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White Man's Blues

Mike

Senior Member
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559
Since I picked up my horn again I've been working on some things.
I was actually going back to the blues and I've been working on that somewhat.
I was always a fan of the blues, especially jazz blues from the Bird, Sonny Stitt, mold.
Countless others, naturally....

White Man's Blues
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_music.cfm?bandID=1289603
 
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Sue

If at first you don't succeed try try try a Gin
Subscriber
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2,358
That was worth listening to.:thumb: Nice one Mike..

Chris..
What he said ^^^ and the rhythm sounds alright to me Do you think we're always more critical about our own playing than others are?
 
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Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
What he said ^^^ and the rhythm sounds alright to me Do you think we're always more critical about our own playing than others are?
Thank you Sue...
I'm very critical with rhythm, especially with my own. True, if we cannot be critical of our own playing, we won't improve.
If rhythm isn't up to par the overall balance is off. If we're not attuned to that it, it's a hard thing to remedy.
In other words, we can't ignore this crucial part of music. So, that's what I listen for most.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,057
It's funny how listening at a later date, to a track you were disappointed with at the time, can reveal what you actually caught. Once you've forgotten or moved away from a specific interpretation I find it surprising what I actually played sometimes, unless there's any glaring mistakes which I usually erase straight away. I often find that the player in my fingers is better than the player in my head and any little wanderings from the script that are caught and remedied can add something to a piece.

Be your own harshest critic , yes, but be a constructive critic and don't beat yourself up.

What came out, came out. If we measure ourselves against perfection we will always fall short.

The brain does strange things visually and aurally to inputs, so what's heard by the listener isn't necessarily what's heard by the player and sometimes little imperfections can make a piece.
 

Wade Cornell

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2,118
Yea, the rhythm is important, but for me feeling is more important. Lots of excellent passages with only a few runs around 1:45 that didn't match the feeling of the rest. Always a treat to have a new post from you Mike as there is that feeling of total commitment to what you're doing.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
It's funny how listening at a later date, to a track you were disappointed with at the time, can reveal what you actually caught. Once you've forgotten or moved away from a specific interpretation I find it surprising what I actually played sometimes, unless there's any glaring mistakes which I usually erase straight away. I often find that the player in my fingers is better than the player in my head and any little wanderings from the script that are caught and remedied can add something to a piece.

Be your own harshest critic , yes, but be a constructive critic and don't beat yourself up.

What came out, came out. If we measure ourselves against perfection we will always fall short.

The brain does strange things visually and aurally to inputs, so what's heard by the listener isn't necessarily what's heard by the player and sometimes little imperfections can make a piece.
That's very true Colin...When I discovered a few things I did in the past I listened to it differently.
Something I may have disliked, I thought was okay later on.


Personally I'd love to have what's in my head communicate correctly with my fingers, which is why I loved composition,
because I could relate very much what was in my head onto paper. Improvisation in it's spontaneity requires knowledge
of the instrument we're using to convey the same thing. Composition does not require this.


That's always the problem. Intuitively, I know what should be played, but technically I'm highly deficient
mechanically, which is why I/we practice. We practice in order to create a smooth transition from cerebral to physical.
I always have this dream where I'm pretending to finger a saxophone but I'm riffing vocally. I have this dream all the time and I love what comes out.


I'm a critic of my playing but within reason. It's never life and death. When we have a hobby and something goes not so well, we shouldn't labor over it, because well, hobby's should be relaxing
and have a redeeming value. That's how I treat the saxophone when I'm playing it.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
Yea, the rhythm is important, but for me feeling is more important. Lots of excellent passages with only a few runs around 1:45 that didn't match the feeling of the rest. Always a treat to have a new post from you Mike as there is that feeling of total commitment to what you're doing.
Sure feeling is important Wade, but feeling and rhythm have to run parallel. They rely upon each other
or the feeling gets lost because of the compromise. Just my opinion, of course.


Ha, yeah, very notey section @1:45... and as I was running through it I'm thinking how am I going to resolve this? Just one of my many deficiencies. It's kind of like trying to time a wave when body surfing. Volume of notes do bring down the percentage of swiss watch-like rhythm. When they're going good they can give off an electrifying feeling which is why I like them now and again. It helps to create variation which is the only reason I see for them.


