Technical Which material to replace a bite plate?

Discussion in 'Saxophone (technical)' started by MMM, Nov 25, 2015.

  1. MMM

    MMM Senior Member

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    what material can I use to replace a bite plate on a metal mouthpiece?
    I watched mojobari'a video and he uses an acrylic monomer, are these available in the uk?
    Thanks for any contributions!
    M.
     
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  3. Colin the Bear

    Colin the Bear Well-Known Member

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    waterweld works very well. Amazon.
     
  4. jbtsax

    jbtsax old and opinionated

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    You can cut out the shape from the plastic top of a spray paint can to fit the indentation and glue it in place with contact cement. It will wear a long time---especially if you put a patch over it. All you need is a steady hand and an exacto knife.
     
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  5. MMM

    MMM Senior Member

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    Thanks Colin!
    Thanks Jbtsax, I'm looking to restoring it as close as possible to original.
    Anyone tried Milliput?
     
  6. Colin the Bear

    Colin the Bear Well-Known Member

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    Milliput is not very hard and I'm not sure about how safe it is for oral use.

    Waterweld is the same sort of thing, it cures cold and has been passed for use on domestic water supplies. Tough, easy to use and safe.

    J B Water Weld Specially Formulated Epoxy Putty | eBay
     
  7. MMM

    MMM Senior Member

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    Cheers Colin, I have some normal jbweld, will get some water weld too: is that what the pros use?
     
  8. kevgermany

    kevgermany ex Landrover Nut Cafe Moderator

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    Not sure if it's available in other colours, but the waterweld I have is a blueish white. I'm not sure how it'd wear, it files very easily.
     
  9. MMM

    MMM Senior Member

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    Thinking of experimenting with black pigment, see what happens and report back!
     
  10. Colin the Bear

    Colin the Bear Well-Known Member

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    I rebuilt a HR mouthpiece with waterweld after it was recommended here. I've also replaced the bite plate on a brass piece. It's very easy to work with and sticks well. I keep the repairs covered with a patch to protect them from my "beaver" teeth.
     
  11. jonf

    jonf Well-Known Member

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    Waterweld wears very well if you put a patch over. It's certified by the US Food and Drugs Administration as safe for use in vessels containing drinking water, so you can be sure it's safe in your mouth. I wouldn't put normal JBWeld in my mouth.
     
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  12. Steve Marshall

    Steve Marshall Member

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    Not sure I would want epoxy in my mouth. It's OK further down in the mouthpiece. Mojobari uses ordinary JB Weld for mouthpiece repair. Including chip repair on the tip, come to think of it. But it's a bit powdery and I think teeth would wear through it in no time.
    I've used old film canisters in the past. They aren't so readily available these days so something like John's suggestion might be good. But you have to be careful with plastics which can absorb or leech chemicals. Maybe try those black ice cream boxes?
    I've known people to cut down an old mouthpiece and make an ebonite bite plate. It's a lot more work but you might prefer the result.
     
  13. aldevis

    aldevis Surrealist Contributor. Cafe Moderator

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    I guess you can carve them in ebonite from old mouthpieces or clarinet bells and have a "vintage" result.
    Pillinger would use the same compounds ("resins") he uses for his mouthpieces, but I don't think it would be a cheap solution for just a couple of pieces.

    Waterweld is probably the easiest solution. For myself I would use Milliput and a patch.
     
  14. griff136

    griff136 Senior Member

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    Manny - A couple of ideas.
    1. you could make an ebonite plate from an old mouthpiece or from ebonite sheet .
    2. you could use dental epoxy.
    3. You could get a denture maker/repairer to do the job for you.
    4. You could try one of those acrylic nail painting parlours.
     
  15. Colin the Bear

    Colin the Bear Well-Known Member

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  16. Steve Marshall

    Steve Marshall Member

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    Good old Mojobari.
     
  17. Dibbs

    Dibbs Member

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    Milliput is very hard. Almost like stone. The stuff I've used is anyway. Probably not great to put in your mouth though.
     
  18. Steve Marshall

    Steve Marshall Member

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    It's good for palm key risers.
     

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  19. ProfJames

    ProfJames Elementary member

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    How much would a techie charge to do it?
     
  20. Pete Thomas

    Pete Thomas Chief of Stuff Cafe Moderator

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    It should take less than an hour, so whatever their hourly rate is (plus material if they have to buy some in specially)
     
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  21. ProfJames

    ProfJames Elementary member

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    Worth doing for an expensive mpc then, thank you.
     

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