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Saxophones Buescher true tone 1925

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
Messages
743
Location
New Mexico, US
Hi it's metal the 2 keys below have a roller. Layout seems almost the same as my hanson v alto but no high f key. Sounds lovely and deep but a bit quieter.. think I'm going to love it...
OK...actually, no it's not the metal G# touch..it's the pearl touch.

This is the metal touch I was referring to (one of the design changes):


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JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
Messages
743
Location
New Mexico, US
Basically, you have the less sought-after version of the horn. Still a decent horn, just a bit less refined. I don't believe they changed much in the body spec, just some keywork which made the instrument a bit more responsive under the fingers.
Please correct me if I'm wrong, don't the older TT's with the round G# also lack a front F?
Some of the last iterations of the pearl G# touch version actually had the Front F, I believe. Not sure if this might have been an available option, though, as others from same period indeed seem to be absent of it.

Re: Mouthpieces, OK yeah others have already chimed in. It isn't the material of the mouthpiece which is gonna give it its intrinsic performance qualities as much as the design and geometry. So concluding you 'need' a metal mouthpiece to make the horn 'louder'...is not an efficient path to take in a mouthpiece search.

IMHO, these aren't very mouthpiece finicky unless you start getting into high-baffle, small or small/medium chamber 'pieces. Stick with something fairly conventional, medium chamber or larger, baffle ranging from minimal to medium (rubber, plastic, or metal - whatever) and these tend to respond quite well.
NOW...fact is....one can make an argument that old bueschers are a bit more 'delicate toned' than other horns an owner may have experienced before. BUT...sometimes people also mis-identify the delicate toned-ness, when what they might have there is a leak someplace.
 
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jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,611
Location
Betelgeuse
I've used a range of mouthpieces on my True Tone. Mostly played my Yanagisawa 7 metal, which isn't too extreme, but I've also used an Oleg Maestro, Vandoren Jumbo Java, Rico Metalite, Britone ROC and a Runyon Jaguar. All these are loud, bright mouthpieces, but they all worked fine on the old TT. So I'd suggest starting with something relatively middle of the road, but not feeling that you have to stay there as you get used to the horn.
 
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eb424

Member
Messages
121
Location
london
Thanks all I managed to play it a bit last night with a daddario select jazz no 6. I really struggle to play this mpc on my series v. Also broke the ok and had to take it to Dawkes they recloned it's been overhauled well recently but needed a pad 're set and a few other little bits done. Overall with the tone and what I paid for it I think I'm well happy. I would like to give it to someone who can really play to see or hear it's limitations. I'd like to use it as my main sax as im still learning and the keywork is slightly different to my series v. Any thoughts greatly received.
 

Clivey

Senior Member
Messages
789
Location
Edinburgh/Hot Rock off African Coast
I have the tenor version with pearl g# and I have very recently redone pads with the closest thing to original ie. Plain, no resonator type.
The horn is probably as good as my 10m in many ways including intonation at the cost of having slightly less edge. It's also a very light instrument and a complete pleasure to play Most of these modern made saxes just seem overly built to me. This horn has a partially ribbed construction but feels light perhaps even delicate.
A very deliciouslly Saxy and Woody tone too with my plain old yam 6c.
To top it all I got it for about 120 quid and the " sheep leather" pads arrived from Hong Kong for about 7.
 

Phil

Member
Messages
502
Location
France
+100,000 cubed exponentially!

Material is not the issue. The issue with matching a mouthpiece to a horn is chamber size. Additionally, there were tons of ebonite and bakalite mouthpieces in the 20's

Metal is not brighter. I can make a dark and cavernous metal mouthpiece. I can make a screaming bright hard rubber mouthpiece.

Im not going to get into a debate on the extremely minor acoustic properties of different materials. I will say stop believing everything you read in mouthpiece ads and internet forums where half the posts are written by people who believe what the read in marketing hype.

You can pretty much figure that ads are about as honest as politicians.

Meanwhile, the horn should play in tune and be nice. They do have quite a compact tone but that isnt a bad thing if you like it. Also typically a very sweet tone. They favor medium to large chambers. You may have tuning problems if you try to stick a modern high baffle piece on the cork. Otherwise, they are good horns.
 
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eb424

Member
Messages
121
Location
london
I agree with everything people here have said. I really like the tone either with the kanee I can't believe how easy the sax blows with the daddario select jazz mouthpiece I struggle with on the series v. I need to move one of the alto s on as I don't need 2.. I love the tt but was told safes have moved on a lot since then but tbf there's something about playing a sax from that era that is phenomenal. Also I have never played a metal mpc and the chance to buy a used otto link came up at a good price so was looking for some guidance as to whether it would suit the tt.
 

Hassles

Member
Messages
40
Location
Australia
Those mid 20s Bueschers are nothing short of astounding when functioning as Gus intended. If you have any doubts about small hands etc etc just google Johnny Hodges and check him out. He is not a small man but his playing on his True-Tone is close to other-worldly. I have one - 219XXX - and would not be without it.
 

nigeld

I think I need a different ligature
Subscriber
Messages
4,406
Location
Bristol
I had the same experience with my Buescher True Tone alto. It looked gorgeous and I loved the sound, but couldn't get on with the key positions. I really discovered the problem when I played alto in a quartet one day, and had to sight-read fast passages. So I decided to compromise on tone and go for ergonomics, and I haven't regretted it. Life is too short to be struggling with the keywork. But I spent some time trying to find a modern alto with a tone that I liked - I finally got a Buffet S1.

I also changed from a Buescher Big-B bari to a modern Yamaha YBS-32 and am much happier with it.

But this is not purely a vintage thing - some people find the keywork much more comfortable on one modern sax than another. Some instruments "feel right" and some don't.
 
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