Tutorials

yoga breathing

saxophonedaniel

New Member
Messages
23
Location
Hong Kong
I read some yoga breathing info in pete's website

when you are performing, will you use all the 3 steps of yoga breathing to get in air to fill up bottom of your lung (diaphragm), sides of your lung, and upper part of your lung?

OR we should only use the step one, i.e. diaphragm ?


thanks
 

Lloyd

Member
Messages
208
Location
Hertfordshire
I posted earlier this year about a stammering course that I went on. I'm not a stammerer myself, but my daughter suffered quite badly so I spent 4 days watching them pratice costal breathing. This is pretty much the same thing as opera singers use and is espoused by Pete and others. I don't know about the different stages but what they were doing was breathing from the diaphragm (base of the stomach) until your chest visibly expands as much as it can. It is at this point, at the top of the breathing cycle, that you have no option but to expell air and this is when the stammerer speaks. It works and I tried it out when playing the sax with great results. I can only equate it to sucking your stomach in when you breath in as though you are holding in a beer belly (no offence intended; I'm sure you have a six-pack!). When playing, whenever you take a breath make sure that you breath from the diaphragm and fill your chest with as much air as you can. You will find that your notes are stronger and more stable.
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,230
Location
The Blue Ridge Mountains
when you are performing, will you use all the 3 steps of yoga breathing to get in air to fill up bottom of your lung (diaphragm), sides of your lung, and upper part of your lung?
Only when practical, ie if you have time. If not then do stage one, or one and two.


BTW, the exercises are now on this site.

I can only equate it to sucking your stomach in when you breath in as though you are holding in a beer belly (no offence intended; I'm sure you have a six-pack!).
I would say the opposite, that when you breathe in you should push the stomach out, if you pull it in you are not making room lower down in the lungs. I may be wrong (it won't be the first time). But it's good news this works for stammering, and if it's working for you when playing saxophone in this way, then you must be doing it right!

I think it's a tricky process to explain, so different people may get the same result with different methods.

The air is not actually going into your stomach or diaphragm of course, it's just that I find it useful to visualise this happening, so sticking your stomach out while breathing in and pulling it in when breathing out seems to work
 
OP
S

saxophonedaniel

New Member
Messages
23
Location
Hong Kong
Only when practical, ie if you have time. If not then do stage one, or one and two.
Hi,

that is it is ok to fill our lung on top (i.e. the 3rd stage) if we have already filled up air via diaphragm.

It makes more sense this way, as I can fill more air into my body.

But someone may notice my shoulder is moving up (which someone may think I am doing a non-diaphragm breathing.) It also gives me some "tension" on my body when I release the air. After the breath, the first few notes will have more "energy" than I wanted. I guess I just need to do more exercise to control it.
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,230
Location
The Blue Ridge Mountains
But someone may notice my shoulder is moving up (which someone may think I am doing a non-diaphragm breathing.)
You are not supposed to raise your shoulders - you can still do stage 3 without doing that - keep them relaxed but not slouching - you will feel the difference.

But the very important thing her is not to do stage 3 without 1 and 2, and not to do stage 2 without stage 1.
 
support Tutorials CDs PPT mouthpieces
Top Bottom