Think my tutor was drunk last night....

FastFred

Member
Messages
80
Had a lesson last night, generally have one about every 3 weeks. I started with the Maiden Voyage Aebersold book about 6 weeks ago and am making good progress improvising. I recently bought a Link7*STM and have found it produces a much smoother sound than my 7* Ebonite and is less stuffy at the top end.
Last night we were playing an easy Gblues number. I play tenor (YTS62), the tutor plays Soprano and we alternate then play together. Anyway my tutor reckons that I am playing Coltrane 'angular' style with a Stan Getz West Coast sound and that the two don't normally go together. It went completely over my head for sure. He said it wasn't a negative just that perhaps I should try some different reeds. I am currently on Vandoren Jazz 3's.
He didn't seem drunk at the time (!) and as flattered as I am being compared to these two guys what reeds should I try? I actually like the smooth sound I have developed. Should I listen to some Getz instead and learn some of his licks?
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,651
Location
Betelgeuse
As the newt....

My old clarinet teacher actually was drunk most of the time. In a half hour lesson he'd get through a tumbler full - and I mean full - of whisky and about five fags. All the while his saintly looking elderly wife shooting at cats in the back garden.:shocked:
 

ManEast

Member
Messages
214
Location
Southsea .Portsmouth
My old clarinet teacher actually was drunk most of the time. In a half hour lesson he'd get through a tumbler full - and I mean full - of whisky and about five fags. All the while his saintly looking elderly wife shooting at cats in the back garden.:shocked:
Hi
This one is fantastic:)))...you should pass it on to the Fast Show.

Thank you.
 
OP
F

FastFred

Member
Messages
80
To be honest I not sure if 'tutor' is the right description 'cos he generally doesn't teach me anything. I have got to that stage where I kind of go back 'cos I like him and he is a hell of a player and it is good to play/improvise with him. I have worked out for myself what I need to do over the next year, scales, chords, listening, improvising and ear training. I could probably find better things to do with £25 an hour

Anyway to get back to the thread... Do seasoned/very good players tend to stick with one reed or use more to get different sounds?
 

cmelodysax

New Member
Messages
25
Location
Weymouth, Dorset UK
I'd say (imho) that the sound stays reasonably constant (give or take a bit of woodiness :)) - but that it's the responsiveness that allows you to 'work' a reed to best effect.

Once you find a reed which responds well to your style of playing, then you'll be able to stretch the sound boundaries. A poorly responding reed will sap the creativity.

I'm certainly "seasoned" (don't know about "very good" :( ) but I found Rico Royals decades ago, and, apart from occasional excursions with LaVoz for a slightly less edgier / more woody sound, the response is what does it for me...
 
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