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Twoo big canines

jrintaha

Senior Member
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Helsinki, Finland
Not talking about the neighbor's dogs this time, but my two upper jaw canines, which are apparently too big: once again having to take time off the sax because I've bitten a bleeding wound into the inside of my lower lip while having supper; and in a few days it'll turn into a blister that's sore enough for a week or so, so as to discourage all but the most loathsome of saxophonic cravings.

So the question is, does anyone else suffer or know someone who suffers from frequently accidentally biting their lip while talking or eating, and how do they cope with it? Is there a dental procedure to file or otherwise reduce the size of the offending canines? The blisters my bites make are often almost a centimeter wide, and there's no way to handle the saxophone mouthpiece (or a trumpet or horn mouthpiece for that matter) without aggravating them.
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
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The most obvious responses regarding overlarge canines should not be posted for three days.
 

QWales

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Yes and it usually happens when their is a raised area of skin already and I then find myself biting the same spot several times which is very painfull, as is the resulting mouth ulcer that always follows. Crisps, chocolate and tomatoes are my nemesis when it comes to ulcers. Willpower and Retardex toothpaste my preventative measures.
 

aldevis

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The most obvious responses regarding overlarge canines should not be posted for three days.

Would wild garlic work too?
(sorry, sorry, sorry: stronger than me)

About the OP, I think at some point your lips will get used to it.
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
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Sorry- couldn't resist....two-big-dogs.jpg
 

jrintaha

Senior Member
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Helsinki, Finland
About the OP, I think at some point your lips will get used to it.

I was kind of used to having a mouth ulcer once or twice a month - that's between 12 and 24 weeks a year - and I'd just avoid eating salty, sour, or spicy foods, and just deal with it. But now that I play the sax, preferably every day, the mouth ulcers get irritated and very painful, and the healing takes a much longer time than it used to. (Or at least it feels like a much longer time.) I know it's normal to accidentally bite your lip (or the insides of your cheeks) every now and then, but this is something that happens constantly.
 

Sue

One prosecco, two prosecco, three prosecco - floor
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Sorry- couldn't resist....View attachment 3006

At a quick glance that looks like one massive dog with 2 heads - I need to go to Specsavers!!

@OP sorry about your teeth but I can offer no words of wisdom (on almost any subject really) :) x
 
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Colin the Bear

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Your dentist could probaly reduce them and fit a smaller porcelain crowns or maybe an orthodontist may have some advice and treatment. A gumshield at night might help.
 

aldevis

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I was kind of used to having a mouth ulcer once or twice a month - that's between 12 and 24 weeks a year - and I'd just avoid eating salty, sour, or spicy foods, and just deal with it. But now that I play the sax, preferably every day, the mouth ulcers get irritated and very painful, and the healing takes a much longer time than it used to. (Or at least it feels like a much longer time.) I know it's normal to accidentally bite your lip (or the insides of your cheeks) every now and then, but this is something that happens constantly.

I seem to remember in my early years, when I was told that the more I suffer the better player I would be, that after a while I developed a small scar/callus that is still there.
When I feel fatigue or discomfort, during long big band sessions, I further relax my embouchure, so there is no contact between teeth and lips
 

Colin the Bear

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Me too. A four hour solo busk puts everything under strain. I developed my lip out embouchure for the long haul.
 

jrintaha

Senior Member
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282
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Helsinki, Finland
I seem to remember in my early years, when I was told that the more I suffer the better player I would be, that after a while I developed a small scar/callus that is still there.
When I feel fatigue or discomfort, during long big band sessions, I further relax my embouchure, so there is no contact between teeth and lips

I actually usually play with my lower lip out, but that makes it even worse, as there's more contact between the mouthpiece/reed and the mouth ulcer. Just to clarify, the ulcers aren't caused by biting into my lip while playing, but accidentally and suddenly crunching a part of my lip between my canines when I'm eating or talking - chewing bubblegum is the worst so I've completely given up on that.
 

MandyH

Sax-Mad fiend!
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I was kind of used to having a mouth ulcer once or twice a month - that's between 12 and 24 weeks a year - and I'd just avoid eating salty, sour, or spicy foods, and just deal with it. But now that I play the sax, preferably every day, the mouth ulcers get irritated and very painful, and the healing takes a much longer time than it used to. (Or at least it feels like a much longer time.) I know it's normal to accidentally bite your lip (or the insides of your cheeks) every now and then, but this is something that happens constantly.

And bread..... My daughter has had many and multiple mouth ulcers all her life - even as a toddler she would have a string of ulcers all round the inside of her mouth.
After many years, and partly for other reasons she recently asked if she could try a Gluten-free diet. Result- no mouth ulcers in several months.
The dentist had suggested the Gluten-free diet a number of years ago, but it was impossible because she was such a fussy eater (brought about partly because of a fear of eating due to the mouth ulcers)

I'm not suggesting that this is the cause of your mouth ulcers, but we had assumed it was crisps, or because she chewed all sorts of things she shouldn't (pencils, pen tops, sticking plasters...) rather than looking at her diet.
She hasn't been diagnosed as a coeliac, but changing her diet has had a dramatic effect, not just on the mouth ulcers, but on her whole personality.

Could you use those patches, which are designed to go over mouth ulcers once you have them, as a barrier against your teeth?
 

jrintaha

Senior Member
Messages
282
Locality
Helsinki, Finland
After many years, and partly for other reasons she recently asked if she could try a Gluten-free diet. Result- no mouth ulcers in several months.

...

Could you use those patches, which are designed to go over mouth ulcers once you have them, as a barrier against your teeth?

I was diagnosed with coeliac disease a couple of years ago, so I've been on a gluten-free diet almost as long.

I hadn't thought about patches before, as I didn't realize they made such things, but I'll have to check those out - might speed up the healing process. Thanks for that!
 
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