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Tomato. Bread & Wild Garlic soup

Lovely thick soup for late spring!

Ingredients: (For 4 persons).

Large bunch Wild Garlic leaves.

3 tins of chopped tomatoes.

1/2 loaf Sourdough bread (about 200g).

500ml chicken stock.

Olive oil.

Sea salt and Black Pepper.

1. Chop Wild Garlic and wilt with little water. Drain and chop more finely.
2. Heat large saute pan, add stock and 8 tbsps olive oil and wild garlic.
3. The stock will begin to evaporate, then slice and add bread and fry over
high heat until stock is absorbed and bread starts to crisp.
4. Add the tomatoes, reduce heat and stir to break up bread.
5. Cook for 15/20 mins and add water when soup thickens too much.
6. Season towards end of cooking.
7. Serve with more Olive Oil, and possibly some Parmesan if desired.

Enjoy!
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,215
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
Not that important - you want the stock to flavour the bread and be absorbed into it, but the oil will continue to caramelise the bread before you add the tomatoes. The point is that the bread absorbs the flavour of the stock and herbs and is also caramelised so that it has intense flavour. The bread should end up absorbed into the soup but with some bits remaining, especially the crusty pieces.
 
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kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
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1,736
Location
cocks hill perranporth KERNOW
This sounds great! Being veggie I'll substitute vegetable bouillon for the chicken stock... I'll let you know of my impression of the veggie version.

We have tons of wild garlic around here. We also have three cornered leek (Allium triquetrum) which is also edible. Don't plant it in your garden, though - it will take over! Or if you do, treat it like raspberries or mint and confine it with a deeply dug fence of sheet metal or similar.
 
Messages
39
Location
Athens , Greece
This sounds great! Being veggie I'll substitute vegetable bouillon for the chicken stock... I'll let you know of my impression of the veggie version.

We have tons of wild garlic around here. We also have three cornered leek (Allium triquetrum) which is also edible. Don't plant it in your garden, though - it will take over! Or if you do, treat it like raspberries or mint and confine it with a deeply dug fence of sheet metal or similar.

Are you vegetarian ideologically or you just don't like the taste and smell of meat?
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,215
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
I live quite near the small, steep sided Bishopston valley on the Gower. In spring the whole valley is covered in Wild Garlic, about 3 miles long and up to 60 ft on the sides.
 

kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
Location
cocks hill perranporth KERNOW
Are you vegetarian ideologically or you just don't like the taste and smell of meat?

I was not always vegetarian - see my recipe "Ox liver au mer", which every meat eater should try (even if they have to modify the recipe by, for instance, not doing it on board a yacht).

My becoming veggie is described in "Connoisseur Veggie curry for dumbos" - the power of female persuasion... I had a meat eater get half way through this recipe before he realised there was no meat in it. (Mind you, he was a dumbo!)

Having started not eating meat, I realised several things. One was about refrigerators: they are a pain on small vessels, and refusing to put up with the hassle meant fresh meat was off the menu unless in harbour. Switching to a vegetarian diet changed that instantly and made planning meals easier.

Secondly, pulses are a far cheaper way to get protein. Being a boat bum at the time, this was a consideration...

Thirdly, I felt so much better not eating meat. I found that meat had been slowing not just my digestive system, but everything else, mind included... so much so that people who are naturally lean and quick types need to take care not to eat too much raw veg or they can get quite jittery!

Fourthly, vegetarian food can be amazingly delicious and very varied - it's just a case of collecting some recipes. There are lots of simple ones, you don't need to be a genius in the kitchen.

Fifthly, the medical profession now believe that vegetarians tend to live longer. I think that they are right.

I've been veggie for thirty years now - tho' I must admit in the first year or two I occasionally relented and had a beef pasty or haggis and chips in Jock's Cafe in Lostwithiel... but there are delicious vegetarian pasties and haggis and, as my ex-wife-to-be once famously said: "A sausage doesn't have to have meat in it. A sausage is just a shape" - which confounded her inquisitor no end...

That's my experience - but each to their own. 'Twould be a dull world if everyone did the same thing!
 
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