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Two notes on one stick

jeremyjuicewah

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Just curious. In Otto Langey's book "The Saxophone", specifically on page 91 ex.22, there is a bar which contains semi quavers with two notes on. The group goes C - E/B - Eb/A - D/B. This does occur elsewhere in this book, but not often. Are they options? No mention of this in the front of the book. Anyone know?
 

MartinL

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Just curious. In Otto Langey's book "The Saxophone", specifically on page 91 ex.22, there is a bar which contains semi quavers with two notes on. The group goes C - E/B - Eb/A - D/B. This does occur elsewhere in this book, but not often. Are they options? No mention of this in the front of the book. Anyone know?
Well you wont be able to play both that's for sure :)))

This happens often in "band" parts where either note is acceptable, for example if I am sharing a score at "band", as often happens, the other player will discuss with me and we decide, "you play the top, i'll play the bottom". Both are correct.
 

jeremyjuicewah

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Thanks. Sometimes it does sound as though I am playing both, especially in this piece. I thought it had to be a choice but how strange to write a piece of music and then say you can decide yourself what you play.
Mike
 

Young Col

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2,419
Yes, I have band parts where there are two lines for a particular instrument. Last year we had a piece that had three so as to thicken the harmony.
I don't know the Otto Langey book but a quick look on the interweb describes it as containing studies, minatures and duets. I guess the pieces you are describing Mike are ones that can be played as duets, mostly in unison but with split harmonies where it sounds attractive.

Also helps you as an intro to how harmony parts fit with melody lines.
YC
 
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Pyrografix

Senile Member
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1,026
Just curious. In Otto Langey's book "The Saxophone", specifically on page 91 ex.22, there is a bar which contains semi quavers with two notes on. The group goes C - E/B - Eb/A - D/B. This does occur elsewhere in this book, but not often. Are they options? No mention of this in the front of the book. Anyone know?
I'm currently working with this book - where you have an option of two notes, the lower notes are usually easier to play, with the higher notes often venturing into the altissimo range.........something to revisit as skill/confidence develops!

Cheers,

Amanda
 

Justin Chune

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3,011
That's an old book and I think that some old saxophones only played up to D. It's a range thing, if the higher note is out of our range we use the alternative.

Jim.
 

jeremyjuicewah

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Thanks all and yes, it is an old book but its still on the shelf, I bought mine about six months ago in uk. My teacher has the same book printed in the fifties. It has not been updated. One or two errors in the early book are reproduced in the current printing. Its a good book all round though and I get on well with it.
 

Justin Chune

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I've been playing some of the duets with a friend and we like them a lot. We play other stuff as well. The studies you are playing are unattributed in the book but they are in fact Ferling's "48 Studies for Oboe or Saxophone" These are well known, and you may find them being played on You Tube.

Jim.
 

jeremyjuicewah

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Thanks Jim. Me and teacher play duets now and then. I've got a good book of 40 duets for flute that works well. I will check that out on you tube. Very very pleasing music to play and listen to. Technique is coming on fine but I am not anywhere like up to speed on them. Method makes a good change from the bloooze and swing too. Have to say I had not heard of Ferling before now but good to know.
Mike
 
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