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Saxophones De-Mythifying the Purple Logo

Saxlicker

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,928
Ha that's a great idea!

If the truth be known, I am trying to talk myself out of the long journey towards buying a vintage horn. My 1980s vintage purple logo Yamaha 62 is plenty good enough for my standard of playing and there is no question that the most important thing is to practise more, not spend more money!
Completely agree, this was the Yamaha top of the range horn for many many years after. It's good enough for all of us though will not be everybody's ideal taste or concept.

I still love the look of old horns though, so the next question (probably for another thread) is: should I get it de-laquered when I next get it serviced?!
I wouldn't, the true beauty of a horn is to let it age gracefully so long as the function and capability isn't affected.
i.e. leave small dents in awkward places.
A friend of mine has a nice example of a Lion and Crown Martin (Committee II ?) and though it perhaps wasn't the most sought after horn on the planet at the time or now, it's shear original beauty is more impressive as the world has moved on. Lets talk Yamaha FS1E, MKII Cortina......well you get the picture, nice when well kept/restored as intended.
This de-lacquering thing in my (controversial) Opinion, was also done to disguise relacquers in the hope it would increase saleability/value and sold under the guise of freeing up the horns resonance. I actually have no idea how much difference it makes regarding that so I'll not comment but once this 'idea' was out there many people have done it. To me if a horn is original...leave it that way. It grows fondly into its place in history.
Old horns with lacquer missing are one thing, de-lacquered horns are another.
There that told you :thumb: didn't it.
Ultimately though, do what makes you enjoy it most. But beware, this would mean a full strip down and increase the cost of a full overhaul by a fair amount. Certainly couldn't be done with a service.
 

cavilln

New Member
Messages
9
I wouldn't, the true beauty of a horn is to let it age gracefully so long as the function and capability isn't affected. i.e. leave small dents in awkward places.
.
That's really helpful advice. I'm gonna re-post this on a 'de-laquer' thread and see what others think
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
Subscriber
Messages
5,633
I still love the look of old horns though, so the next question (probably for another thread) is: should I get it de-laquered when I next get it serviced?!
In my opinion, definitely not - it's a vintage Yamaha. The correct vintage Yamaha look should be mainly shiny with one or two tasteful patches of wear to make it more interesting. :old:
 

CliveMA

Member
Messages
346
I have a decision to make that I should really be concentrating on right now... So I’ve decided to adopt the subtle art of distraction in a way of allowing the important decision time to mature in my subconscious ready for when I can’t procrastinate any further...

As this thread has maneuvered itself into the Yamaha neck territory I thought I’d bring myself up to date... As you can see I’m really avoiding that decision...

So here we go:

My old Yamaha catalogue showed a number of custom necks:

For Alto:
G1 and M1

For Tenor:
G1 G3 M1 and F1

These are all Customs, the 82’s came with the G1 neck as did the 875 alto, but the 875 tenor came with the G3.

The catalogue gives no information on the difference between any these necks or the F1 and M1. My suspicion is that the M1 is close to the old 62 neck before they came up with the non custom G1.

Looking on Yamaha’s site they seemed to have realised they were missing out on offering different necks and actually given some details about their necks this time... But they have also done away with the old models, so today we have:

AE1, AC1, AV1 if you want them in sliver add AG at the end (AG being the symbol for silver in the periodic table! Personally I think using 47, the atomic number would have been a bit more classy.)

Can you imagine it...
“Hey sax god what you playing?”​
“Well I got me this here AC1-47 on my 62 with a 4C refaced to 9*”​

It just sound just so much better than:
“yeah I got this AC1AG” - That sounds like a moped.​

But I might be digressing a bit here....

For the tenors substitute the A for a T and you’ve got the swan neck.

E is the medium bore “quick response and superb intonation.”
C is the smallest bore and based on the original 62.
V is the largest bore “free blowing and extremely flexible”

Yamaha do a rather fine job of visually representing the differences:




As C1 is based on the original 62 neck, it is perfectly clearly that the original 62 neck was intended for beginners, hence it's popularity with a few professional players here and there that you don't often hear about.

