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Little My

Practice makes better.
Messages
398
Locality
Wiltshire, UK.
Thank you :) I had tried Teoria but couldn't get to the options for ascending/descending/both. That's really useful.
 

agganitk

Member
Messages
110
I have started ear training a month ago. I noticed I have some success in identify ascending interval but hard time in finding descending interval. Is it me or happens with everyone ?
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,951
Locality
Manchester, UK
I have started ear training a month ago. I noticed I have some success in identify ascending interval but hard time in finding descending interval. Is it me or happens with everyone ?
I don't know about everyone, but I find descending intervals harder to identify, too. Especially sixths and sevenths. And I've been at it fairly steadily for 3 years, now.
 
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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Café Supporter
Messages
21,378
Locality
Just north of Munich
I have a real problem with unisons in a progression. Sounds to me as if the unison is an interval in the direction of the progression, and I can never find the note.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Café Supporter
Messages
21,378
Locality
Just north of Munich
The intervals not found out about these yet .
Oh. Dead simple. Think of the notes in a scale, number them 1-8 from bottom to top. The interval is the gap between the notes. So a fifth is the gap between the first and fifth note of the scale. Unison, or a first, is the same note. Minor intervals are a semitone less than the major intervals. So a minor third is the interval between the first and third notes of a minor scale, 3 semitones instead of 4 semitones for a major third.
 

MandyH

Sax-Mad fiend!
Café Supporter
Messages
3,567
Locality
The Malverns, Worcs
Never count semi-tones!
Always count from the lower note to the higher note - counting the lower note as "1" not "0"
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Café Supporter
Messages
21,378
Locality
Just north of Munich
Never count semi-tones!
Always count from the lower note to the higher note - counting the lower note as "1" not "0"
Agree, but it's needed as part of the explanation.
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Café Supporter
Messages
9,156
Locality
Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
Actually there are two types of intervals to learn to recognize in music. They are melodic and harmonic intervals. Melodic intervals are produced when one note is sounded after another. Harmonic intervals are produced when both notes are sounded at the same time.

Harmonic intervals can be grouped according to the "type" of sound.
Sweet close
- major third, minor third,
Sweet open

- major 6th, minor 6th
Sharp dissonace
- minor 2nd, major 7th
Dull dissonance
- major 2nd, minor 7th
Consonant "Roman"
- perfect 5th
Consonant "Oriental"
- perfect 4th
Consonant "Pure"
- unison, octave
Unstable, Pulling
- augmented 4th, diminished 5th
 
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