Thanks Wade....Total commitment or should I be committed totally? lol....
 

Wade Cornell

Well-Known Member
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2,118
I'm thinking that "they're coming to take me away ha ha" is old enough to be played as a standard. Want to give it a go?
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
I'm thinking that "they're coming to take me away ha ha" is old enough to be played as a standard. Want to give it a go?
I loved that tune when it came out. I bought the 45 and the flip side was the same tune in reverse. I loved it!
Then the Catholic church came along and had it banned! I was around 11 yrs old in 1966 and I felt the church had no
justifiable right! It's a good wholesome song!.....lol


Yes indeed, oldies but goodies! Although, I'm sure it's not in the Real book! lol.........
 

daveysaxboy

Big ruff Geordie bendy metal blower
Messages
3,312
Rhythm is important but you can be to strict i think.Said this before,Sonny Rollins !!!!!!! he is the master of playing with it.He re-shapes ,bends,strecthes and well just does what he wants with it.Some play before the beat,on the beat and after the beat.

Nice take Mike.Some nice lines.Very bebop.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
Thanks Dave!

There's nothing strict about rhythm. It either is or it's not.
Quite fundamental. Rhythm is intrinsic to melody and harmony, not the other way around.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,057
I couldn't disagree more that rhythm is intrinsic to melody and harmony. Harmony can have no melody and no rhythm and be just what it is, a harmonious sound. A melody with a shifting tempo and no rhythm can be quite moving. A beating drum can make you want to dance with no tune and no harmony.


I think there's a distinction between timing and rhythm. Some music doesn't have rhythm. I don't think Elgar could be accused of having no melody or harmony but not much foot tapping going on.

Some singers have unique phrasing which can be off beat. When I'm playing solo I can pay tribute to the rhythm with passing notes and added phrases or romanticise it and have no rhythm at all.

Playing with a rhythm section frees you up. You can be behind, in front, across, even play phrases in a different time signature. Nothing quite like playing a 12 8 phrase or two across a 4 4 beat and watch the bass players face.


Having said that, music for me is easier to get a handle on and make sense of, if it has rhythm. A difficult passage seems to stick in my brain more easily if I swing it. I've been told off for it lol.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
I couldn't disagree more that rhythm is intrinsic to melody and harmony. Harmony can have no melody and no rhythm and be just what it is, a harmonious sound. A melody with a shifting tempo and no rhythm can be quite moving. A beating drum can make you want to dance with no tune and no harmony.


I think there's a distinction between timing and rhythm. Some music doesn't have rhythm. I don't think Elgar could be accused of having no melody or harmony but not much foot tapping going on.

Some singers have unique phrasing which can be off beat. When I'm playing solo I can pay tribute to the rhythm with passing notes and added phrases or romanticise it and have no rhythm at all.

Playing with a rhythm section frees you up. You can be behind, in front, across, even play phrases in a different time signature. Nothing quite like playing a 12 8 phrase or two across a 4 4 beat and watch the bass players face.


Having said that, music for me is easier to get a handle on and make sense of, if it has rhythm. A difficult passage seems to stick in my brain more easily if I swing it. I've been told off for it lol.
You couldn't disagree more? Meaning that you feel rhythm isn't vital for melody and harmony?
I apologize Colin, if I'm not reading correctly because at the end of your post you say music is easier to get a handle on
if it has rhythm.

I will add that rhythm can be subjective. I know what it means for me and I couldn't possibly know how others feel it.
However, I can only judge, personally, from what I hear others play and determine for myself.
 

Strobe

Member
Messages
74
Help!! I click on the link and get onto Mike's 'Soundclick' page and I have a choice of 5 selections, the top one being EXPERIJFGMY. There is no White Man's Blues anywhere on the page. And I can't find it....
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Help!! I click on the link and get onto Mike's 'Soundclick' page and I have a choice of 5 selections, the top one being EXPERIJFGMY. There is no White Man's Blues anywhere on the page. And I can't find it....
It was there, then he posted saying he was re-mixing it. I guess from Sue's post that the remix is there now.
 
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