.
They have to have a great tone if they haven’t then i lose interest very very easily (20secs).
The players i listen to mostly are the sax greats we all know, in my case that’s Art Pepper, Hank Crawford and Richie Cole, my current listen on Alto is Tony Kofi and Camilla George.

I do like to find new players and have found Camila George, Nubya Garcia and Melissa Aldana great to listen too.

Camilla George wrote this for her dad.....
View: https://youtu.be/5vIO-RjAEMI
 
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randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
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There's absolutely no lack of very, very good saxophonists from every part of the world, so I have to find things (in my own head) that sound like me, not them. It's also why I refuse to get good at major seventh arpeggios.
 
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TimboSax

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I listen to the music. If the sax/guitar/keyboard/Peruvian nose flute fits the sound that I'm hearing then all's good.

That saying, when I started off as a kid I loved Zep, Purple etc, and so every song had to have a guitar solo. Took me a while to get away from that, to get to a stage where I play to the song, rather than the song plays to me. The BB King analogy is old hat, and he could do way more than one note, but the feel...

Same with the sax. If the sax fits the song, then I'm a fan. Early Floyd, love it.. "Will you", a total fav, Baker Street, makes the song. I like to hear the music rather than be battered by it.
 
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