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solder bleed - stripping the lacquer from a vintage saxophone

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peterpick

peterpick

Member
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388
The bottom photo is the lacquer just "peeling off".
that's really great jbt, thanks very much for looking that out. looks a bit ugly, i must say! but it's all in a good cause. people still relacquer trumpets, i understand, but relacquering is out of fashion for saxophones.
 

converse

New Member
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12
If hot water works, presumably steam would as well? In which case maybe one of those steam cleaners with a precision steam jet might let you just clean off the area that is particularly bothering you? I've used one for targetted paint removal on Victorian ceiling plaster and its worked very well. It might let you save the rest of the lacquer, which surely would be a good thing.
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
Messages
1,327
If hot water works, presumably steam would as well? In which case maybe one of those steam cleaners with a precision steam jet might let you just clean off the area that is particularly bothering you? I've used one for targetted paint removal on Victorian ceiling plaster and its worked very well. It might let you save the rest of the lacquer, which surely would be a good thing.
It's an interesting thought, although I am not certain what apparatus you are referring to. I have seen steam cleaners which jewelers use, those are impressive rigs, albeit bulky, stationary, and expensive. What sort of rig allows you to move about a room, localizing the steam 'stream' ? Also wondering if steam would be hot enough and how long one might have to keep it focused on a spot.
 

converse

New Member
Messages
12
I've got one of these which we use round the house.


Its got a long hose and a small nozzle for cleaning round sinks etc. I'm pretty sure that would work. It will take oil based paints off if you leave it long enough. You can clean ovens with it as well. Steam is a pretty powerful solvent.

I used a standard wallpaper steamer with point nozzle for the paint stripping job on the Victorian cornice. That worked brilliantly - all the overpainted distemper fell off leaving the original gilding and oil paint. etc intact. Customer then painted it white........
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
Messages
1,327
Interesting.....thanks. Looks like one would need to rig up a much more localized nozzle for a sax nook/cranny. But a cool device !
 
OP
peterpick

peterpick

Member
Messages
388
it's an interesting idea, and i'm sure steam would be effective, but i think i would prefer to strip the whole thing.
 
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