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What are the elements of a voice on saxophone (or any non-electric instrument)?

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randulo

randulo

22 months since I began - 3.5% of my adult life
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I think the idea of what makes the essence of a voice in the larger sense, as I have explained is fascinating. As a student of the instrument, seeing what makes someone who they are, especially a unique genius like Sonny, is inspiring and elucidating.
 

rhysonsax

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I think that Grant Stewart has probably listened to a lot of Sonny Rollins and on first listening I mistook his playing for Rollins (my very favourite saxophone player)
By coincidence I was at my local monthly jazz club last night (an excellent 60th birthday gig for Alan Barnes featuring his +11 band playing tunes from his birth year of 1959). On the jazz club's programme for February 2020 I noticed:

"Sonny Rollins and the Modern Jazz Quartet" - Nat Steele Quintet featuring US Sax giant Grant Stewart.

I will definitely go along to that as Nat Steele is an excellent vibes player and I really like Sonny's album with the MJQ. It will also be interesting to hear Grant Stewart in the flesh.

Rhys
 
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randulo

randulo

22 months since I began - 3.5% of my adult life
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Since this thread woke up (Thanks, Rhys, you'll certainly report back after that concert?) I'd mention that I think knowing the elements mentioned above may be a part of having a "voice" in the first place. That, and how you've lived, as someone mentioned earlier. I wonder if McCoy Tyner has ever spoken about how he became so into quartal harmony? Because the spelling checker didn't like that word, I looked it up, and it is spelled correctly. Here's the definition given when I clicked "look up quartal":

In music, quartal harmony is the building of harmonic structures built from the intervals of the perfect fourth, the augmented fourth and the diminished fourth. For instance, a three-note quartal chord on C can be built by stacking perfect fourths, C–F–B♭.

For anyone who has never thought about this, any scale can be harmonized in fourths. For we can play one note at a time, that may translate into arpeggios. Here's how: Take C major on your sax. Play a C, F, Bb. You knew that! It's the first notes of Freedom Jazz Dance. How do you find the next "chord" in C major? D, G, C of course. E, A, D next. Then? F, B, E. OMG, a tritone in the major scale harmonisation! Way back when, I looked at this and thought, "You can do this in seconds, fifths or sixths, too!"

After that little digression, is there anyone who can't tell the difference between Bill Evans and McCoy Tyner even if they're both heard solo?
Food for thought, both are very stylized, influential players.
 
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