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Warped Reeds

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
I just had to do something with more intensity and so after some hard practice I blew out some intensity to this concept of altering the intervals played in unison using baritone. Alto comes in at 1:36-2:15.
I once heard Charlie Parker solo's played this way but I can't remember who was behind it. I loved it! The fact remains, it stuck in my head and I wanted to try something similar.

This should hold me for awhile...

Warped Reeds...Oh hell....why not....In dedication to Wade Cornell for his unselfish support!
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_music.cfm?bandID=1176814
 

Wade Cornell

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,215
Great stuff. I really like the baritone solos with all those block sounds in between. Great sound and feeling to those blocks of sound with that lovely slow vibrato gently wafting. Strong bebop connotations without being too tied or precisely associated. Atonal bebop is certainly your own realm. Giving these compositions block harmonies and movement is really adding another element that surprises and delights.

Have always enjoyed your sense of humour and keen selection of visual references for your music. Hopefully other will pick up on this and delve into your extensive catalogue of work.

Cheers,

Wade
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
Great stuff. I really like the baritone solos with all those block sounds in between. Great sound and feeling to those blocks of sound with that lovely slow vibrato gently wafting. Strong bebop connotations without being too tied or precisely associated. Atonal bebop is certainly your own realm. Giving these compositions block harmonies and movement is really adding another element that surprises and delights.

Have always enjoyed your sense of humour and keen selection of visual references for your music. Hopefully other will pick up on this and delve into your extensive catalogue of work.

Cheers,

Wade

Thank you!
I always loved picking any note and seeing what I could do to make the next note interesting in contrast to the previous one.
That has been the essence of everything I have ever done, which is common ground for every musician, naturally. To try and re-invent myself is something that inherently always went along with this practice. If I didn't have this luxury, which actually we all do, I would have given up playing music decades ago.

It's that 'what next' possibility/desire that has always kept me going.

Glad you enjoyed it!
 
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