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Beginner Unknown Musical Symbol

Les

New Member
Messages
7
Lately I've been seeing a musical symbol on various sites that I don't recognize. I've looked for descriptions of it and haven't found it anywhere. It appears above the staff over the last note of piece. I'm new on cafesaxophone and just found out that I can't post "links" until I've posted 5 times. A bit odd, but anyway the symbol can be seen on tamingthesaxophone dot com under saxophone-beginners-tunes. Sorry about that. Any ideas? –Thanks.
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,273
Is it 'pause' symbol ? if not it's definetly rain cloud :)))

Welcome to the madhouse :D

you beat me to it Martin :thumb: but pleased i got it correct without checking :w00t:
 

Les

New Member
Messages
7
Thank you BigMartin and timmy. I was thinking it might be a fermata, but it's unlike any I've ever seen. Timmy you may be right about it being a rain cloud.:D
 

Les

New Member
Messages
7
BigMartin, I just checked that wikipedia link you sent and that fermata doesn't look at all like the symbol I've been seeing.
 

Koen88

Sax Drinker / Beer player
Messages
426
egypt.gif
If you mean this one, its a fermata. Only the selected text/note style make`s is a different shape..
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
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8,011
In the US it is common to call it a "hold". With younger students it is a "bird's eye". I was taught that all musical symbols and markings mean the same thing---watch the conductor.
 

Justin Chune

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,013
That will be a "pause" sign, where the music stops moving and the musicians play the held note for a bit more than its written value. For effect pauses can occur anywhere and not just in the final bar.

Jim.
 

MandyH

Sax-Mad fiend!
Subscriber
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3,556
As said, you hold the note for longer than its written value. The conductor will usually bring you off by drawing their open hand towards them and closing it as they go. A sort of "snatch" effect, but the hand finishes with the finger and thumb tips all together, rather than as a fist.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
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21,947
...I'm new on cafesaxophone and just found out that I can't post "links" until I've posted 5 times.
Sorry about that. It's to stop some of the unsavoury stuff the spammers post.

A bit odd, but anyway the symbol can be seen on tamingthesaxophone dot com under saxophone-beginners-tunes.
The others are right about the fermatta. A lot of the music written/transcribed for sax uses a modified typeface/font, and this is an example. Confusing.... One way around it is to install Musescore with the jazz fonts. You'll find almost all the symbols in there, and mouse over brings the name up, so you can search for its meaning in google/wikipedia.
 

tommy

Member
Messages
54
As said, you hold the note for longer than its written value. The conductor will usually bring you off by drawing their open hand towards them and closing it as they go. A sort of "snatch" effect, but the hand finishes with the finger and thumb tips all together, rather than as a fist.
sorry Mandy the only conductor I know was on the bus and he always give you :shocked: two finger's
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,125
View attachment 1375
If you mean this one, its a fermata. Only the selected text/note style make`s is a different shape..
Here is another example of fermata
http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermata_mezzi_pubblici_di_superficie

The name comes from the times in which musicians used to hold a long note while waiting for the bus or, in roman times, the underground.

Funny thing: fermata is an Italian word not used in Italy for the musical term (crowned dot).

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corona_(musica)

But French language wins:
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_d'orgue
 
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Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Subscriber
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5,946
How the fermata is interpreted is a genre/period/style thing. In Baroque (e.g. in the sub-divisions of a Bach chorale) it tends to be fairly strict as note length plus 50%, so a semi-breve would become semi-breve plus minim. In late rmusic, it's more open-ended. Mind you, ewven in Bach chorales, if the fermata is at a minor clause division, it tends to be just a slight break like a breath rather than a pause.
 

jeremyjuicewah

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,890
Usually I have a lot of time for the brains in the caf, but that is definately a thumbnail of Ringo Star circa 1969
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
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5,545
Fermata and other symbols sound illustrations on BBC Radio 4, last night 18:30 BST.
 
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