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Beginner Tooth marks on lip

Tommy Ng

Member
Messages
580
Hi

This may sound a bit weird but it happens to me. I used to practise for one hour in one session but recently i do two hours in one go (after i bought an e-sax). Two hours of continuous practise might be too long for my "lower lip". It is sore when i practise the next day and unable to proceed. I notice that there is a line of tooth marks on my lower lip, only feel sore when i bite the same location (unfortunately i have to bite the same location when i practise).

I tried not to bite the mouthpiece but the intonation was completely out.

Wonder if anyone here has the same experience?
Have i applied too much pressure on the mouthpiece? (or my teeth are too sharp>:))

:confused:
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
The pressure should be coming from your lips and the muscles in them, not from your teeth.
If you haven't got it, get Larry Teal's the joy of the saxophone and do the embouchure exercises there.
Converting to a lip-out embouchure may help/force you to get the pressure from your lips/not your teeth.
 

Tommy Ng

Member
Messages
580
The pressure should be coming from your lips and the muscles in them, not from your teeth.
If you haven't got it, get Larry Teal's the joy of the saxophone and do the embouchure exercises there.
Converting to a lip-out embouchure may help/force you to get the pressure from your lips/not your teeth.
Thank you so much for the advice, that is something new to me :)
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
The pressure should be coming from your lips and the muscles in them, not from your teeth.
If you haven't got it, get Larry Teal's the joy of the saxophone and do the embouchure exercises there.
Converting to a lip-out embouchure may help/force you to get the pressure from your lips/not your teeth.
Good old Kev. Spot on again!

John.
 

McSax

New Member
Messages
13
I do loads of busking at christmas, and I usually end up playing for about 9 hours each weekend in december... i usually only get this problem then.

I was talking to one of my friends about this problem, as he does the same thing at xmas, and he said he used to have the same problem, but he now get one of those papers that you wrap tobacco in for cigarettes (not sure what they're called) and puts it between his teeth and bottom lip. I've never tried it, but he swears by it, so it might be worth a go.
 

AdamBradley

Member
Messages
134
I've only gotten them once I first start playing again after a long break, or a step up in embouchure requirements. I got them when I first started playing my oboe again, I got them when I first started playing saxophone and I'v e got them now as I've been playing Sop for the first time the last few weeks. It's usually not painful, I can just feel damaged tissue/light scarring under my lip. If it's ever too painful to actually play the next day then I know I've definitely overdone it and go about actively forcing myself to play short bursts with a proper, comfortable embouchure that isn't biting.

Oh and, Rizla, those cigarette papers are called!
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
None, but some of the lip may be over the teeth - but it shouldn't be trapped between the teeth and the reed. There's a ring of muscle which supports the lips, this needs to be built up so that it's strong enough for you to contol the reed without the lip being compressed by the teeth. As you do the Teal exercises, you'll lean to feel the muscles and use them on the reed.

If you open you mouth slightly, then without movign your jaw, bring your lips together and then squeeze them tightly against each other, you'll feel the muscles in the lips working. You should be able to do this without the inside fot he lips touching your teeth. And not be able to force your finger between your lips as you press them together. .
 

Gallen

Senior Member
Messages
397
Hi!
I can't seem to find the book referenced above by Larry Teal; is it the Art of Saxophone playing? Only one I could find on Amazon.

Alvin
 

singlereed

Member
Messages
124
Definitely wil be helped by a better embouchure. The Larry Teal book describes it quite well but it is even better if a good teacher shows you. The key is that the embouchure should be 'circular' - the bit that is probably missing is that you need pressure from each side of your mouth as well as from top and bottom. Try to apply pressure to the reed from the lip, not from the jaw and teeth - if anything, try to pull the jaw down slightly whilst pushing up with the lip. This will also help with your intonation in the upper part of the range of the instrument. Some players like to roll the bottom lip out slightly - especially on tenor or baritone. Having said all of that, you may have sharp lower teeth and some players take a cigarette paper and fold it a couple of times and put it over their bottom teeth. You might mention this to your dentist next time you go in case anything can be done to smooth your teeth. You can also have aguard made by your dentist to fit on your lower teeth; I have seen a kit to make your own but I am not sure they are very effective.
 
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