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Transposing

Nickg8

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Hi all,
I have a quick question. How do I transpose Baritone to Bass guitar in bass clef ?
Thanks.

Nick
 

Nick Wyver

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Take 3 sharps off the key signature (or add 3 flats depending on where you're starting) and change the treble clef for a bass one. It will now read correctly for a bass guitar.

The only thing that might cause you a bit of thought is dealing with accidentals.
 

Colin the Bear

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If you play the written bass clef as treble clef on the bari and it's done.


Not sure if it works the other way round my brain hurts.
 

MandyH

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Yes, Colin, but don't forget the 3sharps bit as well.
 

jbtsax

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Accidentals are easy to deal with in transposition if you ask the question, "what did they do to the note in the original"?

Sharps and flats are obvious, they raised or lowered the note 1/2 step. Naturals did one or the other depending upon the key signature. If in the original key the note was a flat, a natural raises it. If the note was a sharp, the natural lowers it. If You simply have the accidental do the same thing in the "change the clef and add 3 flats or take away 3 sharps" transposition you are good to go.
 

Tenor Viol

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Hmm, I'm not a fan of the add/subtract a sharps/flats and read it as though y clef school of transposition - maybe it's the way my brain works, but I'd write it out in the correct clef and key, but I understand why people do it.

The reason the 'switch the clef' thing works is as follows. The bari is an Eb instrument and it sounds an octave an a major sixth below what is written. So, if middle C is written (1st leger line below treble clef), what actually comes out is the Eb below the bass clef (1st leger line below bass clef).

The bass is at 'concert pitch' so the written notes for it have to be the ones that will actually be heard. To go TO concert pitch from Eb, you need to shift key signature by a minor third by knocking THREE semi-tones off the key signature. So,

B 5# => D 2#
E 4# => G 1#
A 3# => C 0
D 2# => F 1b
G 1# => Bb 2b
C 0 => Eb 3b
F 1b => Ab 4b
Bb 2b => Db 5b
Eb 3b => Gb 6b

Which if you look at it is the relative minor...

For the accidentals, do what jbtsax says.

 
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MandyH

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Hmm, I'm not a fan of the add/subtract a sharps/flats and read it as though y clef school of transposition - maybe it's the way my brain works, but I'd write it out in the correct clef and key, but I understand why people do it.

when your band conductor (who also play bari sax herself, elsewhere) calls across the band at you, asking you to go over and help the trombone out, you don't really get time to work it all out and write it down in the correct clef and key.
in fact, I barely got time to extract myself and my sax from the sax section and wend my way to the trombone before she re-started the piece.
Rhythm may have been correct, accidentals anything but!
 

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