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Wobbling Mouthpiece, any permanent home fixes?

randulo

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Not the plumbers' tape. Yes, I can do that and it works. But I don't want to have to apply tape every time I put it on, remove it when I take it off. That is unreasonable.
I have 6 mouthpieces. Some are tighter than others, but none are loose.
The guilty one is so loose it wobbles unless pushed way to far on the neck cork.

Is there a substance that can by put on the inside that will adjust this insider diameter permanently and not harm the cork in any way? @saxyjt did you mention doing this?
 

Pete Effamy

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You can expand the cork by letting a flame lick around it quickly. Don't think that this is permanent though, or what a tech would think. :cool:
 

randulo

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You can expand the cork by letting a flame lick around it quickly. Don't think that this is permanent though, or what a tech would think. :cool:
I won't do that because the cork works with the five others. Some tight, some easy to get on but all good seal. It's the mouthpiece that needs its diameter reduced sloghtly, with putting anything on it that will affect the cork, such as a heavy wax that would rub off.

Perhaps a resin?
 

nigeld

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randulo

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A foil wine pourer worked for me. Cut it to size then use a small dab of glue to fix it in place.

Thanks!
We probably have several of these. What kind of glue might one use that doesn't degrade or harm?
 

nigeld

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We probably have several of these. What kind of glue might one use that doesn't degrade or harm?

As far as I remember, I used ordinary contact adhesive - the same as I would use for sticking a piece of cork on. Ideally you want to use something that can be removed later if necessary.
 

Vetinari

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from another similar thread...

The curse of not having a standard mouthpiece shank ID . . . .
I, too, like to shift between mouthpieces. In order to do this, I modify mouthpieces (not metal ones) when necessary.
If the shank diameter is too small, I rebore with a dowel and sanpaper - i little a time.
If the shank diameter is too big I coat the bore with epoxy (clean the bore first). Then I use the dowel and sanpaper.
I was nervous when did this the first time, but all went well. Just be careful not to make the bore out of round or tapered.
\Bo
 

rhysonsax

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I have used some Copper foil with adhesive like This from Just Flutes and it works well and seems to last OK.

You have to take care in measuring, cutting and fixing so that it doesn't get wrinkled up or leave a gap. I have used a pencil to press it into place and that seems to work.

Rhys

PS I haven't tried to remove it yet.
 

randulo

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I think inserting a sleeve as you and Nigel suggest is a good idea. I'm checking the viability right now. We have plenty of wine pourers available.
 

randulo

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Ok, this turns out to be a good idea. The sleeve (wine pourer) doesn't stick to the mouthpiece or the cork, and it doesn't absorb liquid. It does make a good seal, so the only disadvantage would be if you're changing mouthpieces on a stage or something, you need to be careful to grab it before if falls out :)

I could glue it, but for now it's good enough. Thanks folks!
 

jbtsax

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I have posted this before, but it is on topic in this thread. I have had good results installing the Valentino Sax Neck Cork for customers who use mouthpieces with different size shanks. They compress easily to accommodate mouthpieces with smaller openings, and then return to the original thickness once the mouthpiece has been removed to provide a snug fit for mouthpieces with larger openings. They are a bit more expensive, but as instruments come back into the shop they appear to hold up well over time. The video below shows how they are installed.

 

saxyjt

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Sorry for the late answer, but others already pointed you in the right direction. As always here! :D

I used the epoxy method a few times on HR mouthpieces. The last one I treated was with some sort of clear resin as it was on a blue Syos and I didn't want to add a black or grey layer inside. But I probably didn't mix it well so it was a pain because it did solidify for hours so I had to keep applying some while avoiding the liquid to make a mess. I didn't apply enough as a consequence, so I'd have to repeat the process, but as it didn't go so well the first time, I'll reluctant to try it again unless I'm sure I have time to do it well. And these days, I'm running after time... :w00t:
 

David Dorning

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A simple solution is to find the right weight of paper and wrap it round the cork. Work out the right shape and cut yourself as many disposable adapters as you like. You won’t need to cut down too many forests.
 

Pete Thomas

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I think the thin layer of epoxy is a good fix, but for a half decent bodge you can apply some nail polish/lacquer. It dries quickly so easy to add a second coat.

It may not last forever, but look on the bright side, you can have it sparkly if you want.
 
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Jmoen3

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I just sold a Jody Jazz Superjet because of this issue... I might have kept it if I even thought this was an option lol. Thanks for the info though.
 

randulo

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I just sold a Jody Jazz Superjet because of this issue... I might have kept it if I even thought this was an option lol. Thanks for the info though.
On which saxophone? I wonder if the cork on the standard neck of each saxophone out of the factory (i.e., not a recork) are close to being about the same, "standard"? My YAS-480 is a pretty vanilla instrument and of the many pieces, only one is this loose as to be unplayable until one of the fixes is applied.

The best idea is the wine pourer because it can be reused indefinitely or until is somehow gets torn. But in a pinch, paper, etc. Applying a substance inside the mpc is fine, but more serious than the temporary solutions. Modifying the offending mouthpiece is not something I'd want to do.
 

Jmoen3

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On which saxophone? I wonder if the cork on the standard neck of each saxophone out of the factory (i.e., not a recork) are close to being about the same, "standard"?

It was on my Mauriat alto. But out of the 10+ alto pieces I have (currently lol), the Superjet was the only one that wobbled. However, Just had the neck recorked by a tech. He fit the cork to my 10mfan.
 

randulo

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He fit the cork to my 10mfan.
I think I mentioned earlier that when I got the neck recorked, "my" tech asked me to bring in all the mouthpieces I use. At that time there were two but that was an instrument I don't use any more.
 
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