All profit supporting special needs music education and Help Musicians
Tutorials

Too many notes in jazz?

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
7,891
Which brings this to mind ...
Jose Feliciano and Cannonball.
Rhys
That is great! I did a search and found several more videos of Cannonball playing with Feliciano. It just shows musicians will do just about anything for a gig---even Cannonball. :p

1592327909605.jpeg


My teacher and his wife dressed up for a Star Wars "Cantina Band" gig. He said he makes more money playing at openings of Star Wars movies than he does on any other gig.
 

TBay

Member
Messages
61
Here’s an interesting fact. I read once that in Japan, in days of old, Monks used to duel each other over their Shakuhachi playing skills. The challenge wasn’t fast fingers or dexterity, but to play one single note better than one’s opponent …
A single note can have a massive impact in songs. My favourite is the first low D in another brick in the wall. You can see the impact in the crowd when you ring that one out!
 

CliveMA

Member
Messages
514
A single note can have a massive impact in songs.
For me, the master at locking-in the listener with a single note is Branford Marsalis. Here are two offerings. In La Valse Kendall, the first note's gentle expressiveness makes you sigh. In contrasting style, in Treat it Gentle, the aggressive attack on the first note sets the scene for the whole lively piece, which includes a repeated single note motif to delight the listener.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4ODYGs1H9Y


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3R8-mrtj3A
 
OP
Pete Effamy

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,281
For me, the master at locking-in the listener with a single note is Branford Marsalis. Here are two offerings. In La Valse Kendall, the first note's gentle expressiveness makes you sigh. In contrasting style, in Treat it Gentle, the aggressive attack on the first note sets the scene for the whole lively piece, which includes a repeated single note motif to delight the listener.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4ODYGs1H9Y


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3R8-mrtj3A
He’s really channeling Bechet in the second video. He’s not a favourite player of mine, though some stuff he plays is simply sublime. He’s all over the Robert Redford film Sleepers. Fabulous.
 

CliveMA

Member
Messages
514
He’s not a favourite player of mine, though some stuff he plays is simply sublime.
I love his sublime stuff (generally his records) but there are some tracks I cancel within a few notes, too (most everything he plays at Jazz festivals but then I dislike almost everyone at Jazz festivals!) What do you dislike about Branford's play? Soprano or Tenor or both?
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,583
A single note can have a massive impact in songs. My favourite is the first low D in another brick in the wall. You can see the impact in the crowd when you ring that one out!
I'm sure there are a good few Miles Davis examples too
 
OP
Pete Effamy

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,281
I love his sublime stuff (generally his records) but there are some tracks I cancel within a few notes, too (most everything he plays at Jazz festivals but then I dislike almost everyone at Jazz festivals!) What do you dislike about Branford's play? Soprano or Tenor or both?
I like his soprano playing more than tenor, I think that he has a bigger voice. For me, he doesn’t stand out enough on tenor amongst exalted company.
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,583
I'm sure there are a good few Miles Davis examples too
Actually- a challenge, is there a saxophone equivalent? The first thing that springs to mind is King Curtis opening altissimo scream on the Live at Filmore West album and- inevitably- there’s going to be something by Jan Garbarek….
 

Alexandra

Member
Subscriber
Messages
130
One of the true masters of playing in this style that I love to listen to is Aubra Graves. There is a channel on YouTube where you can listen to Aubra play dozens of great tunes.

Wonderful to be introduced to such an incredible player! Such a beautiful tone, masterful melodic phrasing with intent and feeling. Obviously this is the accumulation of years of playing but I think some are able to convey emotion better than others.

I think in this age of social media 'boosting' musicians careers (Instagram, YouTube etc) there's a need for the emerging player to stand out from the crowd, appeal to his jazz peers and show a virtuosity that can help them generate further income, through online lessons, downloadable content etc. This seems to preclude the type of playing by Aubra Graves which I think is a great shame.

Is the clinical, highly technical tutoring of jazz a natural progression of the genre, coupled with the above mentioned social media 'effect', something we should embrace as natural progress or is it potentially alienating the general public? Is this transition only natural, given that the early gigging and learning style of the past greats was so organic and more physically social than it is now, and often under repression and hardships.

These past conditions can't be recreated (and many aspects shouldn't be), but essentially I believe any creative individual is at their best when drawing on emotion and using it to fuel their output. I think a collective, organic and less clinical approach is needed. But everyone has to earn a living so the balance is tough! We don't all want to sound like the 'Chosen One' to make a living.
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
7,891
A single note can have a massive impact in songs. My favourite is the first low D in another brick in the wall. You can see the impact in the crowd when you ring that one out!
The emotion in a "single note" reminded me of this song from John Coltrane's Ballad Album "You Don't Know What Love Is".

 
Saxholder Pro

Members OnlineStatistics

Help!Mailing List
Top Bottom