supportTutorialsCDsPPT mouthpieces

Saxophones Which sax has the best ergonomics

saxnik

Member
Messages
381
Location
Poole, Dorset, United Kingdom
Good question - really you should try a few to see how they feel for you. Mostly one gets used to whatever one learns on!
However, Yanagisawa saxes are very comfortable to play, and I think I'm right in saying that all Yamahas are designed with the same key layout, whatever the size of sax - theoretically you can swap to baritone from soprano and the keys would feel the same...

Good luck!
 

Andante cantabile

Senior Member
Messages
697
I think Saxnik is right about the Yamahas. I have found the YTS-82z extremely easy to use, and it doesn't need big hands. The bari seems to require the same span, but of course it is a little stiffer and heavier. That said, I am convinced that most modern saxophones have good ergonomics. There will always be slight differences that can annoy, or please, a player.
 
OP
M

mojo2682

New Member
Messages
2
Thanks for your help!

Have either of you heard of dc pro saxophones? It looks like i can get a fairly cheap new one (about $600) which is about the range I'd like to pay for my first one.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,232
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
Hi There!

It would be useful to know where you are based - many of the forum users are UK based and dc pro is not a known make in the UK - your question may be better asked on another forum such as Sax On The Web, where more on your compatriots are likely to be based (am I right in imagining you are US based?).

Obviously Yamaha and Yanagisawa are very hard to find at $600.

Kind regards
Tom
 

Clivey

Senior Member
Messages
814
Location
Edinburgh/Hot Rock off African Coast
Don`t know about the best , but I can categorically tell you that my 1935 Conn 10m is the worst I`ve used . Talk about building up muscle memory Wow Even after the action has been messed about with it takes a lot of effort for me "if I don`t keep up daily practice".


One or two of the main springs must be at least 1.5mm in diameter and the pillars are bored to take only this size.

I also have a cheap bently Tenor with a very easy action for small mitts . pity the key noise is so noisy.


I`ve found that both my Alto and Soprano are a lot easier to use ,especially for longer periods of time .
 

Little My

Practice makes better.
Messages
396
Location
Wiltshire, UK.
I tried an Amati tenor last week and found the key layout very compact and easy for smaller hands, far easier than on my Keilwerth. I agree also about Yamahas, I find the key layout of my old YAS-62 very ergonomic too.
 

Andante cantabile

Senior Member
Messages
697
Have either of you heard of dc pro saxophones? It looks like i can get a fairly cheap new one (about $600) which is about the range I'd like to pay for my first one.
I just looked Google since I hadn't paid any attention to them before. It seems to be a brand on sale in the US, and I assume the horns are meade either in Taiwan or China. The site says that there is no international shipping. Here is the URL: www.dcpro.saxophones.com. I don't know whether the brand is on sale elsewhere.

Something that caught my eye is that the list price for one of their tenors, for example, is $2995, but the sale price is $995. Other examples of this sort can be found on the site.

When I see this sort of things, and if I am still interested, I make further enquiries to get an understanding of why this might be the case. If you google "dc pro" you will find that the brand has been discussed on SOTW among others.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,997
Location
Just north of Munich
When I see this big a difference between list and sales price I get really suspicious. Cos cynical me reasons that the list price is only there to justify an inflated retail price. And the sellers are treating the buyers as fools by expecting us to fall for it.

If you're looking for something in this sort of price range, stick to something established where there's good feedback (e.g. in the US Antigua Winds) - or get a throwaway lightly used sax for around 100-200 that's been bought for a kid and not used much. Stick a reasonable mouthpiece on it (Yamaha or Rico) and learn on that. Budget some cash for a tech to go over it - even on a new cheapo chinese horn. Then after a year or two, you'll really know what you want, you can sell the 'throwaway' on ebay for close to what it cost and invest in a decent horn that you'll be sure is right for you.
 

Andante cantabile

Senior Member
Messages
697
I should have added to my earlier post that although many modern saxophones have good ergonomics (there is after a limited manner in which the keys can be arranged, and several of the top brands provide good patterns), the question of ergonomics is only part of the picture. As one might guess, the sound, build quality, etc., have to be there also.
 
Top Bottom