Tutorials

Saxophones YTS 23 Why change ?

sizzzzler

Member
Messages
88
Location
London
Many of us have or used to have a YTS 23. I have one at the moment. Lovely player, flexible, tough lacquer, takes any mouthpiece, spot on intonation, and can be set up to play at a demon pace.

There are plenty of reviews and comments full of praise, but I want to know what tenor YTS 23 owners moved on to and what the difference was.
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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743
Location
New Mexico, US
Perhaps because there are horns which sound better, which feel better, and which are built better.

Those might be some reasons.

I cast no aspersions on 21/23's at all; I sell many....they do what they were intended to do pretty well, and their secondhand price point is always reasonable.

There are so many wonderful varieties of horns out there, contemporary and vintage...and these varieties are now more accessible than pre-internet days...that if one has the practical/budgetary opportunity to expand their experience and see what other horns can do....why not take that opportunity ?
 

Bob M.

Member
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54
Location
At my house
Why doesn't everyone have a <insert color here> car, or <insert model here> car? as the above review mentions "My 25+ year love-affair with my own YTS23 is a matter of public record - and while I've recently moved on (I now play a TJ RAW), the 23 still has a place in my heart."...they moved on also. Musical instruments are like wives....sometimes you just decide to try another and move on...sometimes you don't.
 

altissimo

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,238
Location
leicester
Lovely player, flexible, tough lacquer, takes any mouthpiece, spot on intonation, and can be set up to play at a demon pace.
given that list of attributes there's really no reason to change. As long as the instrument's not getting in the way of making the music that you want to make, then there's no reason to get a different sax... the sound you make is down to you
Yamaha's are practical and reliable and you can get spare parts for them fairly easily. The only reason why I don't play a Yamaha is that I don't get on with the ergonomics of modern saxophones
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
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965
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Oneonta, NY
given that list of attributes there's really no reason to change. As long as the instrument's not getting in the way of making the music that you want to make, then there's no reason to get a different sax... the sound you make is down to you
Yamaha's are practical and reliable and you can get spare parts for them fairly easily. The only reason why I don't play a Yamaha is that I don't get on with the ergonomics of modern saxophones
I think it just illustrates that we are all individuals with different needs, wants and aesthetics. Hence, there are many different saxophone manufacturers who have been able to thrive.

It's interesting. I have two altos. My Yamaha YAS-62 Purple Logo is ergonomically, the perfect horn for me. I have small hands and every single key is within easy reach. I also like the tone I can get and it is a nice looking horn. And yet, it's my back up and I play my King Super 20.

Being a vintage horn, the ergonomics of the King are a bit challenging. It took a fair amount of time to get used to the octave key and left-hand pinky table. The stacks are also inline rather than offset, although I found that an easy adjustment. To me, it has been well worth the extra effort because tonally, it has just a little bit more. To my ears, the sound is bigger. The low end is fuller and the top sparkles. There is also a psychological component there. I find it stunningly beautiful and that boosts my confidence (strange as that may sound).

I like the fact that we are all individuals and have different preferences regarding gear. Makes for some really fun discussions.
 

hedgehog

I love singletrack.
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133
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Minnesota, USA
I find it stunningly beautiful and that boosts my confidence (strange as that may sound).
Indeed! Now...does that confidence translate into your playing? It would not surprise me, although it'd be hard to test that idea. It certainly seems to make playing more enjoyable.
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
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Messages
965
Location
Oneonta, NY
Indeed! Now...does that confidence translate into your playing? It would not surprise me, although it'd be hard to test that idea. It certainly seems to make playing more enjoyable.
That is a great question. My confidence has increased quite a bit over the last few months. But in all honesty, that has to be mainly attributed to practice. My sessions have been very focused and goal oriented and that is directly connected to having been moved to lead alto in my big band. That was unexpected and it motivated me to rise to the occasion and not let the section or the band down.

