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Vintage or modern to learn on?

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Howsey

Howsey

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39
Just a follow on.
I found reference that confirms it was made during 1926-27. Pierret were only at the address embossed on the bell for those 2 years.
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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5,853
Just a follow on.
I found reference that confirms it was made during 1926-27. Pierret were only at the address embossed on the bell for those 2 years.
That feels much more probable than 1920. Still quite modern keywork though.
This means that the model dates in Bassic Sax and SaxPics are wrong.
 
OP
Howsey

Howsey

Member
Messages
39
Just as a matter of interest, any idea as the production numbers for these types of companies during this time.
ie. 1 x saxophone a day, 1 a week, what would you think?
 

farina_man

New Member
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12
I've just seen this thread. I have collected Pierrets over the last 15 - 20 years, and I can tell you that the pre-war models are excellent horns. The post-war ones such as the Artist, and Super Artist are OK but not outstanding, although the Competition models are good. This "corps embouti" alto was most likely made in the late 1920's. Pierrets were largely handmade and therefore can have quirks of intonation (like ALL 1920's saxes) but I've never found any with problems like those I've often found on Conns, Bueschers and Martins of that era. The one characteristic of these Pierrets is their "open" blow - they can be a delight to play. Since 1995 my regular no.1 playing tenor has been a late 20's Pierret "Vibrator" ( my back-up tenors are a 1928 Conn Chu, a 1930's Martin Handcraft and a 1949 Conn 10M) and it feels like an extension of my arm now. I have also had many Pierret altos. Over the years I've had Selmer altos and tenors (26s, BAs, Mk6s, Super80), and Conns, Bueschers, Martins, Couesnons, Hawkes, Kohlerts, Keilwerths, Kings - even a couple of Yamahas, and the Pierret tops the lot! And as far as learning on a old sax is concerned, as someone said above, all the old guys learned on what was available then: Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Benny Carter, Johnny Hodges, Charlie Parker, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane...……..they seemed to manage OK! Keep the Pierret, but fix that octave key(!) and enjoy its beautiful tone and unstuffy blow - you won't regret it! By the way, although the "LP" on the bell stands for L. Pierret, I can assure you that it is a low pitch horn by the measurement and by the fact that I've never seen a high-pitch Pierret sax in all these years.
Pierret and me.jpg
 
OP
Howsey

Howsey

Member
Messages
39
I've just seen this thread. I have collected Pierrets over the last 15 - 20 years, and I can tell you that the pre-war models are excellent horns. The post-war ones such as the Artist, and Super Artist are OK but not outstanding, although the Competition models are good. This "corps embouti" alto was most likely made in the late 1920's. Pierrets were largely handmade and therefore can have quirks of intonation (like ALL 1920's saxes) but I've never found any with problems like those I've often found on Conns, Bueschers and Martins of that era. The one characteristic of these Pierrets is their "open" blow - they can be a delight to play. Since 1995 my regular no.1 playing tenor has been a late 20's Pierret "Vibrator" ( my back-up tenors are a 1928 Conn Chu, a 1930's Martin Handcraft and a 1949 Conn 10M) and it feels like an extension of my arm now. I have also had many Pierret altos. Over the years I've had Selmer altos and tenors (26s, BAs, Mk6s, Super80), and Conns, Bueschers, Martins, Couesnons, Hawkes, Kohlerts, Keilwerths, Kings - even a couple of Yamahas, and the Pierret tops the lot! And as far as learning on a old sax is concerned, as someone said above, all the old guys learned on what was available then: Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Benny Carter, Johnny Hodges, Charlie Parker, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane...……..they seemed to manage OK! Keep the Pierret, but fix that octave key(!) and enjoy its beautiful tone and unstuffy blow - you won't regret it! By the way, although the "LP" on the bell stands for L. Pierret, I can assure you that it is a low pitch horn by the measurement and by the fact that I've never seen a high-pitch Pierret sax in all these years. View attachment 14779
Thank you so much for your detailed reply. It’s a great endorsement. Whilst I can’t play yet it does look really nice. I did find out that it was made 1926-27 due to fact that Pierret only occupied the address engraved on the bell during that time. As it does need a professional set up and during this time that’s quite difficult to get done (lockdown etc). I’ve got myself an old Amati deluxe (which is ok for now ) to practice on. I’ve been in two minds with the Pierret whether to keep or sell. The money could help towards a better sax to learn on but I do find myself getting attached to it already. Thanks also for the list of players. I’ll check those out. I do need to get a case for the Pierret. I presume any alto case should be ok?
D3975754-9BFC-49BC-82BF-745D0458ADA4.jpeg
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
Subscriber
Messages
5,853
I do need to get a case for the Pierret. I presume any alto case should be ok?
You cannot assume that a vintage sax will fit in a modern case, because the bell keys are on the other side.
Hiscox and Protec XL cases will be OK (but expensive). Others may or may not be. A soft case will probably be OK, but it won't protect the sax much.
 
OP
Howsey

Howsey

Member
Messages
39
You cannot assume that a vintage sax will fit in a modern case, because the bell keys are on the other side.
Hiscox and Protec XL cases will be OK (but expensive). Others may or may not be. A soft case will probably be OK, but it won't protect the sax much.
Thanks, something else to bear in mind then.
 

farina_man

New Member
Messages
12
I do need to get a case for the Pierret. I presume any alto case should be ok?
No, because the bell keys are on the left, as nigeld says above. The old-fashioned "box-type" will work, and Hiscoxes are excellent - I use them for both alto and tenor Pierrets with no problems. Yes they are expensive, but you can often pick them up s/hand on Ebay for around £50, which is worth it for the protection. That looks like a very nice Pierret. As it stands it's probably only worth about £200-ish, so keep it and enjoy it!
 
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