Reeds Reed Question - From Vandoren To AN Other

Ivan

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#21
I was hoping to find a hardware solution because the playing solution requires a lot of concentration when you can't hear yourself too well (or at all ;) ) and up to now isn't 100% reliable, but I guess a little more practice will make it easier.
I find it easier to achieve high notes into altissimo when playing less loudly at home even with a nice soft 2 strength

My hardware solution is to use a screaming mouthpiece which gains high note consistency at the cost of a depth of tone which is lost anyway in the maelstrom of noise. I can hit the low notes without a subtlety that again I don't need
 

saxyjt

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#25
Going back through the thread, it sounds like clipping or trimming is you best bet. At least worth a try.

I got some trimmers off a well known shopping website for very little money. The only trouble was I ordered both alto and tenor but received a couple of alto trimmers. They reimbursed me for the mistake and I got a tenor from another supplier. I didn't got for the pricey ones that the reputable brands offer.

Now, if you want to try, you can always carefully cut down the tip with a pair of sharp scissors! No more than a mm. Then try it again!

Good luck! Finding good reeds can be a real pain.
 

David Roach

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#31
@Veggie Dave this is a real problem - playing in very loud surroundings and playing high. I've been playing soprano in a band for many years and had to develop a technique and find equipment to cope with the extreme demands. One thing I have found is that a shorter facing on a mouthpiece can be helpful under a pressurised circumstance.

A short facing will help when the embouchure is tired, or you can't hear properly, since it gives the reed less room for flexibility (something most mouthpiece makers try to increase within the bounds of good tone and intonation). Down side, short facings can be restrictive under normal circumstances, and can be challenging to get a real depth of sound from, but they have 'saved my life' in terms of some of the music I have been expected to perform.

If you are playing a Vandoren T8, you might like to experiment with a T9 which has a somewhat shorter facing and a slightly more open tip but in my experience retains quite a good punch (don't go up as far as a T10 which is a darker piece).
 

saxyjt

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#32
@Veggie Dave have you ever tried playing a baritone reed on tenor?

I do that frequently and it can be quite rewarding! Last time I did that was on a mouthpiece that was way too open for me and with a very short table, I used a baritone 2 and it was much better than with any other reed I tried before.

I've read here somewhere some other member do that (@Nick Wyver ?) and they can perhaps provide more educated details about the pros and cons. I'd probably try the same reed strength.
 

Nick Wyver

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#33
I've read here somewhere some other member do that (@Nick Wyver ?) and they can perhaps provide more educated details about the pros and cons. I'd probably try the same reed strength.
Not me, although I have tried it (occasionally accidentally). Baritone reeds are too expensive. They also overhang the edge of the mouthpiece. I can't see the point.
 
#34
According to a Saxophone Journal (Volume 33 No. 3 Jan/Feb 2009) interview with Lenny Pickett he uses Vandoren Blue Box No. 3 bass clarinet reeds on his tenor saxophone mouthpieces Berg Larsen 130/0 SMS and Vandoren V-16 T-95. You could give these reeds a go because they should be narrower than a tenor saxophone reed and therefore a bit harder.

Greg S.
 

David Roach

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#35
For info: In metal, the T9 S chamber and T95 are the same mouthpiece.
To quote the Vandoren catalogue:
S chamber: ''The original V16 model relabelled with the Small indication. A centered sound with a lot of projection''
 

Ivan

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#39
...playing in very loud surroundings and playing high. I've been playing soprano in a band for many years and had to develop a technique and find equipment to cope with the extreme demands...
Given the level at which you play a punter like me would assume that the audiotechnical elements of your performance would be of the highest standard: decent sound engineers, decent foldback, beef sandwiches and a bottle of IPA in the dressing room etc. @David Roach

I'm interested to know what are the real-life demands that you face when you are making musical magic on stage?
 

Veggie Dave

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#40
If you are playing a Vandoren T8, you might like to experiment with a T9 which has a somewhat shorter facing and a slightly more open tip but in my experience retains quite a good punch (don't go up as far as a T10 which is a darker piece).
Thanks, I'll give one a go.

@Veggie Dave have you ever tried playing a baritone reed on tenor?
I haven't. Given how expensive they are, I think I should either find a tenor reed that works or work on my playing in these situations.

I'm interested to know what are the real-life demands that you face when you are making musical magic on stage?
As are numerous others. ;)
 
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