Having a cool-looking horn is the icing on the cake, I would say. ;)
 

saxyjt

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,108
Location
France
It's interesting. I have two altos. My Yamaha YAS-62 Purple Logo is ergonomically, the perfect horn for me. I have small hands and every single key is within easy reach. I also like the tone I can get and it is a nice looking horn. And yet, it's my back up and I play my King Super 20.
The king super 20 is clearly an iconic horn. I wish I could try one. Like you, I have a yas-62 that's excellent. I once had two! The second one was a random find, in excellent condition. I compared it with mine and decided to let it go, with a profit! >:)

But I have few other altos. A YAS-23s that felt very good before I repaded it, but it's even better now. I just repaded a Martin Indiana and it sounds quite good but I struggle with the ergonomics. Last, I have a french made horn attributed to Robert Drouet that I need to repad and oil properly. It was my first vintage and I made a mess if it by using a rather heavy grease that slowed down the action to a point that's rather laughable...

I took it apart a couple of weeks ago to measure the key cups and I must say the pads are well beyond their due date. I'm considering trying some Chinese kangaroo pads.

All this to say that if the basis is solid the next thing is a proper repad and setup.

Now that I'm back in business (work wise) I hope that I'll be able to experiment other makes. Yanagisawa is one of my prime targets, but as the plural implies, I have a few others in mind, like SML, Could, Beaugnier/Leblanc and perhaps some Italian horns...

Well, although I I'm a fan of Yamahas, I'm curious to broaden my experience and taste as many other horns as I can.

I have a few friends with Selmers and I'll invite them to taste some of my mouthpieces while I try their horns... :p
 

ellinas

Senior Member
Messages
797
Location
Athens, Greece
I think yts23 is a ridiculously easy to play horn. It’s intonation is spot on. It’s original action sucks but most techs ,are it fast really easy. Also it’s quite bright and neutral.
I ended up with a beaugnier ( French vintage ) tenor because of its built in lightning fast action and fatter sound. Sometimes I miss the Yamaha .... it was such easy and a joy to play .... but I’m really interested in a fatter more complex sound that I couldn’t achieve with any Yamaha. Other than that its the best option when I don’t have my tenor.now to the OP .... if you don’t know why you should switch to an other tenor ... please don’t ... it’s GAS ... no real need....
 

Ne0Wolf7

Member
Messages
417
Location
Long Island
One piece of advice I got that sticks to me is that you should only change gear if the new stuff either lets you do something you couldn't do with the old stuff or makes it easier, and you shouldn't go searching until you either need to do something you can't do or think something should be easier than it is (provided you really tried to get it on the current gear).
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,355
Location
Sweden
I want to know what tenor YTS 23 owners moved on to
Most YTS 23/25 players use to move on to YTS 62, Yanis, Selmer ...... . Not many that buys an older horn.

II've played many saxes over the years. From MkVI, King Super 20, Conn Artist 6M and 10M, Martin Comm .... to YTS 25, Dörfler und Jörka, The New King (Keilwerth), Jupiter 700 series, Dolnet, B&S, Amati Weltklang, G4M ..... and some other strange saxes. Martin Comm saxes are #1 for me. From the very first time I hold a "The Martin Magna Tenor" I knew it was the righ saxt for me. But this was 37 years ago and things have changed. I don't think the sax is so important. As long as it plays the way I want the sax to play, it's ok for me. I sounds like me on all saxes. More important is the mouthpieces. My current mouthpieces can be hard to play well on older saxes from the 30's, 40's or 50's. So I play more on modern horns these days. A YTS 61 or a Keilwerth SXwould be nice saxes to play ...... .

.
 

InWalkedBud

Member
Messages
80
Location
Canada
While you'll sound more or less like yourself regardless of what horn you play, there are tangible material and sonic differences between different horns. Life's short, and variety spices it up. Have fun trying lots of new horns, and keep the ones that sing to you.
 
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