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Beginner Sax whats a good tenor saxophone?

Lloyd

Member
Messages
207
At the risk of repeating myself (and others), Bauhaus Walstein. Superb instruments at bargain basement prices and up there with the super expensive saxes. I bought mine 2 years ago and haven't even thought about changing it for a dearer one - no point. Get a good mouthpiece and ligature and you will be set for years. Birdman of Studio Saxophones will sort you out.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi There!

Lots of Tenor saxes are out there but BW is the best available at under £1000 IMO. Several others are pretty good - John Packer amongst them, or getting a decent used Yani, Yami, Selmer and others. But at £500 it is unrivalled, as Lloyd says - but do invest in a decent mouthpiece and ligature.

Kind regards
Tom
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
It's not so much what brand (although you should avoid the cheap chinese rubbish), but what condition is it in. Plenty of traps.... So buy from a reputable dealer/seller and make sure that it plays properly. This usually means either taking along someone knowledgable, unless you're going to a shop you can trust. Make sure you get a proper guarantee.

Stephen Howard's Haynes Saxophone Manual gives a good overview of what to look for, well worth the investment before you buy (find it on/through Amazon). Amd it'll also help you sort out or diagnose faults as they come up in the future.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Once again the correct stress put on good mouthpiece and lig. This is where the sound starts!!!!
Well done chaps.
Plenty of info on the forum about getting the right m'piece
 
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VirusKiller

Member
Messages
449
sax_dude - you say that you're about to learn tenor, but you're also looking for alto suggestions. Have you simply not made up your mind? From what I've seen, most of your sax options will be available in both alto and tenor flavours, so perhaps you should concentrate first on which instrument you want to play? And there'll be plenty of good advice here.
 

sax_dude08

New Member
Messages
5
sax_dude - you say that you're about to learn tenor, but you're also looking for alto suggestions. Have you simply not made up your mind? From what I've seen, most of your sax options will be available in both alto and tenor flavours, so perhaps you should concentrate first on which instrument you want to play? And there'll be plenty of good advice here.

ive decided that ill start with alto. cause most people say that i should start with alto.
 

thehunt

Member
Messages
785
Sorry chaps i don't think any of us can say what is the correct sax to buy as it is so subjective. I would suggest you go and try some out. you will know what is the right one when you blow it. ( not trying to be difficult but when i was upgrading to my current Mauriat tenor i had it is mind to buy a Selmer as evrybody was saying how good they were. In fact it came about fourth on my list after the Cannonball, Yanigasawa and B&W. But once i had played the Mauriat knew it was for me )
I do know that pric elaso has to be factored in so i do hope you find the right sax for you.
Just don't get me started on mouth pieces...
Good luck, Phil
 

Sue

If at first you don't succeed try try try a Gin
Subscriber
Messages
2,362
Yes definitely go and try a few. I've played on Selmer, Yani, Keilworth but I love my Mauriat more than any of them. Just suits me so go with what suits you and enjoy
 

Taz

Busking Oracle
Messages
3,661
Phil, what on earth has elaso done to upset you this time? :))):))):)))

Sorry I'll get my coat......again!
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
ive decided that ill start with alto. cause most people say that i should start with alto.
There's no reason to avoid the tenor as a beginner, unless it's too big for you - usually only the case with kids and petite ladies. So like the others say, try a few, and make sure you try them with a reasonable mouthpiece, not the rubbish that comes with some cheap saxes.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Absolutely - there is often quite a split between people who play alto and play tenor, and commonly most of us prefer one or the other. Alto is commonly recommended as a starter instrument, as Kev says because some young players find a tenor too heavy - no other reason. It is important to see what you prefer and buy that, not buy one saxophone and then prefer another - waste of money time. If you can't easily try any out you could at least do some internet searches to find some examples of what they each sound like. They have the same fingering just have a different size and different tone/sound/range. Most of what people say is unthought through assumptions which had some truth at sometime - usually based on school music lessons - which are lost in time - ideas move on, but many people do not update their ideas, and can make quite unverifiable assumptions.

So best way of spending your money well is to see which sax is best suited, especially as too many people have bought a tenor after having earlier spent money on an alto. Not necessary IMHO......

Kind regards
Tom
 

thehunt

Member
Messages
785
Sorry chaps, i have ME and find sometimes i lleps backwards or write strange things. The other night i asked the missus where the Snatterjack was... I don't even know what i was looking for. Elaso did not upset me Taz. Trust you to spot that...:welldone
That had me wondering for a bit until I found the post:
 

dorono

Member
Messages
28
I actually think that the alto is a good way to start, since getting a good tone and solid intonation is a bit more of a challenge with that horn, so it makes for a good foundation. Once you sound good on the alto, it's my opinion that you will sound that much better on the other saxophones. At the same time, fingering-wise, I find that alto a bit easier since your fingers are closer together.

As for brands, I'm surprised that nobody's mentioned Yamaha, as Yamaha's have long been an industry standard for beginning and intermediate horns.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi Doron!

My problem with Yamaha student instruments is that they are IMO overpriced compared to other available horns. Also I am a little cautious of the fact that beginners could easily be fooled into thinking that you have to regularly upgrade your instrument from student to intermediate to pro level, all of which has cost implications. In UK a Bauhaus Walstein Alto sax can be bought brand new for under £500 and is considered by many to be of pro standard - some £250 cheaper than the Yamaha 275. I would happily recommend a pro Yami, and you can often buy a used one for less than a new Yami student model. A similar position holds in the brass world where Yami's previously dominant position has weakened as excellent cheaper alternatives have presented themselves. So on a pro level they seem to be sound but there are better and cheaper alternatives at beginner level. I have tried several Yami brass instruments and they seriously do not comp[are well to others as a total package (Weril, John Packer/Rath in the trombone market,for example.

Kind regards
Tom
 

Larn

Member
Messages
67
I think the best saxophone is the one that works for you so go out and try as many types, makes as you can be it student, intermediate or pro and don't discount the second hand market great bargins to be found although it can be harder to try before you buy.

Mark.
 

dorono

Member
Messages
28
Hi Doron!

My problem with Yamaha student instruments is that they are IMO overpriced compared to other available horns. Also I am a little cautious of the fact that beginners could easily be fooled into thinking that you have to regularly upgrade your instrument from student to intermediate to pro level, all of which has cost implications. In UK a Bauhaus Walstein Alto sax can be bought brand new for under £500 and is considered by many to be of pro standard - some £250 cheaper than the Yamaha 275. I would happily recommend a pro Yami, and you can often buy a used one for less than a new Yami student model. A similar position holds in the brass world where Yami's previously dominant position has weakened as excellent cheaper alternatives have presented themselves. So on a pro level they seem to be sound but there are better and cheaper alternatives at beginner level. I have tried several Yami brass instruments and they seriously do not comp[are well to others as a total package (Weril, John Packer/Rath in the trombone market,for example.

Kind regards
Tom
Very good points Tom, as I do know that Yamaha is not the cheapest brand. I keep hearing about Cannonball as being a great bang-for-the-buck, but I have a feeling that they're still more than Bauhaus Walstein.

Thanks!
 
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