So there we are... Or so I thought....

The 62 MkIII comes with a new 62 neck. The MkII had G1 stamped on the neck and the new one has 62 stamped on it, which is presumably different from the original G1 and the new E, C, and V custom models, so where in the graphical representation of tone does it sit? And how about the old G1 and G3 necks for that matter?

The Custom Z now comes with the V1 but the Custom EX still comes with the G1 for alto and G3 for the tenor.

For those looking for the Classic 62 neck... well according to my old Yamaha sax catalogue the 475 series of horns came with... “a classic 62 style neck for optimum sound and playability.

I’m not sure how the 480 series fits in, they have obviously updated the neck socket as it can now accommodate the custom necks, but if the neck is the same as the 475 or not, I do not know.

I'm not sure I'm much the wiser after any of this...
Reviving this old thread to ask if anyone has changed necks to the new C, E or V style necks (on Yamaha Tenor)? If so, what do you think?
In particular, I'm wondering if anyone has experience comparing the new 62style neck on the 62iii with any of the above custom necks?

As of 2020, the Yamaha 875 ships with the E style neck, the 82Z ships with the V style neck, the 62 ships with a 62style neck and the 480 ships with a 480style neck. The C style neck is based on the original 62 neck and has a narrower bore. The V neck is more open and the E is in between. I can't find any info on how the 62style and 480style necks compare.

Note: please don't post any advice about what I should do. I'd simply like to know your experience with these Yamaha necks.
 

ProfJames

Elementary member
Messages
12,093
Has anybody ever put that amount of effort into a neck!! I lost track of what you were trying to say half way through the mail..! Mouthpiece and reed and any recommended neck
 

CliveMA

Member
Messages
346
Has anybody ever put that amount of effort into a neck!! I lost track of what you were trying to say half way through the mail..! Mouthpiece and reed and any recommended neck
Do you have any experience with Yamaha custom Tenor necks c, e, v?
 

Greg Strange

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,019
I play a Peter Ponzol Gold Plated Custom Neck on my 34 year old Yamaha 62 series alto and I play a Phil Barone Silver Plated Custom Neck on my similar age Yamaha 62 series tenor. I also have a Peter Ponzol Gold Plated Custom Neck for the tenor as well, but prefer the Barone Neck...

Greg S.
 

CliveMA

Member
Messages
346
I play a Peter Ponzol Gold Plated Custom Neck on my 34 year old Yamaha 62 series alto and I play a Phil Barone Silver Plated Custom Neck on my similar age Yamaha 62 series tenor. I also have a Peter Ponzol Gold Plated Custom Neck for the tenor as well, but prefer the Barone Neck...

Greg S.
Were there specific tonal qualities you gained with the custom necks? Do they affect intonation or response in low, mid, high or altissimo?
 

Greg Strange

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,019
Were there specific tonal qualities you gained with the custom necks? Do they affect intonation or response in low, mid, high or altissimo?
Good questions. With the Peter Ponzol neck on my alto I think it enhances the mid-range of the horn, making it a bit more beefier without losing the clarity of the original 62 neck. With the Barone neck on my tenor I think the geometry of the Barone is different to the 62 neck...I would call the Barone neck "big bore" compared to the original 62 neck, I think it also brings out the mid-range of the horn. I have never been really with my tenor sound...in the lower register I sound like cross between a foghorn and a stag in rutting season and in the higher register of the horn like a strangled chook. I think with my current setup of purple logo 62 tenor body, Barone neck and Otto Link Super Tone Master mouthpiece and Rovner ligature I am finally getting to like my tenor playing and tonal quality and it also gives me the flexibility to have a vintage style tenor sound like Don Byas or modern tenor sound like Ernie Watts, Stan Harrison, John Klemmer, Tom Scott, etc...:thumb:

Greg S.
 
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